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Mapping Biodiversity and Setting Conservation Priorities for SE Queensland’s Rainforests Using DNA Barcoding
Shapcott, A;Forster, Paul I;Guymer, Gordon P;McDonald, William J F;Faith, D...
Academic Journal Academic Journal | 01/01/2015 Please log in to see more details
Australian rainforests have been fragmented due to past climatic changes and more rece... more
Mapping Biodiversity and Setting Conservation Priorities for SE Queensland’s Rainforests Using DNA Barcoding
01/01/2015
Australian rainforests have been fragmented due to past climatic changes and more recently landscape change as a result of clearing for agriculture and urban spread. The subtropical rainforests of South Eastern Queensland are significantly more fragmented than the tropical World Heritage listed northern rainforests and are subject to much greater human population pressures. The Australian rainforest flora is relatively taxonomically rich at the family level, but less so at the species level. Current methods to assess biodiversity based on species numbers fail to adequately capture this richness at higher taxonomic levels. We developed a DNA barcode library for the SE Queensland rainforest flora to support a methodology for biodiversity assessment that incorporates both taxonomic diversity and phylogenetic relationships. We placed our SE Queensland phylogeny based on a three marker DNA barcode within a larger international rainforest barcode library and used this to calculate phylogenetic diversity (PD). We compared phylo- diversity measures, species composition and richness and ecosystem diversity of the SE Queensland rainforest estate to identify which bio subregions contain the greatest rainforest biodiversity, subregion relationships and their level of protection. We identified areas of highest conservation priority. Diversity was not correlated with rainforest area in SE Queensland subregions but PD was correlated with both the percent of the subregion occupied by rainforest and the diversity of regional ecosystems (RE) present. The patterns of species diversity and phylogenetic diversity suggest a strong influence of historical biogeography. Some subregions contain significantly more PD than expected by chance, consistent with the concept of refugia, while others were significantly phylogenetically clustered, consistent with recent range expansions.

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FoR multidisciplinary - biodiversity assessment - South East Queensland rainforest flora - DNA barcode library - flora - phylogenetic diversity (PD)

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Suid-Afrikaanse nywerheid / Tony Koenderman
PRINTED MATL | 1978
Available at NMU South Open Shelves (HD2356.S6K62)
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Spirituality & religion.(Book review)
Christian, Graham
Periodical Periodical | Library Journal. Oct 1, 2014, Vol. 139 Issue 16, p. 70, 2 p. Please log in to see more details

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South African industry / Tony Koenderman
PRINTED MATL | 1978
Available at NMU South Protecta (HD2356.S6K6)
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Digital Techniques for Documenting and Preserving Cultural Heritage
BENTKOWSKA-KAFEL, ANNA;MacDONALD, LINDSAY;BENTKOWSKA-KAFEL, ANNA;MacDONALD,...

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Suid-Afrikaanse kuns / James Ambrose Brown
PRINTED MATL | 1978
Available at NMU North Open Shelves (NX589.8.S6B72 1978)
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Heritage Protocol Online Inventory & Submission Process
McDonald, Robert (authoraut);Smith, Plato (authoraut)
The presentation highlights the early development of FSU Heritage Protocol using DigiT... more
Heritage Protocol Online Inventory & Submission Process
The presentation highlights the early development of FSU Heritage Protocol using DigiTool digital assets management system for the digital collection development and resource discovery of select historic FSU materials digitized for online display. ; Heritage Protocol, digital content managment system, DigiTool

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Information science - Library science - Science--Study and teaching - Technology--Study and teaching

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South African science / James Ambrose Brown
PRINTED MATL | 1978
Available at NMU North Open Shelves (QH127.S6B7 1978) plus 1 more
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Stories of mountain folk broadcast: 2013-10-05
Garza, Amy Ammons;Cain, Doreyl Ammons;Casey McDonald, Victoria A.;Rhodes, J...
Amy begins the show with her story “On Cullowhee Mountain,” which tells of her father’... more
Stories of mountain folk broadcast: 2013-10-05
01/01/2013
Amy begins the show with her story “On Cullowhee Mountain,” which tells of her father’s family, the Ammons family. “Images & Memories” accompanies the story. On Creative Corner, Doreyl’s guest is once more George Frizzell of Sylva. He talks about the Special Collections department at Western Carolina University’s Hunter Library and the work the department does to preserve and collect local heritage and history. “How I Long to be in the Mountains” by Mountain Faith follows the interview. On Stories of Mountain Folk, Amy welcomes Jean Frady again. Jean talks about her new book, Going Home : Living in Green Pastures, which is about her husband Cecil’s last years. The interview is followed by “A Beautiful Life” by Lonesome Sound. Victoria’s guest on Black Roots of Appalachia is Leroy Jackson of Sylva. He talks about being a student-athlete at Sylva-Webster High School in the early 1960s. “Sugarfoot Rag” by Ron Smith follows the interview. On Down Another Road, Judy talks with Troy Harrison, a musician who was born in Hot Springs but now lives in Buncombe County. Troy talks about his musical pursuits and tells a story about pretending to be Sheila Kay Adams’s son in order to attend a folk festival. He also talks about different styles of banjo playing and plays “John Henry.” The show concludes with “Wildwood Flower” by Henry Queen.

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Storytelling -- North Carolina -- Jackson County - Hunter Library - Libraries -- Special collections - Authors - American -- North Carolina - Western - High school athletes -- North Carolina -- Jackson County - African American high school students -- North Carolina -- Jackson County - Musicians -- North Carolina - Librarians -- North Carolina -- Jackson County - storytelling - history - local writings - life stories - music

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South African people / Brian Barrow
PRINTED MATL | 1977
Available at NMU South Open Shelves (DT766.B37)
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Loblolly ; Loblolly - Vol 19-02
Lincoln King;Jennifer Johnson;Jenny Bell;Mariane Dill;Melissa Essery;Teresa...
Academic Journal Academic Journal | Loblolly, published in Gary, Texas Please log in to see more details
Milton M. Holland — Interview with Dorothy Franks — The Afro American Texans — The Bad... more
Loblolly ; Loblolly - Vol 19-02
Loblolly, published in Gary, Texas
Milton M. Holland — Interview with Dorothy Franks — The Afro American Texans — The Badge of Gallantry — The Congressional Medal of Honor — Individual Decorations of the Civil War and Earlier — The Heights of Glory — From Slavery to Freedom — Politician and Educator.

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Manners & Customs - Folklore - Tradition - Heritage - Panola County - Texas - Civil War - Medal of Honor - Black Americans

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South African sport / Neville Leck
PRINTED MATL | 1977
Available at FH Howard Pim Library (A 796.0968 LEC) plus 1 more
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Journeys Through Jackson 2017 Vol.27 No.03
Jackson County Genealogical Society (N.C.)
Academic Journal Academic Journal | 01/01/2017 Please log in to see more details
Journeys Through Jackson is the official journal of the Jackson County Genealogical So... more
Journeys Through Jackson 2017 Vol.27 No.03
01/01/2017
Journeys Through Jackson is the official journal of the Jackson County Genealogical Society, Inc. The journal began as a monthly publication in July 1991, was published bimonthly from 1994 to 2003, and continues today as a quarterly publication. The journal issues in this digital collection are presented as annual compilations. ; Journeys Through Jackson The Official Journal of the Jackson County Genealogical Society, Inc. Vol. XXVII, No. III Fall 2017 JACKSON COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY, INC. 2017 Officers Presiden . Lynn Hotaling Vice Presidents . Norma Bryson Clayton, George Frizzell Secretary . Deborah Blazer Treasurer . Teresa Deitz Manring Librarian. Marie Clark Office Manager . Carol Bryson Web Master, Computer Technician . Jason N. Gregory Chair, Publications (Editor) . Sanji Talley Watson Journeys Through Jackson is the official publication of the Jackson County Genealogical Society. Members and non-members are invited to submit genealogical materials for publication, with the understanding that the editor reserves the right to edit these materials for genealogical content, clarity, or taste. The Society assumes no responsibility for errors of fact that may be contained in submissions, and except where noted, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor or of the Jackson County Genealogical Society. The Society accepts no advertising for this publication except for notices from other non-profit groups. From the Editor Fall is here and Winter is on its way. Plan on doing lots of genealogy through the winter to come. Thank you to all of the people who have donated items for use in JTJ. Our journal is as good as the members that support it. Remember if you have pictures, information, or stories that you would like to share, please get the information to me. Christmas is coming up soon, and great gift ideas are a membership to the Society or one of our great publications. We also have CDs that cover the papermill and the Centennial of Jackson County. Feel free to come by the office and make someone’s Christmas brighter. Our wish for you all in the coming year is that you find the elusive ancestor, climb that brick wall and “finish” your genealogy search. Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays and Seasons Greetings from all of us at JCGS to all of you. REMEMBER December meeting will be on December 5th, at 6 pm in the Community Room in the Historic Old County Courthouse in Sylva. We will be installing our Officers and announcing the winners of our annual awards. Bring a covered dish and join us. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 97 Table of Contents Table of Contents .97 JCGS Photo Album. 98-102 Dr. John R. Brinkley: Memorials on the Jackson County Landscape . 103-108 New Day. New Location for JCGS Holiday Dinner.108 JCGS Library Receives Important Collection . 109-110 Reminder .110 1880 Jackson County Census Records . 111-114 Descendants of William Solomon Parker, Sr . 115-118 1945 Jackson County Death Certificates . 119-121 Uncle Hubert Bryson – Baptizing on Johns Creek, Early 1950’s.122 Outline Descendant Report for Frederick (Baumgarten) Bumgarner. . 123-126 Searching, Internet & DNA . 127-128 JCGS President Report .129 JCGS Ofice Manager Report .130 Mountain Heritage Day & The Rebel Cruise-In . 131-132 2017 Members . 133-138 Library Acquisitions .138 JCGS Monthly Meetings . 139-141 History. Family Stories. Heritage .142 Index . 143-144 This issue of JTJ is dedicated to a lifetime and dedicated member MACK SUTTON December Meeting and Covered Dish Supper December 5, 2017 6:00 pm Community Room, Old Courthouse Bring a cover dish and join us for fellowship, installation of Officers, and the presentation of the Society’s yearly awards. If you have any questions, feel free to contact the JCGS office Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 98 JCGS Photo Album We ran this picture in the last issue of JTJ as a photograph of unknown people. We are fortunate that two different people have identified these people for us, Wanda Stephens Herrin and Paul Lindsay. We have combined the information that we received from both. Paul further states that his records indicate that this photograph was taken around 1909. He also said that he would be willing to share information with anyone who is interested. This is the Daniel Harrison and Isabella Elizabeth Crawford Phillips family. Row 1, seated, left to right: Betty Jane Phillips Hughes 1873-1951 (married Henry Bascombe Hughes, and had Glen, Texie and Henry); Daniel Harrison “Dan” Phillips, 27 Oct 1848 – 21 Jan 1914; Isabella Elizabeth “Ibby” Crawford Phillips, 12 Apr 1853 – 9 Dec 1915; Rebecca Emeline “Tid” Phillips 1872 – 1918, (married John Crawford, and had Effie, Beulah, Gertrude, Willa Mae). Row 2, standing, left to right: Nannie Phillips Coward 1889 – 1970 (married George B. Coward and had, Marie, Bill, Virginia, Isabel, G. B., Kate, Fred); Rufus Daniel “Rufe” Phillips 1893 – 1948 (married Burlie Long and had Roy, Ruby, Mar, Pearl, James B., Laura, Dan); Eva “Elvie” Phillips 1895 – 1996 (married Oscar Ensley and had Charles and Ruth); John Gilliad Phillips 1877 – 1966 (married Clara Bertie Smith and had Carl, Blanche, Jake, Johnny, Thelma, Helen); and Estella “Stell” Phillips 1897 – 1984 (married Charles Harrison Stephens and had Kenneth, Harry, Duward, William, Dan, Dave, Ed, Mary, Neil, Fannie, and Shirley). Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 99 JCGS Photo Album The couple to the left are: David P. Ammons (b. 1821) and his wife, Mary C. Carson (b. 1820). He was the son of John Jackson Ammons (15 Jun 1792-abt 1855) and Eda Peek (1803-abt 1880). This couple is George Washington Henderson (4 Aug 1835-28 Sep 1914) and his wife, Millie Lavada Peek (27 Mar 1838-16 Apr 1932). He is the son of Canada Henderson (1799-1881) and Mary W. Tillery (1811-1897). She is the daughter of Zachariah James Peek (1793-1845) and Sarah Ann Moore (1798-1848). Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 100 JCGS Photo Album Above is a photograph of Andrew Jackson “Jack” Hoxit (1820-1885) and his wife, Martha A. Slatton (1830-1921). The couple below are Milton M. Stewart (12 Apr 1832-21 Sep 1921) and his wife, Rhoda A. Hooper (1 May 1842-26 Oct 1927). Milton is the son of John Posey Stewart and Mary Moss. Rhoda is the daughter of Andrew M. Hooper (Burke) and Sarah Margaret Woodring. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 101 JCGS Photo Album This is the four Jacobs: Jacob Parker Moore (23 Dec 1868-28 Aug 1933); Jacob Theodore Stewart (9 Mar 1858-2 Apr 1945); Jacob Wade Hampton Henry (20 May 1868-26 Jan 1939); Jacob C. Woodring (15 Aug 1853-14 Feb 1906). Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 102 JCGS Photo Album The man above left is William Talifero Holbrook (1 Apr 1813-10 Aug 1857) and Catherine “Katy” Setzer (1 Nov 1818-25 Feb 1910). They are the children of Larkin and Sarah Sheckles Holbrook and John Miller Setzer and Catherine Tarr. The two photographs on the bottom are of the same man, Dock Estes Burrell (17 May 1883-13 Sep 1968). Does anyone know what the uniform was from? Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 103 Dr. John R. Brinkley Dr. John R. Brinkley – Memorials on the Jackson County Memorials on the Jackson County Memorials on the Jackson County Landscape This is the second part of the article written by Lynn Hotaling and George Frizzell As noted in the previous issue of Journeys, Dr. John R. Brinkley (1885–1942) is one of the Jackson County’s most famous, or in this case infamous (or even nefarious), native sons. Born in Beta, Brinkley was raised alongside the Tuckaseigee River by his stepmother (also his great aunt) Sarah Mingus Brinkley. He left Sylva penniless but found fame and fortune during the 1920s and 1930s after he hit upon the idea of treating male impotence by transplanting goat glands into humans, performing hundreds of surgeries in hospitals he founded in Milford, Kan., Del Rio, Texas, and Little Rock, Ark. After Kansas authorities stripped him of his medical license in 1930, he built a new hospital in Del Rio, where he also constructed the world’s most powerful radio station across the Rio Grande River in Mexico, out of reach of U.S. regulation. Brinkley ended his career in bankruptcy court and died a broken man in 1942, but along the way he revolutionized political campaigning by introducing radio advertising, sound trucks and airplane travel during his 1930 write-in attempt to win the Kansas governorship. His professional career and personal life were filled with dramatics, controversy, and self-promotion. However, he retained ties with the county of his birth and its people, though there has been a noticeable ebb and flow in the recognition of that association over the decades. In the 1930s, during a high point of his success and fame, he left his imprint on the county in the form of frequent mentions in the newspaper, events in his honor, promotions on his radio station, and the acquisition of property or by investments. He acquired the Jack Wike farm in Tuckasegee in 1932, purchasing the property from his former mother-in-law, Laura Hooper Wike, and her son Claude. He immediately marked it as his own by ordering the construction of rock walls lining the driveway, with “Dr. John R.” on the left side and “Brinkley” on the right. (The gates to his mansion in Del Rio also proclaimed his name.) That Tuckasegee property now belongs to Tommy Beutell and serves as the base for Wolf Creek Tree Farm. Brinkley’s name spelled out in white stones against mostly gray rock is still visible, and the construction and re-routing of N.C. 107 between East LaPorte and Tuckasegee will not impact those walls. Also visible from Highway 107 are two brick silos that Brinkley had constructed after he purchased the former Wike property. While his main economic pursuits in Kansas and Texas were suspect – his infamous goat gland surgeries and the “snake oil” remedies he sold over his radio station in Mexico just across the Rio Grande River from Del Rio – his efforts to turn a profit at farming were more straightforward and appreciated by area residents. The late Gladys Hooper (mother of JCGS member Mary Jo Cobb) was acquainted with Brinkley, and her husband, the late Ayscue Hooper, helped build those silos. Gladys Hooper said that while she couldn’t speak to how Brinkley acted other places, he returned to Tuckasegee at the height of the Great Depression and put local people including her husband to work. However, the most enduring of the local Brinkley symbols are in the form of several monuments he commissioned in the 1930s that acknowledged his familial ties to the county. The most notable of these memorials were to his mother and to his stepmother, whom he called “Aunt Sally.” The latter marker has often been invoked in reference to “Aunt Sally’s curve” on Highway 107 near East LaPorte, as it was placed in a sharp bend of the road. With the above-mentioned changes to 107, Aunt Sally’s curve will be straightened considerably and the monument Brinkley erected to Sarah Mingus Brinkley will no longer be visible to passing motorists. NCDOT is planning a short access road off the new highway to allow travelers to access both Brinkley’s Aunt Sally memorial and the adjacent historical marker that commemorates Brinkley’s life and exploits. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 104 Dr. John R. Brinkley erected this monument to his stepmother, Sarah Mingus Brinkley, whom he called “Aunt Sally,” alongside N.C. 107. It reads: AUNT SALLY THE BOYHOOD HOME / OF DR. JOHN R. BRINKLEY / AND HIS / AUNT SALLY. / HER GRAVE IS ON THE HILL- / TOP ACROSS THE RIVER. SHE IS / REMEMBERED AND LOVED FOR / HER MINISTRATIONS TO THE / SICK OF THE COMMUNITY. THIS MARKER ERECTED IN 1937 / IN LOVING MEMORY / BY/HER LITTLE BOY JOHNNIE. / SHE WAS THE ONLY MOTHER I / EVER KNEW / J. R. BRINKLEY, M.D.” The adjacent historical marker (above right), approved in 1994 and dedicated in 1995, reads: JOHN R. BRINKLEY 1885 – 1942 Medical maverick, radio and advertising pioneer, candidate for governor of Kansas. Boyhood home stood across the river. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 105 In keeping with Brinkley’s indulgence and self-praise, the inscriptions on these monuments prominently feature his name along with those of the people being honored. There are also several headstones, not all of which he commissioned, to his father and stepmother, his first wife (Sally Wike, later Engren), and his in-laws, many of which are in Wike Cemetery. Dr. John R. Brinkley erected a joint monument to his father and stepmother in Wike Cemetery. A tall cylindrical stone remembers his father, J.R. Brinkley (top left) on one side and his stepmother (“Aunt Sally”) (top right) on the other. The tops of the smaller stones on either side (lower photos) are carved with the names “John” and “Sarah.” Sarah’s side of the tall stone (top right) is discolored, turning almost black. It’s hard to read and has been digitally lightened here. The side for J.R. Brinkley reads: J.R. BRINKLEY. / BORN / SEP. 26, 1828. / DIED/APR. 14, 1896 / The Storms they may howl / The loud Thunders roll / At peace is his Spirit / At rest is his Soul. Sarah’s side reads: SARAH / Wife of / J.R. Brinkley / Born / Mar. 22, 1838 / Died / Dec. 26, 1906. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 106 Brinkley’s legacy elicits a wide range of responses – humor, embarrassment, discomfort, or irritation. This article is not meant to be a thorough genealogy of his family. Trying to navigate Brinkley is a maze worthy of the labyrinth of the Minotaur from Greek mythology, as Brinkley himself built false passages and wove misleading information into his life story. It is based, in part, on research that led to suppositions at times. It is hoped that readers will be able to offer confirmation, clarification, or rebuttal. Brinkley wove a variety of reinterpretations and variations into accounts of his life, including in his authorized biography. He had a penchant for creating tall tales about his youth, as well as a casual disregard for fact in favor of the legend. The biography that he underwrote, The Life of a Man by Clement Wood, is replete with contradictions, omissions, and revisions. Where the facts remain vague, the myth oftentimes prevails, perhaps as he had intended. In addition to online sources, a bibliography of the publications referenced is provided at the end of this article. The memorials that Brinkley left scattered about the county are now aged after eight decades and often discolored or with fading inscriptions. Thousands pass by the tall stone “Aunt Sally” memorial each year, but few may note that it indicates her grave is nearby (across the Tuckaseigee River in Wike Cemetery) or know why it exists. Close to “Aunt Sally” is a North Carolina Highway Historical Marker, approved in 1994 and dedicated in June 1995. Both markers acknowledge Brinkley’s boyhood association with the community. Dr. John R. Brinkley erected this monument in memory of his mother, who died before he was six years old. The inscription, found at the base of the pedestal supporting the angel, reads “IN MEMORY OF / MY MOTHER / SARAH CANDACE / BURNETT / JUNE 17, 1859 / APR. 23, 1891.” In letters approximately three times larger, on the base below, he put his own name, “J.R. BRINKLEY M.D.” The angel-topped monument is located in Sylva in the (Old) Love Field Cemetery adjacent to the Lovedale Baptist Church parking lot. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 107 The monument to Brinkley’s mother, Sarah Candace Burnett, in the (Old) Love Chapel Cemetery off Highway 107, is not as visible because it is removed from the main road and obscured by surrounding foliage. Still, it is imposing with an angel dominating a high pedestal that together rise some ten feet. Despite what Brinkley’s authorized biography says, there is no indication that his father married Sarah Burnett. One biographer indicates that she was the niece of his father’s wife, Sarah “Aunt Sally” Mingus, who is buried with the elder Brinkley in Wike Cemetery and shares a memorial headstone. It was after Sarah Candace Burnett moved in with the Brinkleys that she gave birth to a son. Brinkley’s mother died when he was a child of less than six years old. Even though the 1900 census shows a Sarah Brinkley as widowed and head of household with a John R. Brinkley, age 14, enumerated as “son,” the latter designation is dubious as Sarah’s age is nine years younger than indicated on her headstone, and Brinkley dedicates Sarah Burnett’s memorial to his mother. Brinkley’s father, John R., Sr. (1828-1896) appears to have been married, or romantically involved, at least five times prior to his marriage to Aunt Sally, and had other children. Brinkley himself had a tempestuous relationship with his first wife, Sally Wike, of Tuckasegee, with whom he had three daughters—Wanda Marion (born 1907), Maxine (b. 1911), and Naomi Beryl (b. 1913). There may also have been a son that lived only a few days before dying in 1908. One of those daughters, Maxine Brinkley Shattuck (1911-2000), also has a stone at Wike Cemetery. One often forgotten headstone erected by Brinkley is to Louisa Jane Burnett Jenkins (1861-1902), who is buried with her husband Thomas Jenkins at the old Wesley’s Chapel Cemetery (now Sylva Assembly of God). The Jenkins stone has typical information on Louisa Jane and Thomas on one side. The back has the line “Erected by Doctor John R. Brinkley” under the name Jenkins. Louisa appears to have been the sister of Sarah Candace Burnett. In the (Old) Love Chapel Cemetery near Sarah Candace Burnett are separate markers to her parents: Hugh Thomas Burnett Feb. 17, 1826 – May 26, 1898 Mary Carolina Burnett Jan. 24, 1831 – Jan. 15, 1907 The 1880 census lists a Hue T. Burnett, age 54, and Polly C. Burnett, age 47, as a couple. This information apparently matches, as “Polly” was once a common nickname for “Mary.” In the household are Sarah C. Burnett, age 20, and Louisa J. Burnett, age 18, along with a 12-year old John. Marriage bonds indicate that Thomas Jenkins married Jane Burnett in 1883, with Thomas Burnett and Polly Burnett as witnesses. The Brinkley biography The Life of a Man mentions a John and Candace as being brother and sister. On a final note, according to Jackson County Heritage (Vol. I, pages 438-439), the monuments Brinkley commissioned for Aunt Sally and his mother were erected by Hugo Stein (1876-1946). A German immigrant who eventually settled in Sylva about 1902, Stein became a stone carver and ran a monument business in the vicinity of the old Cogdill Motor Company building. Advertisements in the Jackson County Journal in 1923 noted that he had been “20 years at Sylva in Business” and announced that he was “The Man Who Does the Work.” Readings (in chronological order) Clement Wood. The Life of a Man: A Biography of John R. Brinkley. Kansas City: Goshorn Publishing Co.: copyright 1934 by Mrs. Lillian Munal; published 1937. John R. Brinkley. Roads Courageous: Being a Compilation of Radio Talks Given Over the Radio Station XERA during the Fall and Winter Months of 1937 and 1938. [Asheville, N.C.]: J.R. Brinkley, 1938. Ansel Harlan Resler. “The Impact of John R. Brinkley on Broadcasting in the United States.” Ph.D. diss., Northwestern University, 1958. Gerald Carson. The Roguish World of Doctor Brinkley. New York: Rinehart, 1960. Gene Fowler and Bill Crawford. Border Radio. Austin, Texas: Texas Monthly Press, 1987. R. Alton Lee. The Bizarre Careers of John R. Brinkley. Lexington, Kentucky: University Press of Kentucky, 2002. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 108 Eric S. Juhnke. Quacks and Crusaders: The Fabulous Careers of John Brinkley, Norman Baker, and Harry Hoxsey. Lawrence, Kansas: University Press of Kansas, 2002. Pope Brock. Charlatan: America’s Most Dangerous Huckster, the Man Who Pursued Him, and the Age of Flimflam. New York: Crown Publishers, 2008. New Day, New Location for JCGS Holiday Dinner We’re trying something new this year! The annual Society Christmas covered-dish supper will be on December’s first Tuesday rather than second Thursday, and the location will be our usual meeting place – the Community Room in the Courthouse Wing of the Jackson County Library. So please join us at 6 p.m. Tuesday, December 5, in the Community Room for our holiday event. Bring a covered dish to share and plan to catch up with fellow JCGS members. The annual Society awards will be announced, and next year’s officers will be installed. Since the dinner will be at the Library, we’ll have the JCGS office open to allow members to pay their 2018 dues and purchase Society publications for Christmas gifts, including “Jackson County Heritage Volume I, which is on sale for $50 while supplies last. For more information, call the JCGS office at 631-2646 (Monday-Friday 10 a.m.-5 p.m.) or email jacksoncountygenealogy@gmail.com. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 109 JCGS Library Receives Important Collection It started with a phone call, and it ended with some 50 notebooks full of local genealogical information that are now available to the public in our JCGS research library. Volunteer Norma Clayton fielded the initial call from John Tayloe of Rural Hall. Would the Society be interested in accepting a large genealogical research collection compiled by a cousin of his wife?. He went on to describe notebooks full of information on familiar names, including Norton, Coward, Zachary, Nicholson and Rogers, which had been painstakingly put together by Trudy Hampton Adams, a granddaughter of Jonathan David Coward, known to those familiar with area history as one of the “Noble Nine” community leaders instrumental in founding what is now Western Carolina University. Several phone calls and emails later, John and his wife Judy appeared at the JCGS office with 10 large boxes crammed full of Jackson County’s past. That was in June; after weeks of sorting and filing, the Adams’ donation was incorporated into JCGS’s existing collections and is now available in our research library. Born Mary Gertrude Hampton, Trudy was born in Sylva but lived most of her life in Alabama. She died July 10, 2007, in Birmingham. Her mother was Annie Lou Coward (born 10 May 1893, in Cullowhee; died 9 Apr 1971, in Birmingham, Alabama). Annie was the daughter of Jonathan David Coward and Martha Lou Ellen Norton. Jonathan’s sister, Sallie Jane Coward, married William Preston Campbell Norton, another of the “Noble Nine.” Annie’s grandparents were Nathan Coward and Jane Rogers Coward, and William Norton and Susan Zachary; her great-grandparents were Col. John Zachary and Sarah Roberts, Barak Norton and Martha Nicholson, David Rogers and Polly Berry, and Jonathan Coward and Martha Hudson Coward. Annie married William Oscar Hampton (born 9 Nov 1892, in Hornbeak, Tennessee; died 7 Aug 1947, in Alton, Illinois) on 7 Apr 1922, at the home of Annie’s parents. Hampton, a career educator who earned his doctorate at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, was apparently employed at what was then Cullowhee Normal and Industrial School (now WCU) at the time he and Annie were married. In addition to Trudy, born 13 Sep 1923, Oscar and Annie Hampton had another daughter, Martha, born 15 Aug 1926, in Chapel Hill. Trudy’s son Casey Adams said his mother’s passion for genealogy grew out of her interest in her Coward forbears and from attending annual Coward reunions. Trudy edited the Coward newsletter, he said, and also managed the large Coward family tree that was displayed each year at the reunion, which most recently was held at the WCU picnic shelter. “Every year she asked for help to fill in the blank spots,” Casey said. Trudy was educated at the University of Montevallo in Montevallo, Alabama, and worked as an assistant to one of Birmingham’s premier orthopedic surgeons before she married Robert Abner Adams on 28 Aug 1949, in Wilton, Alabama. According to Casey, his parents met when Bob Adams, a newspaper photographer, was sent to take a photo of Trudy because she had won some sort of award. Trudy taught herself how to use a computer back in the floppy disk days, and learned to use the Internet to further her family history research. “When it came to genealogy, it had to be right,” Casey said, recalling a childhood spent following his mother through cemeteries and into courthouse basements in search of elusive deeds and marriage certificates. Casey, who now lives in Atlanta, also remembers summer visits to the mountains for the Coward and Norton reunions. “The Jarrett House was our go-to hotel every year,” he said. “We’d take time to drive along the (Blue Ridge) Parkway – I’m a mountain boy at heart.” Thanks to Trudy’s painstaking research, and the generosity of her family members who preserved and shared it, local residents may be able to fill in some of the missing gaps in their own family trees. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 110 Left to right: Robert Abner Adams, Casey Adams, and Mary Gertrude “Trudy” Hampton Adams Reminder Dues for 2018 membership are now due. Memberships are for a calendar year. Please be sure to pay your renewal to continue to receive your JTJ. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 111 1880 Jackson County Census Records ED: We continue in this issue the Cullowhee Township. Abstracted in 2017 by Sanji Talley Watson. The records were abstracted as written. Enumerator had problems with reporting place of birth for some people. Pressley, Thomas C. 8 W – Son NC NC NC Fannie 6 W – Daughter “ “ “ Ella M. 4 W -- Daughter “ “ “ Robert F. 1 W -- Son “ “ “ 10-10 Pressley, Clingman 35 W – Farmer NC NC NC Tilda 34 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Mary A. 15 W – Daughter – Works in house “ “ “ William R. 13 W – Son – Works on farm “ “ “ Fidelia Mc 12 W – Son – Works on farm “ “ “ McMonroe 10 W – Son – Works on farm “ “ “ Nancy J. 7 W – Daughter TN NC NC Andrew Mc 6 W – Son NC NC NC Ida 5 W – Daughter “ “ “ Flora C. 4 W – Daughter “ “ “ Queen Ester 2 W – Daughter “ “ “ Andrew 85 W -- Father “ “ “ Nancy 66 W – Mother “ “ “ 11-11 Ash, Hiram 47 W – Farmer NC NC NC Sarah 49 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Mirah M. 22 W – Daughter – Works in house “ “ “ Milas N. 14 W – Son – Works on farm “ “ “ Robert C. 11 W – Son “ “ “ John W. 8 W – Son “ “ “ 12-12 Shelton, Eliott W. 36 W – Farmer NC NC NC Martha L. 35 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Dovy B. 11 W – Daughter “ “ “ George W. 10 W – Son “ “ “ Lucy A. 7 W – Daughter “ “ “ 13-13 Hooper, Michael B. 25 W – Farmer NC NC NC Minta C. 18 W – Keeping house “ “ “ Lewis F. 2 W – Son “ “ “ Mary J. 1 W -- Daughter “ “ “ 14-14 Bryson, Dniel J. 64 W – Farmer NC SC NC Loucinda 63 W – Wife –Keeping house NC NC NC Buchanan, Mary 20 W – Grand Daughter – Works in house “ “ “ 15-15 Frady, Miniard W. 19 W – Working on farm GA GA NC Jane A. 17 W – Keeping house NC NC NC Hughey, Jane 65 W --Aunt “ “ “ 16-16 Warren, William A. 43 W -- Carpenter NC NC NC Nancy A. 33 W – Keeping house NC NC SC John H. 19 W – Son – Works on farm NC NC NC James U. 14 W – Son – Works on farm “ “ “ Nancy A. 10 W – Daughter “ “ “ William H. 9 W – Son “ “ “ Zonia A. 6 W – Daughter “ “ “ Robert Lee 3 W – Son “ “ “ Reynold, Eliza J. 51 W – Laborer SC SC SC Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 112 17-17 Chastain, Elvira 25 W – Laborer GA NC SC James M. 13 W – Son – Works on farm GA GA GA Jennitha 8 W -- Daughter “ “ “ Mima E. 5 W -- Daughter “ “ “ Lavinia A. 3 W – Daughter NC GA GA 18-18 Bryson, David C. 33 W – Farmer NC NC NC Virinna 27 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Andrew C. 10 W – Son – Works on farm “ “ “ Horatio H. 8 W – Son “ “ “ Johnathan H. 6 W – Son “ “ “ William O. 3 W – Son “ “ “ 19-19 Bryson, Andrew 70 W – Farmer NC SC NC Callie 69 W – Wife – Keeping house NC TN NC Allman, Farie 11 W – Nephew – At home NC NC NC Moffit, Alie E. 40 W – Laborer – Works in home “ “ “ Mary M. C. 3 W – Daughter “ “ “ 20-20 Fox, Nelson 30 W – Farmer NC VA VA Margaret J. 29 W – Wife –Keeping house NC NC NC Robert N. 9 W – Son “ “ “ Samuel T. 6 W – Son “ “ “ Marion E. 5 W – Son “ “ “ Sarah A. 3 W – Daughter “ “ “ Mary 1 W – Daughter “ “ “ 21-21 Watson, Elias M. 32 W – Works on farm GA SC SC Martha J. 33 W – Wife – Keeping house NC SC SC Elvira 13 W – Daughter NC GA SC Harvey F. 8 W – Son SC GA SC Elias M. 5 W – Son “ “ “ John W. 3 W – Son “ “ “ Daisy T. E. M. J. 6/12 W – Daughter “ “ “ 22-22 Fox, Nulcie 37 W – Works on farm NC NC VA Anner 62 W – Mother – Keeping house VA VA VA Mary T. 22 W – Sister – Working in house NC VA VA 23-23 Davis, Daniel D. 54 W – Farmer Wales Wales Wales Catherine E. 38 W – Wife – Keeping house NC TN NC Ella M. 14 W – Daughter – At school NC WALES NC Carrie S. 12 W – Daughter – At school “ “ “ Cora R. 11 W – Daughter – At school “ “ “ Ina O. 6 W – Daughter “ “ “ Daisy D. 3 W – Daughter “ “ “ Corbin, Wade 22 W – Servant NC NC NC Allen, Violet 23 B – Servant “ “ “ 24-24 Wilson, Margaret M. 40 W – Works on farm NC NC NC Sarah H. 13 W – Daughter – Works on farm “ “ “ Pauline 11 W – Daughter – Works on farm “ “ “ Rosa P. 7 W – Daughter “ “ “ 25-25 Brown, Joseph L. 35 B – Works on farm NC VA VA Amy E. 33 B – Wife – Keeping house NC NC NC Sarah E. 13 B – Daughter – Works in house “ “ “ Julia A. 9 B – Daughter “ “ “ Mary C. 6 B -- Daughter “ “ “ 26-26 Mathis, Catherine 40 W NC NC NC Jefferson D. 18 W – Son – Works on farm NC TN NC Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 113 Annah B. 6 W – Daughter “ “ “ 27-27 Frady, Richard B. 19 W – Works on farm NC NC NC Martha L. 19 W – Wife – Keeping house NC TN NC Rebecca L. 1 W -- Daughter NC NC NC 28-28 Taylor, Andrew K. 51 W – Farmer NC Ireland VA 29-29 Coggins, Wiley F. 24 W – Works on farm NC NC NC Eva A. 22 W – Wife – House keeper NC GA NC Lathia I. 2 W – Daughter NC NC NC 30-30 Bryson, William S. 19 W – Working on farm GA NC GA Rhoda J. 17 W – Wife – Keeping house NC NC NC 31-31 Pressley, David S. 46 W – Farmer NC NC NC Clarissa E. 39 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Doctor H. 19 W – Son – Works on farm “ “ “ David M. 17 W – Works on farm “ “ “ Marthy E. 14 W – Daughter – Works in house “ “ “ Sarah A. 13 W – Daughter – Works in house “ “ “ Lula A. 11 W – Daughter – Works in house “ “ “ Henry D. 8 W – Son “ “ “ Pinkie A. 6 W – Daughter “ “ “ Rositta 2 W – Daughter “ “ “ Robert 1 W – Son “ “ “ 32-32 Ash, Thomas 53 W – Farmer NC NC NC Sarah 46 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Catherine 24 W – Daughter – Works in house “ “ “ Amos J. 20 W – Son – Works on farm “ “ “ Bartlet M. 13 W – Son – Works on farm “ “ “ John A. 10 W – Son – Works on farm “ “ “ Mary E. 5 W – Daughter “ “ “ 33-33 Bennett, Montiville 35 W – Farmer NC SC NC Marthy J. 37 W – Wife – Keeping house NC NC VA Samuel 19 W – Son – Works on farm NC NC NC Sarah 18 W – Daughter “ “ “ Louisa 14 W – Daughter – Works in house “ “ “ Josephine 12 W – Daughter – Works in house “ “ “ Salina 11 W – Daughter – Works in house “ “ “ Jane 9 W – Daugher “ “ “ Hanes 4 W – Son “ “ “ Tabitha 2 W – Son “ “ “ Adaline 21 W – Daughter – Works in house “ “ “ James C. 5 W – Grandson “ “ “ Callie A. 1/12 W – Granddaughter “ “ “ 34-34 Bennet, John W. 67 W – Farmer SC VA SC Lucinda 46 W – Wife – Keeping house TN --- --- Roxanna C. 14 W – Daughter – Keeping house NC SC TN Holliman H. 12 W – Son – Works on farm “ “ “ Mary M. 25 W – Daughter – Works on farm NC NC TN John T. 2 W – Grandson NC NC NC Knight, James 74 W – Miller SC SC SC 35-35 Tilley, Lewis H. 58 W – Farmer NC NC NC Hanna 52 W – Wife – Keeping house TN TN TN Jane 27 W – Daughter – Works in house NC NC TN George O. 23 W – Son – Works on farm “ “ “ Elizabeth 21 W – Daughter – Works on farm “ “ “ Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 114 Amanda 19 W – Daughter – Works on farm “ “ “ Margaret 17 W – Daughter – Works on farm “ “ “ Rebecca 13 W – Daughter – Works on farm “ “ “ Lillie B. 10 W – Daughter “ “ “ Carver, James 15 W – Laborer NC NC TN 36-36 Hooper, Coleman C. 29 W – Farmer NC NC NC Pollie A 30 W – Wife – Keeping hoise NC NC TN Thomas H. 6 W – Son NC NC NC Benjiman H. 4 W – Son “ “ “ George C. 2 W – Son “ “ “ Thomas R. 24 W – Cousin – Laborer “ “ “ 37-37 Mathis, John N. 79 W – Farmer NC NC NC Elizabeth 83 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Nancy A. 39 W – Daughter – Works on farm “ “ “ Mary M. 37 W – Daughter – Shoe maker “ “ “ Mary J. 19 W – Granddaughter – Works on farm “ “ “ Safronia 17 W – Granddaughter – Works on farm “ “ “ Sarah A. 12 W – Granddaughter NC GA NC John A. 10 W – Grandson – Works on farm “ “ “ 38-38 Gregory, Jesse T. 46 W – Works on farm NC NC NC Annie C. 44 W – Works on farm “ “ “ Emma M. 9 W – Daughter “ “ “ Henry J. 7 W – Son “ “ “ John W. 4 W – Son “ “ “ Joseph A. 2 W – Son “ “ “ James A. 2 W – Son “ “ “ 39-39 Tilley, Horatis H. 29 W – Farmer NC NC TN Ingabo E. 28 W – Wife – Keeping house NC NC NC Margaret C. 7 W – Daughter “ “ “ William D. 5 W – Son “ “ “ Mary C. 3 W – Daughter “ “ “ Not named 3/12 W – Daughter “ “ “ 40-40 Tilley, John W. 32 W – Farmer NC NC TN Susan L. 31 W – Wife – Keeping house NC NC NC Joseph O. 6 W – Son “ “ “ Johnathan W. 4 W – Son “ “ “ Hannah E. 2 W – Daughter “ “ “ Hattie B. 3/12 W – Daughter “ “ “ 41-41 Bryson, Allen F. 32 W – Farmer NC SC NC Matilda A. 27 W – Wife – Keeping house NC NC GA Weston M. 11 W – Son – Works on farm NC NC NC Mary L. 9 W – Daughter “ “ “ Margaret J. 8 W – Daughter “ “ “ Daniel A. 6 W – Son “ “ “ Gilbert B. 4 W – Son “ “ “ Joanna 3 W – Daughter “ “ “ Javan 2 W – Son “ “ “ 42-42 Leopard, Thomas M. 50 W – House Carpenter SC SC SC Elizabeth 44 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Martha 24 W – Daughter – Works in house “ “ “ Whitfield 21 W – Son – Works on farm “ “ “ John M. 16 W – Son – Works on farm “ “ “ Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 115 Descendants of William Solomon Parker, Sr. ED: If you have any corrections or additions to this article, please feel free to contact us with them. 139. vi. Tracy Marcus McCall, b. January 15, 1865, Transylvania County North Carolina; d. January 25, 1935, Transylvania County, North Carolina. 140. vii. John Ansel McCall, b. March 19, 1858, Transylvania County North Carolina; d. April 05, 1931, Pickens County, South Carolina. viii. George Washington Abraham Lincoln McCall, b. March 02, 1861; d. March 17, 1939; m. Nancy Ann Shepard; b. June 02, 1861; d. August 29, 1933. 47. Rebecca Owen was born 1830, and died 1889 in Transylvania County, North Carolina. She married William Riley Garren, son of William Garren and Sarah Lanning. He was born 1827, and died 1903. Child of Rebecca Owen and William Garren is: i. Lavina Elvinia Garren, m. Jesse Miles McCalL, March 14, 1869, Transylvania County, North Carolina; b. August 29, 1849; d. February 28, 1937. 48. Andrew Jackson Owen was born May 03, 1831 in Buncombe County, North Carolina, and died September 18, 1905 in Jackson County, North Carolina. He married Mary Ann McCall January 05, 1854 in Henderson County, North Carolina, daughter of John McCall and Platima Glazener. She was born January 09, 1832 in Buncombe County, North Carolina, and died March 20, 1915 in Jackson County, North Carolina. Children of Andrew Owen and Mary McCall are: i. Dillard Love Owen, m. Tecora McCall; b. July 1896, North Carolina. ii. John H. Owen, b. March 09, 1871; d. June 11, 1894; m. Samantha E. Owen, July 25, 1892; b. March 28, 1874; d. February 19, 1949, Transylvania County, North Carolina. iii. Lucinda Adeline Owen, b. 1869; d. 1935; m. (1) Floyd Queen; m. (2) Floyd Bracken. 141. iv. William Jackson Owen, b. March 15, 1861; d. March 06, 1936, Transylvania County, North Carolina. v. Angeline Owen, b. October 20, 1853; d. 1932, Haywood County, North Carolina; m. Carson C. Galloway, March 01, 1876; b. May 17, 1853; d. 1916, Haywood County, North Carolina. 142. vi. Pauline Evaline Owen, b. February 13, 1855, Haywood County, North Carolina; d. December 11, 1929, Jackson County, North Carolina. 143. vii. Isaiah Owen, b. January 22, 1859, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. July 14, 1935, Jackson County, North Carolina. 144. viii. James Milford Owen, b. January 13, 1865, Transylvania County, North Carolina; d. April 04, 1947, Jackson County, North Carolina. 145. ix. Mary Caroline Owen, b. February 10, 1867; d. October 22, 1932. 146. x. Martha Jane Owen, b. October 25, 1873, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. May 05, 1959, Jackson County, North Carolina. 147. xi. Thomas Clingman Owen, b. February 25, 1857; d. May 02, 1930. 49. Susannah Owen was born 1834, and died 1863 in Jackson County, North Carolina. She married John Chasteen McCall February 28, 1858, son of John McCall and Platima Glazener. He was born October 02, 1836, and died 1913 in Transylvania County North Carolina. Child of Susannah Owen and John McCall is: i. Mary L. McCall, b. 1865, Transylvania County North Carolina; d. February 12, 1963, Transylvania County North Carolina; m. Harvey Sylvanis McCall, Abt. 1883; b. April 14, 1863, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. June 16, 1948, Transylvania County, North Carolina. 50. Francis Marion Owen was born February 02, 1837 in Haywood County, North Carolina, and died November 24, 1923 in Jackson County, North Carolina. He married (1) Elizabeth Caroline Wood, daughter of Andrew Wood and Jane Henderson. She was born 1844, and died August 05, 1894 in Jackson County, North Carolina. He Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 116 married (2) Margaret Jane Wood December 29, 1856 in Henderson County, North Carolina, daughter of Andrew Wood and Jane Henderson. She was born June 20, 1841 in Haywood County, North Carolina, and died September 15, 1882 in Jackson County, North Carolina. He married (3) Violet Elizabeth Brown March 13, 1884 in Jackson County, North Carolina, daughter of Levi Brown and Martha Trannwell. She was born June 04, 1850 in Jackson County, North Carolina, and died in Jackson County, North Carolina. He married (4) Nell Ann Middleton November 16, 1886 in Tuckasegee, Jackson County, North Carolina, daughter of William Nathan Middleton and Mary Polly Picklesimer. She was born October 21, 1852 in Haywood County, North Carolina, and died March 01, 1937 in Jackson County, North Carolina. Notes for Francis Marion Owen: Transylvania County, North Carolina, Record of Wills, Book 3 pp 129-130 State of North Carolina County of Transylvania I, Marion Owen, of said State and County, and of Gloucester Township, being of sound mind and disposing memory, but considering the uncertainty of my earthly existence, do make, publish and declare this to be my last Will and Testament: FIRST -- My Executor, hereinafter named, shall give my body a decent burial, suitable to the wishes of my friends and relatives, and pay all funeral expenses, together with all my just debts, out of the first moneys which may come into his hands belonging to my estate: SECOND -- I give and devise unto my son, Spurgeon Owen, in fee simple forever, all rights, interests or equities, which I may own at my death in and to any lands, situate, lying and being in said State and County: THIRD -- I give and bequeath unto my said son, Spurgeon Owen, all money, or moneys, live stock, farming tolls, household and kitchen furniture, notes or other evidence of debt due me, provisions on hand, and andy (and) all other personal property of every kind and description which I may own at my death: FOURTH -- I hereby constitute and appoint my trusty friend, Roland Owen, my lawful executor to all intents and purposes, to execute this my last Will and Testament, according to the true intent and meaning of same, and every part and clause thereof -- hereby revoking and declaring null and void all other Wills and Testaments by me heretofore made. In witness, I, Marion Owen, do hereunto set my hand and affix my private seal, this the 4th day of May 1917. Marion Owen (his mark) (SEAL) Signed, sealed and delivered, published and declared, by the said Marion Owen to be his last will and testament in the presence of us, who, at his request and in his presence, (and in the presence of each other) do subscribe our names as witnesses hereto. Witnesses: D. L. English Coz Paxton O. W. Clayton North Carolina In the Superior Court Transylvania County Before N. A. Miller, C. S. C. Now comes Roland Owen, Executor named in a paper writing purporting to be the last will and testament of Marion Owen, deceased, and exhibits the said paper writing before me, the undersigned Clerk of the Superior Court of Transylvania County, and the due execution of said paper writing as the said last Will and Testament is proved by the oath and examination of said paper writing as the said last Will and Testament is proved by oath and examination of Coz Paxton and D. L. English, the subscribing witmesses thereto, who, being duly sworn, doth depose and say, and each for himself deposeth and sayeth that he is a subscribing witness to the paper writing now shown him purporting to be the last Will and Testament of Marion Owen: that the said Marion Owen in the presences of this deponeth, subscribe his name at the end of said paper writing now shown as aforesaid, did, at the time of subscribing his name as aforesaid, declared the said paper writing so subscribed by him and exhibited to be his last Will and Testament and this deponeth did thereupon subscribe his name at the end of said Will as an Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 117 attesting witness thereto, and at the request and in the presence of said testator: That at the said time when said testator subscribed his name to the said last Will and Testament as aforesaid and at the time of this deponeth subscribed his name as attesting witness thereto as aforesaid the said Marion Owen was of sound mind and memory of full age to execute a will, and was not under any restraint to the knowledge, information or belief of this deponent; and further these deponents say not. Children of Francis Owen and Margaret Wood are: 148. i. Annie Caroline Owen, b. March 11, 1870, Jackson County, North Carolina. 149. ii. Rhoda Haseltine Owen, b. December 18, 1857, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. April 10, 1939, Jackson County, North Carolina. iii. James W. Owen, b. April 06, 1860, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. February 22, 1935, Transylvania County, North Carolina; m. Mary Galloway. 150. iv. Marintha Josephine Owen, b. January 27, 1863, Transylvania County, North Carolina; d. February 01, 1952, Transylvania County, North Carolina. v. Malinda J. Owen, b. Abt. 1865, Transylvania County, North Carolina. 151. vi. Mary Magdaline Owen, b. April 23, 1867, Transylvania County, North Carolina; d. October 24, 1952, Transylvania County, North Carolina. vii. Linda Owen, b. 1874, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. Transylvania County, North Carolina; m. James E. Bracken; b. July 05, 1879, Transylvania County, North Carolina; d. May 27, 1929, Transylvania County, North Carolina. 152. viii. Rosey Lilly Owen, b. October 05, 1875, Transylvania County North Carolina; d. July 22, 1969, Transylvania County North Carolina. Child of Francis Owen and Nell Middleton is: 153. ix. Spurgeon Owen, b. June 01, 1888; d. 1969. 51. William J. Parker was born September 18, 1836 in Henderson County, North Carolina, and died January 13, 1897 in Christian County, Missouri. He married Sareptha A. Wade in North Carolina. She was born December 22, 1828 in South Carolina, and died March 07, 1921 in Christian County, Missouri. Children of William Parker and Sareptha Wade are: 154. i. Lavinia Parker, b. 1873, Cherokee County, North Carolina. 155. ii. George B. Parker, b. March 1869; d. 1945, Springfield, Green County, Missouri. 156. iii. Sarah E. Parker, b. June 1863, Cherokee County, North Carolina; d. Springfield, Green County, Missouri. 157. iv. Victoria Caroline Parker, b. September 06, 1857, North Carolina; d. September 17, 1931, Clever, Christian County, Missouri. v. John M. Parker, b. May 1861, North Carolina; d. Missouri; m. Mary Ann Parker; b. February 06, 1863, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. May 20, 1924, Jackson County, North Carolina. vi. Willis Parker, b. 1859. 52. Mary Nancy Emmaline Parker was born 1839 in North Carolina. She married Williamson H. James, son of Asa James and Elizabeth Unknown. He was born 1829 in North Carolina. Children of Mary Parker and Williamson James are: i. Lycurgus James, b. 1859. ii. Henry James, b. 1861. iii. Elbert James, b. 1864. iv. Elenora James, b. 1869. v. Harriet J. James, b. 1872. vi. Mary E. James, b. 1875. 53. Alfred Webb Parker was born January 15, 1833 in Haywood County, North Carolina, and died June 21, 1908 in Jackson County, North Carolina. He married Francis Ann Parkes, daughter of Fleming Parks and Bethelum Bly. She was born March 04, 1838 in Brunswick, Georgia, and died September 05, 1896 in Jackson County, North Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 118 Carolina. Notes for Alfred Webb Parker: Company G 62nd Regiment N.C. Troops Parker, Alfred Webb, Private Born on January 15, 1833. Resided in Jackson County and was by occupation a farmer prior to enlisting in Jackson county at age 29, July 11, 1862, for the war. Reported present through April 30, 19863. Deserted at Cumberland Gap, Tennessee, June 20, 1863. Children of Alfred Parker and Francis Parkes are: 158. i. Sarah Louise Parker, b. November 09, 1854, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. September 02, 1931, Transylvania County, North Carolina. 159. ii. John Albert Grant Parker, b. January 19, 1866, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. March 30, 1948, Jackson County, North Carolina. 160. iii. Martha Jane Parker, b. August 15, 1852, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. May 21, 1942, Jackson County, North Carolina. 161. iv. Mary Ann Parker, b. February 06, 1863, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. May 20, 1924, Jackson County, North Carolina. v. George Madison Parker, b. Abt. 1863, Jackson County, North Carolina; m. Elsie Wood, August 21, 1883, Jackson County, North Carolina; b. 1867, Jackson County, North Carolina. vi. Malinda A. Parker, b. 1868; m. Ed Bell; b. 1869. 162. vii. William Alfred Parker, b. December 03, 1870, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. December 16, 1956, Transylvania County, North Carolina. viii. Aretta Parker, b. 1875. ix. Alice R. Parker, b. 1876; m. John Bowers. x. Houston S. Parker, b. January 07, 1879; d. December 25, 1949; m. Levie McCall. 163. xi. Nancy Ellen Parker, b. August 27, 1883, Jackson County, North Carolina; d. January 23, 1962, Transylvania County, North Carolina. xii. Laura Parker, b. Abt. 1858; m. Marion McCall. xiii. Victoria Parker, b. Abt. 1863; m. Unknown Broom. 54. Levada Jane Parker was born February 07, 1840 in Macon County, North Carolina, and died Bef. 1890. She married Coleman Asbury Ashe August 25, 1857 in Jackson County, North Carolina, son of Henry Ashe and Ruby Jennings. He was born October 30, 1834 in White County, Georgia, and died June 17, 1919 in Jackson County, North Carolina. Notes for Coleman Asbury Ashe: 1880 US Census -- NC -- Jackson County, River -- T9-0969, p.302B Colman Ashe Self M W W 46 NC Hulda Dau F S W 21 NC Rebeca Dau F S W 20 NC John Son M S W 18 NC William Son M S W 17 NC Henry Son M S W 14 NC Wesly Son M S W 12 NC Laura Dau F S W 8 NC Marion Son M S W 7 NC Silvano Son M S W 4 NC Company G, 62nd Regiment N.C. Troops Ash, Coleman A., Corporal Born in Georgia and enlisted in Jackson County at age 27, July 11, 1862, for the war. Mustered in as Corporal. Reported present through June 30, 1863. No further records. Survived the war. Children of Levada Parker and Coleman Ashe are: i. Sis Ashe, d. January 04, 1934, Jackson County North Carolina; m. Charlie Beck. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 119 1945 Jackson County Death Certificates of Persons Born 1900 – 1945 [Key to reading the following: Name of deceased; Date of birth; Place of birth; 1945 date of death; Father’s name; Father’s place of birth; Mother’s name; Mother’s place of birth; Informant’s name; Informant’s address; Cemetery. Abstracted by Sanji Talley Watson in the Jackson County Register of Deeds Office 2016.] Barkers Creek Brooks, Eleanor; 2 Jan 1945; Barkers Creek; 3 Jan; William C. Brooks; Barkers Creek; Leala Estes; Gay; Cornelius Brooks; Whittier; ng Brooks, Johnnie; 13 Jan 1945; ng; 13 Jan; Floyd Brooks; NC; Margaret Green; NC; ng; ng; Barkers Creek Brooks, Joseph; 13 Feb 1945; Barkers Creek; 19 Feb; Worley Brooks; Jackson Co.; Ruby Jones; Jackson Co.; ng; ng; Barkers Creek Farmer, Leata Bell; 26 Nov 1945; ng; 26 Nov; James Bedford Farmer; Qualla; Manilla Farmer; Ellijay; ng; ng; Olivet Canada Broom, Mack Carol; 25 Sep 1945; Argura; 27 Sep; Lewey Broom; Argura; Mattie Ammons; Macon Co.; Lewey Broom; Argura; Broom Phillips, Betty Rose; 9 Feb 1915; ng; 9 Feb; Sherman Phillips; Jackson Co.; Berdie Cumile Ashe; Tuckasegee; ng; ng; Phillips Wood, Oscar Delano; 17 Sep 1945; Wolf Mountain; 18 Nov; Oscar Wood; Tuckasegee; Christine Shelton; Wolf Mountain; Bud Shelton; Wolf Mountain; Wolf Creek Cashiers Rice, Infant Girl; 9 Jun 1945; ng; 9 Jun; Barney Rice; Jackson Co.; Roxey Kelly; SC; Mrs. Jhon Robinson; Barkers Creek; Keener Cullowhee Deitz, Vernon; 1 Nov 1927; Jackson Co.; 27 Oct; Sylvester Monroe Deitz; Jackson Co.; Verda Cope; Jackson Co.; Monroe Deitz; Cullowhee; Cullowhee Taylor, Delas Alexander; 11 Dec 1944; Speedwell; 24 Dec 1944; Claud H. Taylor; Jackson Co.; Alice A. Pressley; Speedwell; Claud H. Taylor; Speedwell; Speedwell Dillsboro Pangle, Robert; 15 Mar 1912; Dillsboro; 22 Dec; Lee Pangle; Greens Creek; Katherine Sutton; Dillsboro; Tom Keever; Dillsboro; Locust Field Robinson, Robert; 5 Apr 1945; Dillsboro; 5 Apr; Julius Robinson; Dillsboro; Annie Coggins; Jackson Co.; Julius Robinson; Dillsboro; Long Branch Greens Creek Cabe, Magalon; 5 Oct 1945; Greens Creek; 5 Oct; James Edgar Cabe; Jackson Co.; Albert Rhinehart; Jackson Co.; ng; ng; ng Crane, Gordan Lenard; 3 Feb 1934; Dorsey, Swain Co. GA; 16 Jun; J. W. Crane; Ball Gound, GA; Iva Harron; Dorsey, Swain Co., GA; J. W. Crane; Barkers Creek; Old Savannah Hall, Ruby D.; 17 Feb 1924; Greens Creek; 28 Nov (Burial Date); Richard Hall; NC; Mammie McHan; NC; Richard Hall; Greens Creek; Old Savannah Trantham, Thelma Jane; 15 Mar 1941; Greens Creek; 2 Sep; Author Trantham; Greens Creek; Octa Buchanan; Greens Creek; ng; ng; Greens Creek Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 120 Hamburg Jennings, Infant Girl; 28 Feb 1945; ng; 28 Feb; Glenn Jennings; ng; Marie Johnson; Oregon; ng; ng; Glenville Moore, William Henry; 9 days; NC; 26 Feb; Vass Moore; SC; Maxine Bryson; NC; Vass Moore; Glenville; Glenville Watson, Ruby; 30 days; Glenville; 26 May; Zeb Watson; NC; Elzie Hooper; NC; Zeb Watson; Glenville; Glenville Young, Claude 2 Feb 1929; Glenville; 17 Aug; Ted C. Young; Glenville; Vera Bryson; Glenville; Ted C. Young; Glenville; Glenville Mountain Carroll, Clyde Lewis; 3 Jun 1911; Glenville; 30 Sep; Emery Carroll; Erastus; Hettie Me Hoxit; Glenville; Emery Carroll; Erastus; Pine Creek Stewart, James Lloyd; 2 Dec 1945; Sylva; 9 Dec; Albert Stewart; Erastus; Bonnie Stewart; Erastus; Bonnie Stewart; Erastus; Pine Creek Qualla Hyatt, Paul Edward; 3 Nov 1944; Whittier; 5 Aug; Edward Lee Hyatt; Whittier; Mollie Lillian Williams; Whittier; Edward Lee Hyatt; Whittier; Sherrill Stepp, Infant; 8 Mar 1945; Whittier; 10 Mar; William Carl Stepp; Buncombe Co.; Nellie Rogers; Haywood Co.; W. C. Stepp; Whittier; Ward Worley, Edgar Joseph; 16 Oct 1916; Jackson Co.; 7 Nov 1944; David Worley; Webster; Bessie Bumgarner; Wilmot; Dave Worley; Webster; Worley’s Chapel River Ashe, Edward L.; 18 D; Tuckasegee; 1 Jan; F. F. Ashe; Tuckasegee; Pricilla Watson; Tuckasegee; F. F. Ashe; Tuckasegee; Middleton Ashe, Othella; 2 Sep 1945; Tuckasegee; 2 Sep; S. H. Ashe; NC; Myrtle Melton; NC; ng; ng; Canada Luker, Fesher; 16 Oct 1945; ng; 16 Oct; Alvin Luker; NC; Vera Brown; NC; ng; ng; Shook Luker, Nellie; 16 Aug 1945; ng; 1 Aug; Ralph Luker; NC; Della Mae Luker; NC; ng; ng; Hooper {ED: Shook} Savannah Bishop, Infant Boy: 7 Jul 1945; Gay; 7 Jul; ng; ng; Beatrice Bishop; Gay; Mrs. W. D. Bishop; Gay; Zion Hill Deitz, Linda Lou; 23 Dec 1944; Gay; 24 Jun; David Deitz; Gay; Ruby Ellen Higdon; Gay; Mrs. R. O. Higdon; Gay; Wesleyanna Franks, Albert Louis; 2 Jun 1945; Gay; 13 Jul; Jimmy Franks; Macon Co.; Ester Pressley; Jackson Co.; Rosella Franks; Gay; Zion Hill Franks, Mary Ann; 5 Oct 1935; Jackson Co.; 25 Nov; Tilman Franks; Jackson Co.; Jessie T. Franks; Madison Co.; Tilman Franks; Savannah; Savannah Hyatt, Geraldine 8 Sep 1939; Gay; 12 Sep; Perry R. Hyatt; Gay; Dorthy Green; Gay; Mrs. P. R. Hyatt; Gay; Sion Hill Scotts Creek Mathis, Carl 17 Feb 1945; ng; 17 Feb; Rufus Mathis; Jackson Co.; Fany Frady; ng; ng; ng; Crawford Sylva Ashe, Delma Jean; 30 Dec 1945; Sylva; 30 Dec; Virgil N. Ashe; Jackson Co.; Hulda R. Golden; Jackson Co.; Virgil N. Ashe; Tuckasegee; Shook Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 121 Bryson, John Franklin; 9 Jul 1915; Washington; 2 Aug; J. W. Bryson; Cullowhee; Mary Ethel Buchanan; Haywood Co.; J. W. Bryson; Sylva; Lindale Bryson, George William, Jr.; 23 Jul 1914; Sylva; 3 Sep 1944; George W. Bryson; Sylva; Annie Lee Freeman; Sylva; Mrs. Geo. Bryson; Sylva; Parris Bryson, Sadie Catherine Underwood; w/o Walter; 1 Dec 1908; Young Harris, GA; 16 Apr; James Underwood; Cullowhee; Dovie Birch, Hiawasee, GA; Walter Bryson; Erastus; Pine Creek Bumgarner, Floyd K.; h/o Viola; 10 Jul 1909; Cashiers; 2 Sep; Elbert A. Bumgarner; Cashiers; Octavia Brown; Tuckasegee; Mrs. Homer Aldridge; Tryon; Lovedale Dobbin, Johnie Henry; 3 Jun 1920; Yadkin Co.; 2 Mar; Thomas M. Dobbin; Yadkin Co.; Bertha Hanes; Wilkes Co.; Mrs. Geneva Stokes; Winston-Salem, NC; “near his home.” Ensley, Infant Girl; 9 Jun 1945; Sylva; Roosevelt Ensley; Sylva; Geneva Painter; Sylva; ng; ng; Lovedale Ensley, Charles Linden; 29 Aug 1942; Sylva; 25 Jul; Dee Ensley; Tuckasegee; Mabel Ashe; Sylva; Dee Ensley; Sylva; Ashe Frizzell, Elsie Evelyn; 15 Jun 1933; Jackson Co.; 29 Jun; Roosevelt Frizzell; Jackson Co.; Ada Buchanan; Jackson Co.; Theo, Frizzell; Webster; Stillwell Grant, Infant Boy; 11 May 1945; ng; 11 May; John W. Grant; NC; Eula Franks; Swain Co.; ng; ng; Bryson City Howse, Harriet Lee; 3 Apr 1942; Alabama; 9 Dec; James C. Howse; ng; Emily Lou Callahan; ng; ng; ng; Bryson City Jennings, Mary Alice; w/o Glenn; 1 Aug 1921; Montana; 2 Mar; Matthew Johnson; ng; Mary Rice; ng; Glenn Jennings; Glenville; Glenville Lanning, Jackie Bernard; 5 Nov 1935; Glenville; 3 Jun; Frank Lanning; Glenville; Geneva McCall; Cashiers; Frank Lanning; Glenville; Glenville Mitchell, James Edward; 1 Sep 1945; Sylva; 1 Sep; Burke H. Mitchell; Greensboro, NC; Lazelle Dillard; Sylva; Burke H. Mitchell; Sylva; Dillard Sellers, Margaret Louise; w/o Pvt. Homer; 28 Jan 1921; Jackson Co.; 14 Jan; Thomas Lanning; Jackson Co.; Cora Gates; Jackson Co.; Thomas Lanning; Dillsboro; Franklin, Macon Co. Wortham, Willie Mae; w/o Carl; 4 May 1916; Sylva; 19 Apr; W. M. Jamison; Jackson Co.; Etta Warren Jamison; Buncombe Co.; W. M. Jamison; Sylva; Keener Webster Carpenter, Annie Dee; 23 Oct 1942; Jackson Co.; ng (1945); Bruce Carpenter; Jackson Co.; Aileen Cagle; Jackson Co.; Bruce Carpenter; Sylva; Cagle Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 122 Uncle Hubert Bryson – Baptizing on Johns Creek – early 1950s This was given to the society for publication by JCGS Vice-President, Norma Bryson Clayton. Hopeful that she will allow us to publish more of her stories. This photo made is the early 1950s is of a Johns Creek Baptist Church baptizing at the Hute Moffett bridge on Caney Fork. The man in the water with his back to the camera is the Reverend Hubert Bryson, my Daddy’s youngest brother. He was a well-known Baptist preacher in this area leading many to Christ with his persuasive messages. He was very knowledgeable about the Bible and a dynamic preacher. Older people to this day remember his sermons and powerful messages. He was also a very musically talented man – singing and playing the guitar. As a young man he was offered a contract to sing on the Louisiana Hayride. (For those of you who do not know - “The Louisiana Hayride was a radio and later television country music show broadcast from the Shreveport Municipal Memorial Auditorium in Shreveport, Louisiana, that during its heyday from 1948 to 1960 helped to launch the careers of some of the greatest names in American country and western music.”) He declined choosing instead to stay here in his beloved mountains and share the gospel. He married Nellie McDonald and they moved into the old family home with my Mamma Bryson on Blanton Branch. There they raised their family – three daughters and a son. That house was his home from the time he was born until he passed away a few years back. A simple man, he enjoyed sitting on the porch reading his Bible or playing his guitar and singing. When I moved to Blanton Branch I would often sit on my porch in the evening and listen as he played his guitar and sang the old hymns. The music would float up the hollow toward my house - haunting and beautiful. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 123 Outline Descendant Report for Frederick (Baumgartner) Bumgarner This descendant report was brought to the Society by Harry Bumgarner. It was given to him by Kenneth Bumgarner, who prepared the report. More will follow in future issues. Report has been edited to reflect birth dates of persons born after 1945 being removed. . + Ariel Wepreck m: 23 Jul 2001 in Kalispel, Flathead Co., MT . 13 Indica Rogers . 13 Kyro Rogers . 13 Loic Rogers b: 08 Aug 2004 in Kalispel, Flathead Co., MT, d: 25 Jan 2008 in Kalispel, Flathead Co., MT . 12 Sara Cristine Rogers . + Samuel "Sam" B. Kavanugh m: 14 Jul 2001 in Kalispel, Flathead Co., MT . 13 Amelia Marie Kavanugh . 13 Baby Kavanugh . 10 Alian "Oleon" Ledford b: 19 Apr 1919 in Clay Co., NC, d: 24 Aug 1994 . + Freddie Lee Owenby . 11 Archie Ledford . 11 Larry Ledford . 10 Allegra "Suzie" Ledford b: 26 Jul 1929 in Clay Co., NC, d: 19 Nov 1978 . + Charles Phillips . 11 Charlie Sue Phillips b: 18 Sep 1949, d: Deceased . 11 Charles "Skipper" Phillips II . 11 James Phillips . 11 Michael Phillips . + Homer Birch . 9 Naomi E. Bumgarner b: 1892 . 9 Aaron Bumgarner b: 1895 in Speedwell, Jackson Co., NC, d: 20 Aug 1934 in Briar Creek Rd., near Madison, Morgan Co., GA . + Edna Knight . 10 Elbert D. Bumgarner . 9 Clayton (Clalon) Bumgarner b: 22 Sep 1898 in Speedwell, Jackson Co., NC, d: 01 Apr 1975 in Madison, Morgan Co., GA . + Ola (Ollie) Alma Rice b: 23 Aug 1908 in Robbinsville, Graham Co., NC, m: 16 Apr 1929 in Greene Co., GA, d: 31 Dec 1977 in Atlanta, Fulton Co., GA . 10 Virgil (Verjie) Jackson Bumgarner b: 18 Nov 1930 in Greensboro Highway, Sugar Creek Community, near Madison, Morgan Co., GA . + Dorthy Mae Shepherd b: 08 Jan 1935, m: 02 Apr 1953 in Penfield, Greene Co., GA, d: 07 May 2008 in Athens, Clarke Co., GA . 11 Constance Jean "Connie" Bumgarner . + James "Jimmy" Cunningham m: 20 Mar 1976 in Sugar Creek Baptist Church, near Madison on Greensboro Hwy, Morgan Co., GA . 12 Emmily Elizabeth Cunningham b: in Athens, Clarke Co., GA . + James Woodrow "Jim" Lacey b:in North Carolina, m: 18 May 1996 in the Cunningham backyard in Madison, Morgan Co., GA . 13 James Woodrow "Jim" Lacey Jr. b: in Athens, Clarke Co.,GA . 13 John Daniel Lacey b: in Athens, Clarke Co., GA . 13 Jay Cunningham Lacey b: in Athens, Clarke Co., GA . 10 John Thomas Bumgarner b: 04 Apr 1934 in Madison, Morgan Co., GA . + Barbara Jean Johnson b: 04 Apr 1938 in Atlanta, Fulton Co., GA, m: 10 Apr 1955 in Monroe, Walton Co., GA, d: 25 Sep 2002 in Madison, Morgan Co., GA Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 124 . 11 John Thomas "Tommy" Bumgarner Jr. b: in Atlanta, Fort McPherson, Fulton Co., GA . + Rhonda Louise Malcom b:in Madison Morgan Co., GA, m: 12 Oct 1991 in Walhalla, Oconee Co., SC . 12 Shane Thomas Bumgarner b: in Greensboro, Green Co., GA . 11 Clayton Eugene "Clay" Bumgarner b: in Fort Bragg, Cumberland Co., NC . + Janet Ghann . + Jacqueline Diane Marshall m: 26 Sep 2003 . 10 James William Bumgarner b: 10 Dec 1935 in Briar Creek Rd., near Madison, Morgan Co., GA, d: 12 Jul 2007 in Briar Creek Rd., near Madison, Morgan Co., GA . + Emily "Kathleen" Shepherd b: 21 Nov 1940 in Madison, Morgan Co., GA, m: 15 Jun 1958 in Sugar Creek Baptist Church, near Madison on Greensboro Hwy, Morgan Co., GA . 11 James William "Jimmy" Bumgarner Jr. b:in Athens, Clarke Co., GA . + Lisa Jo Garrison b:in Madison, Morgan Co., GA, m: 05 Apr 1997 in Gatlinburg, TN . + Connie Campbell . 10 Ruby "Jo" Bumgarner b: 20 May 1943 in Briar Creek Rd., near Madison, Morgan Co., GA . + Bill Carroll Marcrum b: 19 Dec 1943 in Atlanta, Fulton Co., GA, m: 12 Jun 1964 in Sugar Creek Baptist Church, near Madison on Greensboro Hwy, Morgan Co., GA, d: 07 Mar 2003 in Buckhead, Morgan Co., GA . 11 Sherri Leagh Marcrum b: in Atlanta, Fulton Co., GA . + Patrick "Marshall" Brown b: in Jeffersonville, Twiggs Co., GA, m: 02 May 1992 in Zion Baptist, near Covington, Newton Co., GA . 12 Patrick Marshall Brown Jr. b: in Dublin, Laurens Co., GA . 12 Garrett Marcrum Brown b: in Dublin, Laurens Co., GA . 12 Abigail "Abby" Leagh Brown b: in Dublin, Laurens Co., GA . 10 Robert Manuel "Bob" Bumgarner b: in Briar Creek Rd., near Madison, Morgan Co., GA . + Janice Dean Couch b:in Madison, Morgan Co.,GA, m: 13 Jul 1968 in Brownwood Baptist Church, near Madison, Morgan Co., GA . 11 Wesley Mitchell "Wes" Bumgarner b: in Athens, Clarke Co., GA . + Angela Kaye "Ange" McGee m: in Vinning, Fulton Co., GA . 12 Hannah Renaé Bumgarner b: inKennesaw, Cobb Co., GA . 12 Mackenzee Kaye Bumgarner b:in Kennesaw, Cobb Co., GA . 12 Colton Wesley Bumgarner b:in Keller, Torrance Co., TX, d: 24 Feb 2004 in Keller, Torrance Co., TX . 12 Gracee Lynne Bumgarner b:in Keller, Torrance Co., TX . 11 Julie Renaé Bumgarner b:in Athens, Clarke Co., GA . + Todd Patrick Copeland b:in Greensboro, Green Co., GA, m: 16 Sep 1996 in Gatlinburg, TN . 12 Lily Elizabeth "Lily-Beth" Copeland b:in Athens, Clarke Co., GA . 9 Mae Bumgarner b: Dec 1904 in Lick Log, Clay Co., NC, d: Aft. 1988 in Bedford, VA . + Luther Rice b: 1906 in Robinsville, Graham Co., NC . 10 Elizabeth Ann Rice b: 22 Sep 1942 in Sugar Creek Community, near Madison, Morgan Co., GA . + Unknown Moore . 8 John Beuregard Bumgarner b: 22 Dec 1861, d: 29 Jul 1934 in Cullowhee, Jackson Co., NC . + Amanda Jane (Holder) Holden b: 08 May 1865 in Swain Co., NC, m: 25 Oct 1891 in Cullowhee, Jackson Co., NC, d: 17 Oct 1934 in Cullowhee, Jackson Co., NC . 9 Frank Ray Bumgarner b: 07 May 1893, d: 14 Jan 1919 in Jackson Co., NC . + Mae Pressley b: 24 Jul 1894, d: 29 Aug 1948 in Jackson Co., NC . 10 Frankie Bumgarner Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 125 . 9 Robert "Vernon" Bumgarner b: 18 Dec 1899 in North Carolina, d: 23 Apr 1977 in Jackson Co., NC . + Flora (Flara) Conner b: 24 Dec 1904, d: 09 Apr 1930 . 10 Elof Bumgarner . 10 Jessie Bumgarner . + Nellie B. Unknown b: 14 Jun 1899, d: 11 Aug 1984 in Jackson Co., NC . 10 Carl V. Bumgarner b: 16 Mar 1938, d: 04 Sep 1947 in Jackson Co., NC . 8 George B. Bumgarner b: 06 Oct 1864, d: 14 Jun 1933 in Jackson Co., NC . + Mary "Darthula" (Darthida) Moss b: 18 Aug 1869, m: 23 Dec 1886 in at W. M. Moss, Jackson Co., NC, d: 04 Apr 1952 in Hamburg, Jackson Co., NC . 9 Radford H. Bumgarner b: 1888 in North Carolina . + Zula Luwk b: 1895 . 10 Helen M. Bumgarner b: 1920 . 10 Dorothy Bumgarner . 10 Hayes Bumgarner . 10 Memie Bumgarner . 9 Pascal "Ray" Bumgarner b: 1889 in North Carolina . + Lola Taylor . 10 Georgie Bumgarner . 10 Edna Bumgarner . 10 Frank Bumgarner . 10 Fred Bumgarner . 9 Royal (Roy) "Bee" Bumgarner b: 22 Nov 1890 in North Carolina, d: 12 Apr 1944 . + Frankie Zachary b: 09 Dec 1901, d: 01 Feb 1927 . 10 Prue Bumgarner . 9 Herbert L. Bumgarner b: 25 Mar 1893 in North Carolina, d: 07 Jan 1950 . + Ola Dillard b: 01 Oct 1899, d: 04 Dec 1939 . 10 Dora Lee Bumgarner b: 1917 . 10 Elizabeth Bumgarner b: 1919 . 10 Conrad Bumgarner b: 1921 . 10 Willie Mae Bumgarner b: 1924 . 10 Beatrice Bumgarner b: 1926 . 10 Violet (Vialta) Bumgarner b: 1928 . 10 Wallace Bumgarner b: 1929 . 10 Fred Bumgarner . 9 Fred C. "Freddie" Bumgarner b: 1896 in North Carolina . + Elizabeth Todd . 10 Dorothy Bumgarner . 9 Winnie Bumgarner b: 1899 in North Carolina . + Lyman Stewart . 10 George J. Stewart . 10 Conrad Stewart . 10 Eugene Stewart . 10 James Stewart . 9 William "Newton" Bumgarner b: 26 Dec 1900 in North Carolina, d: 27 Jan 1910 in Jackson Co., NC . 9 Mabel Bumgarner b: 1903 in North Carolina . + J. B. Galloway . 10 Catheryn Galloway . 10 Lysle Galloway . 10 Mary Bess Galloway . 10 Arlie Galloway . 9 George "Clarence" Bumgarner b: 1906 in North Carolina . + Lavinia Mann b: Six Mile, Pickens Co., SC . 10 Evelyn Bumgarner b: 1929 Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 126 . + Unknown Childers . 10 Willie Bumgarner . 9 Verdie "Irene" Bumgarner b: 14 Apr 1909 in Jackson Co., NC, d: 16 Jul 1910 in Jackson Co., NC . 9 John "Ralph" (Baumgarner) Bumgarner b: 05 Jul 1912 in Jackson Co., NC, d: 09 Sep 1988 in Kingston, Roan Co., TN . + Bessie Davis "Nana" Norton b: 19 Mar 1917 in Jackson Co., NC, d: 18 Dec 1994 in Kingston, Roan Co., TN . 10 Bessie Jean (Baumgarner) Bumgarner b: 30 Sep 1936 in Jackson Co., NC . + Charles Dye . 10 Deborah Ruth (Baumgarner) Bumgarner b: 28 Oct 1938 in Jackson Co., NC, d: 10 Jun 2005 in Kingston, Roan Co., TN . + B.J. White . 10 Byrce Emmett "Bob" (Baumgarner) Bumgarner b: 27 Feb 1941 in Jackson Co., NC, d: 06 Apr 1975 in Anderson Co.,TN . 10 Carol Ann Bumgarner b: 25 May 1948 in Sylva, Jackson Co., NC . + Lloyd Gene Hileman b: 16 Feb 1944, m: 19 Aug 1967 in Oliver Springs, Anderson Co., TN . 11 Gina Lynn Hileman b: in Oak Ridge, Anderson Co., TN . 11 Michael Lloyd Hileman b: in Oak Ridge, Anderson Co., TN . + Ashley Thomas Sharp . 12 Jacob Sharp Hileman b: in Fort Lauderdale, Broward Co., FL . 11 Douglas Lee Hileman b: in Oak Ridge, Anderson Co., TN . 10 Phyllis Elizabeth "Jill" Bumgarner b: in Brevard, Transylvania Co., NC . 8 Charles C. "Charlie" Bumgarner b: 22 May 1867, d: 24 Apr 1940 in Asheville, Buncombe Co., NC . + Susan Holden b: 29 Jul 1870, m: 22 Sep 1899 in Cullowhee, Jackson Co., NC, d: 18 May 1934 . 9 Miles Bumgarner . + Janie Unknown . 10 Helen Fay Bumgarner . 10 Maynard Bumgarner . 9 Lake Bumgarner . 9 Minnie Bumgarner . 9 Holmes Bumgarner . 9 Otelia Bumgarner . + Loyal Westmoreland . 10 Sarah Sue Westmoreland . 10 Catholine Westmoreland . 9 John L. Bumgarner . + Modina Unknown . 10 Woodrow Bumgarner . 9 Felix E. Bumgarner . 9 Effie Bumgarner . + C. A. Epperson . 10 Charles Allen Epperson . 8 Martha Darthula "Sula" (Sulie) Bumgarner b: 05 Dec 1869, d: 12 Oct 1956 . + Miles Holden b: 24 Jul 1869, m: 20 Nov 1887 in at Lucinda Bumgarner, Jackson Co., NC, d: 29 Apr 1937 in Speedwell, Jackson Co., NC . 9 Della Holden . + Edward Wilson . 10 Felma Wilson Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 127 Searching, Internet, and DNA This is an article about a journey that JCGS member, Nelma Bryson has finally completed. We are pleased that she finally got answers to her questions and then was generous with us by sharing this story. I became interested in genealogy about two decades ago because I believed it would help me solve a lifetime mystery, the identity of my dad. I cannot remember a time in my life I was not obsessed with finding him. My mom would tell me nothing helpful. She said it was none of my business. All I knew was she was in the Women's Army Air Corps when she became impregnated in October of 1946. I had counted back nine months from my birthday to figure that out. As a child I would question any men in the vicinity of my voice if they were possibly my father much to the embarrassment and anger of my mother. She caught me at the bus stop in Houston, TX several times asking men as they descended from the bus. I was in first grade at the time. For me it was always need to know. As I grew up in Texas and North Carolina I found other avenues of research. I questioned at length all the family, friends, and acquaintances associated with my mom. None of them had a clue who fathered me. Many of them were interested, but never in my mom's presence. Her anger about the subject was formidable. The introduction of the internet into my life gave me many more resources for searching. I used my limited information to explore the world for clues. Nothing came of the searching and I turned to genealogy to fill in the maternal family tree with borrowed Family Tree Maker software. This occupied a great deal of my time without getting me any closer to finding Dad. It did, however, fill my mind and floppy disks with surnames that were all rooted in the maternal side of my family. The paternal side remained blank. Around the time that DNA testing was offered online, my mom died. I was having brain and spinal surgeries over the course of six years and recovery was boring. I was by this time retired from my career and began writing books. In my soul I had always been a writer and now I had plenty of time to pursue the passion. I also had plenty of time to work on researching my paternity. After mom died, I gained access to her DD214 which showed she had left the WACs in February, 1947. More importantly, it showed that she had been stationed at Hamilton Air Field, California. I learned everything I could about the air base. I scoured the old photos she had of her days in uniform. It didn't give me much information at that time. I DNA tested with three companies; Ancestry, 23&me, and Family Tree. At that time their data bases were much smaller than they are now. It took a couple of years to receive any significant matches. I found connections with second and third cousin matches that led me to a common ancestor in a family that had no connections with my maternal side. I found my paternal great grandparents. I researched their family on Ancestry and found a brick wall in the year 1915. It was as if the entire family had disappeared from the face of the earth. I had worked diligently for over a year collecting data on every family member and then there was nothing. What happened in 1915 to eliminate the family of mother, father, two daughters, and four sons? World War I happened. I asked for help from DNA Detectives on Facebook. About six months later, one of them found documented evidence of the family. They had changed their surname from the original German name to a simpler, Americanized version. With this new name I was able to follow their lives through marriages, births, and obituaries to identify the next generation. I found only one grandson who fit the age limits to be my dad. The problem was his service in the Army. He had been discharged two years before my mom had enlisted. In spite of the evidence, I persisted. He was the only candidate. I double checked all my data and knew in my mind this had to be my paternal family. My DNA matches all pointed to them. No matter how hard I tried, there was no way to put this man in the same vicinity as my mom when I was conceived. I gave up. Despair and depression carried me to hopelessness. I had run out of options. There was nowhere else to look. I halfheartedly joked about Immaculate Conception. I got on with my life. Several months later a long-time genealogist and old classmate of mine told me about a young lady she had heard speak about DNA genealogy. She lives in our area. She gave me her phone number. I postponed calling her because I was intimidated by so many disappointments. I did not want another failed attempt. It took me months to come to grips with my fears. Eventually, I called her. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 128 I have no idea how she did it, but she found documentation that proved how one of the sons had changed his name after marriage and the birth of his daughter. He had been in trouble as a young teenager and evidently had a criminal record. Because he wanted to work for the railroad, he applied for a delayed birth certificate and social security card in a different name before the birth of his son. His surname, wife, and daughter's names were all the same as before. Frank became Robert and appeared as Robert on his son's birth certificate. I finally had the name of my dad three days after my 70th birthday. My joy knew no bounds. I shared my news with my children. I had, at long last, found the name of their maternal grandfather. My eldest son called me in tears to tell me he had found a 14 year old inquiry on an Ancestry message board of a woman who was looking for her dad. His name was the same as my dad's. He had found my sister! I took the information and shared it with my new-found helper. I was too emotional and too shaky to use the resources at hand to follow up on this new lead. In one day, my sister was found on Facebook and I messaged her and she called me. We talked forever. Soon after, I traveled to visit her. She only lives about five hours away! My dad died in 2014. My sister had found him about 15 years before and had renewed their relationship. His grave is near her. We visited it together. She shared stories, pictures, and all the information she had. It has been the happy ending I had longed for all my life. The result is bittersweet because I had hoped my dad would somehow still be living and I only missed meeting him by three years. I have, however, a sister I never knew I had and nieces and a nephew and confirmation of my new reality. When I returned home from my sister's I had an inquiry from a DNA match asking about a common ancestor who is related through my dad's mother's branch of the family. My sister is currently waiting on results of her DNA test, but we already know we are family. DNA doesn't lie. If it had not been for the internet, DNA testing, and social media, I could have never made this miraculous journey. I could have never found my dad or my sister. The twists and turns of the search were only conquered by modern technology. There was no other way to put it all together. And now the search continues. Dad told my sister about the birth of his son when he was stationed in Korea. We are searching for our brother. Our Ancestors If you could see your ancestors If you could see your ancestors All standing in a row, All standing in a row, Would you be proud of them or not There might be some of them perhaps Or don’t you really know? You wouldn’t care to know. Some strange discoveries are made But there’s another question, In climbing family trees Which requires a different view. And some of them you know, I you could meet your ancestors Do not particularly please. Would they be proud of you? Author Unknown Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 129 JCGS President’s Report Nearing the end of 2017, we can look back on what has been a successful year for the Jackson County Genealogical Society. Beginning in January with a well attended program on local newspapers by JCGS Vice President George Frizzell and continuing through Liz Skene’s informative Nov. 9 report on Hunter Library’s online resources pertaining to genealogy, we have enjoyed excellent programs all year. I’d like to thank past-President Tim Osment for scheduling and coordinating those events for us. Tim generously contributed his time to organize our programs for the past four years; starting in January he will take a well-deserved rest from that duty. Thanks also go out to Mike and Norma Clayton for all their hard work to make the Oct. 1 Cruise-In a huge success. Totaling up the Oct. 1 receipts combined with pre-event donations, the Cruise-In netted the Society just over $5,000 after expenses were paid. T-shirts commemorating the event and the Sylva’s old Rebel Restaurant are still available for a minimum $20 donation in the JCGS office during regular hours – Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. We also appreciate Carol Bryson and Nelma Bryson for their efforts to host a JCGS booth at Mountain Heritage Day. After expenses they raised almost $500 and shared information about the Society. Another fundraiser is ongoing: The JCGS is having a pre-Christmas sale on the book that led to the Society’s beginnings, “Jackson County Heritage Vol. I.” A limited number of copies of this beautiful book are available at the discounted price of $50, just in time for holiday giving. And, speaking of holidays, our annual covered-dish dinner is happening on a new day and in a new location. This year’s event will be Tuesday, Dec. 5, at 6 p.m. in the Community Room at the Jackson County Library. We thought it was time to change things up, so we will be utilizing the same beautiful space where we have our programs to dine together and catch up on the year’s events. Our annual awards will be announced and officers will be installed. Please mark the new day on your calendars and plan to join us in December. Another benefit to having our dinner in the Jackson County Library is that we can easily open our JCGS office to accept payment of 2018 dues and sell publications, including the on-sale Heritage Book Vol. I. When you’re thinking of holiday gifts, remember we also have DVDs of the movie made during the 1951 Jackson County Centennial and of the information contained in The Sylvan, which was Mead Corporation’s monthly magazine. Another exciting development is that the first 17 years of our newsletter, Journeys Through Jackson, are now online as part of the digital collections offered by WCU’s Hunter Library. Special Collections Director Liz Skene oversaw this effort, and we are grateful to her and her staff. Having this information online means that the material so painstakingly gathered and compiled by former Editor Larry Crawford and current Editor Sanji Watson is now searchable by anyone researching local genealogy or history. Plans are to get the next seven or so years of Journeys (through 2016) online soon and then to add future issues at the end of each calendar year. Looking ahead to next year, our January program will be presented by Western Carolina University history professor Rob Ferguson, who will share information he’s learned through his research into the people from Jackson and other Western North Carolina counties who moved to the state of Washington, taking their Tar Heel culture along with them. We hope to see you on Thursday, Jan. 11, for Rob’s talk. Also on the horizon, though plans are incomplete at this time, is a program that will move away from the Library and into the community. We are tentatively planning to hold our Thursday, June 14, meeting/program at the Tuckasegee VFW building and incorporating a fundraiser dinner and cakewalk into that night’s activities. Watch for more news in the coming months. Remember that our programs are always on the second Thursday of the month at 6:30 p.m., with the exception of December, when the potluck dinner replaces the regular meeting/program. In closing, I’d like to say that all of us on the JCGS board appreciate your interest in genealogy and your commitment to the Society. We had a wonderful 2017 and all of us on the board are planning for an even better 2018. --- Lynn Hotaling, -- JCGS President Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 130 Office Manager Report The 2017 year has flown by rapidly for me, being my first year as office manager. With suggestions of desired changes coming to me frequently, I had to ascertain the value of the proposals against current standard office procedures, then decide what would be the most efficient changes, if any. The replacement of our genealogy notebook shelving with two more sturdy, attractive and taller wooden shelves, was a major improvement to our office, and was installed just in time to get filled up with notebooks from our newly received Trudy Adams Collection. This Collection added 39 notebooks of family tree studies of a multitude of local families, some of which are Blanton, Brown, Coward, Gunter, Nicholson, Norton, Pickerel, and Rogers. The Collection also included 7 books and 19 other archival documents. Noting a lack of an inventory list of all of our acquisition items and collections previously acquired, I have started one. So far, I have listed, located and enumerated 162 different archival items and 13 maps, and a long ways from being done. To review this ongoing list and see what else we have in our research room to aid you in your genealogy study challenge, drop in and speak to our knowledgable volunteer staff of 13 people on different shifts, from Monday to Friday and Saturdays by appointment. – Carol Bryson -- Office Manager The ladies are hard at work selling t-shirts, posters and memberships at the Cruise-In. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 131 Mountain Heritage Day & The Rebel Cruise-In The first weekend in October was a very busy weekend for volunteers of the JCGS. On Saturday, Carol Bryson and Nelma Bryson, (dressed in period clothing), spearheaded the booth at Mountain Heritage Day, which is held on the campus of Western Carolina University every year. JCGS and Mountain Heritage Day have a long history together, with the Society winning the Mountain Heritage Award and several members being nominated and winning awards also. Several members past and present were instrumental in the operation of Mountain Heritage Day for years. The ladies and other volunteers spent the day telling people about the Society; selling our publications and obtaining new memberships. Thank you to all who participated in this endeavor. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 132 On Sunday, October 1, the annual Rebel Cruise-In was held in the Sav-Mor parking lot, which was the location for the Rebel Restaurant. There was a car show, an escorted cruise around Sylva and Dillsboro, hot food, great t-shirts and memorabilia for sale, and memberships were offered also. Thank you to Mike & Norma Clayton for spearheading this event. Also, a heartfelt thank you to the volunteers that came and gave their time and effort to make this event a success. Thank you to the sponsors and every one that came out to Cruise the Rebel one more time. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 133 2017 Members If you find someone you would like to correspond with about a particular family, please contact the JCGS office and we will get you in contact with that person. Abernathy, Jimmie B. TN Albert, Julie Nicholson TX Alexander, Doug SC Coggins, Bryson, Wilkes, Leopard Allison, Ricky NC Allison Andrews, Betty Cope FL Andrews, Nancy Lovingood NC Anthis,Nancy TX Gribble, Buchanan, McKee Armstrong, Richard F. UT Bryson, Tatham, Countryman, Murray Austin, Ann McKee NC McKee, Cashiers and Glenville families Bales, Patricia MO Bryson, Angel Barker, Bonnie Lemme WA Mills, Hooper, Arrington Barker, Hazel W. NC Beck, Dorris Dills & Sam NC Beck, Fred B. SC Behre, Rosalind Rowlson NC Bishop, William Woodrow WA Higdon, Bishop, Styles, Rogers Black, Mildred NC Blackwell, Robert & Marilyn NC Blake, Wanda Farmer NC Farmer, Harris, Miller, Reynolds, Nations, Jones Blazer, Debbie NC Bolick, Sue Clement NC Bowles, Jim & Maggie NC Bream, Dottie SD Brock, Harry & Elizabeth NC Queen, Fisher, Bryson, Henson, Crawford, Hemphill, Taylor, Duncan, Cook, Knight, Lackey, Cuthbertson Broom, Mildred NC Broom, Queen Brown, Jean Crawford GA Bryant, Lynn Allen NC Bryson, Billie M. NC Bryson, David & Carol NC Bryson, Cashiers and Glenville families Bryson, Nell Ensley NC Cope, Ensley. Allison, Fisher Bryson, Nelma NC Bryson, Crawford, Ensley, Hemphill, Morrow, Masey, Queen, Christy, Kenney, Smathers, Snider, Knight, Beck, Hoyle Bryson, Robby NC Bryson, Stewman, Barnes Bryson, Ruth L. NC Buchanan, Brian F. NC Buchanan, Hattie L. WA Bumgarner, Harry & Dollie NC Bunn, Sandra W. NC Burns, Martha L. SC Green, Gunter, Jones Buxton, Alma OH Robinson Callicott, Lavine G. MD Cantrell, B. B, & Alatha NC Cantrell, Geoff NC Carden, Gary N. NC Carlisle, Jerry F. SC Carlson, Elaine WA Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 134 Cassada, Clarice TN Caylor, Henrietta G. NC Clark, Margaret NC Clark, Marie NC Clayton, Mike & Norma NC Clayton, Bryson, Potts, Reed, Hooper, Harris, Henson, Deitz Cobb, Mary Jo NC Cody, Doug NC Cody, Bryson Collins, Linda Hughes NC Conner, Jeff NC Conner, Harris, Reece Cook, John D. DE Cooper, Bernie OK Bryson, Ensley, Sherrill, Parris, Cunningham, Conley Cooper, Joyce NC Cormier, Donna Smith NC Cowan, Edward WA Coyle, Philip E. (Ted) NC Crawford, Frank M. NC Crawford, James & Betty GA Crawford, Robert (Larry) NC Crawford, William L. (Bill) NC Crawford, Jan & Lisa NC Crowder, Joyce Bryson NC Cunningham, Jim FL Cypher, Sue NC Davis, Linda SC Davis, Loreda TN Wood, Raines, Lanning Davis, Perry G. NC Deitz, Joseph NC Richard Wilson, Savannah Community Dillard, Terry NC Duncan, James & Linda M. NC Duncan, Parris, Miller, Edmonston Edwards, Dorothy GA Elliott, Darlene Crawford NM Crawford, Briscoe Ensley, Dillard & Willette GA Ensley, Harold TN Ensley, Haven NC Ensley, Mack Hayes WA Ensley, Carnes, Queen Ensley, Nancy Ontario, Canada Ensley, Browning, Love Ensley, Ronald W. FL Estes, Dennis J. OR Farmer, Aquilla Henry NC Carver, Passmore, Henry Finger-Smith, Anita NC Ashe, Leopard Fisher, Danny NC Fisher, James R. NC Fisher, Nancy Sutton SC Floyd, Rufus Gordon TX Fort, Doris NC Monteith, Ashe Fouts, Sue K. NC Frady, Sallie NC Frady, William G. NC Fraser, Anna Chandler Smith TN Candler, Thomas Frizzell, David C. NC Frizzell, George NC Frizzell, Rick NC Garland, Brenda Gail NC Gibson, Wykle, Queen Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 135 Garza, Amy Ammons SC Gibson, Cathy Stillwell NC Stillwell, Bumgarner, Galloway Gooch, Garth D. UT Goodwin, Anne VA Green, Buford Bennett WA Green, Cozette NC Greene, Todd & Deborah Ashe TX Ashe, Greene, Green, Painter, Crawford, Frizzell, Stewart, West, Singleton, Blalock, Campbell, Cathey, Wood, Owens Gregory, Jason NC Gross, Thomas J. MD Guffey, Audrey, Ensley NC Hammerly, Martha NC Haskett, Wade L. NC Heindl, Katy SC Helms, Stephen Reese NC Conner, Spake Turner, Swearinger, Helms, Craft Helms, William & Barbara NC Henry, Dorothy Luker NC Luker, Shook, Brown, Wood Hensley, Bill R. NC Hensley, Fern & Harold NC Herren, Wanda NC Stephens, Phillips Heymann, Jane Nichols NC Nichols, Shuler, Leatherwood, Jenkins Hooper, Alvin D. NC Hooper, Danny NC Hooper, Irene NC Hooper, Stanley & Darlene NC Hotaling, Lynn NC Hotaling, Richard NC Hoyle, Max E. GA Hunt, Teresa B. VA Huter, Jill L. NC Johnson, Carolyn Deitz NC Johnson, Frankie NC Jones, Claude & Anne NC Jones, Cathey, Picklesimer Jones, Danny F. NC Jones, Grover WA Jones, Jr, George Paul SC Jones, Burch Keener, Debra D. NC Kennedy, James Emory TX Kimble, Betty NC King, Richard NC Bryson, Cathey, Crawford, Henry, Hooper, Parker, Mathis, Wood, Brown, Jones Krepps, Pearl NC Glenville families Kryssbek, Thomas UT Lambert, Peggy NC Larson, Peggy K. CA Lee, Gladys Watson NC Lindsay, Paul CA Long, Sheila Rogers NC Lowder, Mary Katherine NC Luker, Joann NC Maney, Kenny NC Manring, Jim NC Manring, Teresa Deitz NC Deitz, Thorpe, Barker, Buchanan, The Rebel Restaurant, Cemeteries, Old Field Church Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 136 Marcus, Wanda Bryson NC Mason, Fern MD Mason, Peggy Queen NC Mathews, Barbara Jean NC Mathis, Donald E. & Susan A. SC Mathis, Cochran, Hoffman, Upton, Brown Maurice, Betty Thomas BC Canada Thomas, Henson, Reice, Pressley, Inman Maxwell-Fisher, Linda C. NC McCall, Norman GA McClure, Roy NC McClure, Thomas E. NC McClure, Buchanan, Coward, Sitton, Candler, Love, Denton, Chastain, Wilson, Burrell, Dills McClure, William Eugene NC McCrary, Jayne NC McGinnis, James VA McMahan, Brian NC Melton, Ann Davis NC Michaelree, Joan P. NY Potts Middleton, III, Woodford R. NC Miles, Celia Hooper NC Millsap, William J. WA Brown, Akin, Akins, Aiken Monteith, Delos NC Monteith, James D. NC Monteith, James E. NC Monteith, Joel OH Moody, Blonnie Y. NC Moody, Maurice & Mary Ellen NC Moody, Beck, Geisler, Hoyle, Smokemont Area Morgan, Betty J. WA Parker, Pearson, Brown, Queen Morton, Larry & Marilyn NC Murray, Sandra C. & Thomas P. AL Cowan, Hall, Hooper, Buchanan Nardy, Jane Gibson NC Zachary, Cashiers & Glenville families Nations, Frankie WA Nations, Mrs. Ellis WA Nations, Sue NC Nations, Dills, Phillips, Williamson Nicholson, Ken & Karen NC Nicholson, Kristi TX Osment, Timothy NC Ozbirn, Mary C. AL Pannell, Richard NC Parker, James Michael GA Parker, Hooper Parris, James & Ruby IA Payne, Margaret NC Peters, E. Ann Hampton OH Peterson, Elizabeth Shook NC Shook, Chambers Phillips, Bob NC Phillips, Thorpe, Barker, Buchanan Phillips, Jr., Sam B. SC Phillips, Sue NC Picklesimer, James NC Proctor, Christine Cole NC Cole, Woody, Hoyle, Shook Queen, Jerry NC Queen Queen, Joe Sam NC Queen, Lois B. FL Ratcliffe, Sheila Pannell VA Rhinehart, Joe P. NC Riddle, Merrell J. NC Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 137 Robinson, W. Dave & Wanda MD Robinson, Crawford, Henson, Fisher, Gilleland, Hemphill, Briscoe Rodgers, Lucy SC Rowell, Jim & Rena NC Murray, Shinn, Marlow, Rowell Rowland, Betty R. NC Raby, Conley, Sherrill, Hooper, Stephens Rudd, George & Anita SC Ryan, Jr., James C. NC Moore, Candler, Thomas, Mahoney Scott, Jim & Jean Hooper NC Seago, Naomi NC Sellers, Brenda NC Sellers, Dick NC Sellers, Terry & Linda MS Shelton, Annette NC Shoal Creek Baptist Church NC Shular, Charles NC Shuler, Ruth Crawford NC Shults, Violet TN Siske, Michael NC Smathers, Dale H. CA Smith, Barbara Shelton NC Smith, Marie D. & Peggy Wike NC Smith, Mary Buchanan NC Smith, Pearl OR Snyder, Louise NC Stanford, Barbara Long NC Stewart, Carl NC Stewart, Marcia NC Stewart, Marilyn Deitz CA Stinnett, Ocie NC Stiwinter, Elaine McCall NC Stuckey, Janet G. SC Sutton, Clifford Mack NC Sutton, James M. TX Sutton, Bailey, Strain Sutton, Jo Anne H. NC Sutton, Tom & Sandra OR Sutton, Mills, Arrington, Brooks, Elliot, Broughton Swingle, Mr. & Mrs. Winfred W. GA Conley, Smith Trantham, Ida Thompson WA Treadway, Marie NC Vance, Helen Cable NC Wachob, Bruce & Christy VA Walker, Coleman H. GA Watson, Ira Mitchell NC Watson, Sanji Talley NC Shook, Middleton, Hooper, Brown, Golden, Talley, Burrell, Carver Webb, Jones GA Webster, Lynda K. TN West, Dona NC Whitley, Denise NC Slatton, Slatten, Brown, Barnes Wilson, Claude A. CA Henry, Wilson Wilson, Everett & Elizabeth NC Wilson, Nancy Sherrill NC Wilson, R. O. NC Wilson, Virginia Hoyle NC Wirtz, Janet Moffitt WA Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 138 Wolffer, Jo NC Ward Wood, Baxter NC Wood, Carroll CA Woody, Shelby Jean NC Woosley, Royce & Marcia NC Worley, Donna M. NC Matthews, Mathis, McCall, Vinson, Worley, Downs, Wilson, Henderson, Montgomery, Parker, Williams, Gillett, Chastain Zachmann, Nancy Greene NC In addition to the individual and family members, we also have exchanges and agreements with other Libraries, Genealogical Societies, and Historical Associations. Library Acquisitions Author Title Donated by Woods, Leeunah Vance Growing up on Hazel Creek and in the Fontana Basin Area Lee Woods Rucker, Elizabeth Hoyle The Genealogy of Peter Heyl and his Descendents, 1100-1936 with intermarried families of Arnold, Bess, Byrd (Kestner), Davis, Freeman, Gantt (Gaunt, Ghent), Green, Hahn, Henkel, Hoffman, Hovis, Huffstetle. Vol I & Vol. II Lynn Hotaling White, Barbara A Month of Sundays in God’s Country: a discovery of rural churches in Macon County, North Carolina Amy Ammons Garza White, Barbara Another Month of Sundays in God’s Country: a discovery of rural churches in Macon County, North Carolina Amy Ammons Garza White, Barbar More than and month of Sundays in God’s country: a discovery of rural churches in Macon County, North Carolina Amy Ammons Garza Lowder, Mary Katherine Sherrill & Nancy Sherrill Wilson Home Place of Robert Lee “Bob” Holden and Drusilla Taylor Holden, Speedwell, Jackson County, NC US Dept. of the Interior At Home in the Smokies: A History Handbook for Great Smoky Mountains National Park Amy Ammons Garza Ray, Susie Roberts Dogwood Crafters: A success story, The first twenty-five years. Amy Ammons Garza Myers, Johnnie Sue The Gathering Place: Traditional Wild Game Recipes & Preparation Tips Amy Ammons Garza Mays, Carl People of Passion: Stories of Faith and Determination that will touch your Heart and Warm your Soul, Spotlighting Southern Appalachia Amy Ammons Garza Courtney, Carol The Descendants of Alfred Barker and Martha A. Dailey Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 139 JCGS Monthly Programs Jackson County Genealogical Society, 2017 Programs 2nd Thursdays @ 6:30 p.m., Historic Jackson County Courthouse  January 12: Our History, Heritage, and Headlines w/ George Frizzell  February 9: Mountain Music w/ Jacob, Jesse, and Friends This program generally has the most in attendance of any program and is a February tradition. Left to right: Ethan Fortner; Jacob Jones; Will Howell, and Jesse Stephens.  March 9: Dillsboro’s Appalachian Women’s Museum w/ Cathy Monteith Busick  April 13: Genesis of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians w/ Anita Finger-Smith  May 11: Workshop: DNA Testing for Ancestry and Finding Relatives  June 8: Growing Up on Hazel Creek w/ Helen Vance and Lee Woods Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 140 Lee Woods, standing; seated left to right: Joretta Monteith Moon; Darlene Cable Price; Mildred Cable Johnson; Eleanor Cable Rhinehart; Helen Cable Vance.  July 13: Roots & Traditions of Mountain Music w/ The Deitz Family July is always a great program with the Deitz family carrying tradition forward into the new generation. From left: Joe Deitz; Bill Deitz; Chrystal Deitz; Delores Deitz; Ella Ledford, and Linda Deitz Ledford. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 141  August 10: Lessons Learned on Hazel Creek w/ Dr. Dan Pierce  September 14: Honoring our Heritage on Hallowed Hill w/ Don Casada Dan Pierce  October 1: Fundraiser: The Rebel Cruise-In  November 9: Navigating WCU’s Digital Resources w/ Elizabeth Skene  December 5: Annual Dinner & Meeting Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 142 History. Family Stories. Heritage. It’s all in the Jackson County Genealogical Society’s groundbreaking two-volume Jackson County Heritage. Volume II is out of print, but the Society has a limited number of copies of Volume I on sale at the reduced price of $50 each. Books can be mailed; shipping fees apply. Here’s a sampling of the county history, family history and photos contained in the book: The books make great Christmas gifts for anyone with Jackson County roots. Each copy sold brings us closer to our goal of reprinting Jackson County Heritage Volume II. For information, or to reserve your copy, call 828-631-2646, or email jacksoncountygenealogy@gmail.com Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 143 Index Abernaty 133 Adams 109, 10, 130 Albert 133 Aldridge 121 Alexander 133 Allen 112 Allison 133 Ammons 99, 119, 135, 138 Andrews 133 Angel 133 Anthis 133 Armstrong 133 Arnold 138 Arrington 133, 137 Ash 111, 113 Ashe 118, 119, 120, 121, 134 Austin 133 Bales 133 Barker 133, 135, 138 Barnes 133, 137 Baumgarner 126 Baumgartner 123 Beck 118, 133, 136 Behre 133 Bell 118 Bennett 113 Berry 109 Bess 138 Beutell 103 Birch 121, 123 Bishop 120, 133 Black 133 Blackwell 133 Blake 133 Blalock 135 Blanton 130 Blazer 133 Bly 117 Bolick 133 Bowers 118 Bowles 133 Bracken 115, 117 Bream 133 Brinkley 103, 104, 105, 106, 107 Brinkley 108 Briscoe 134, 137 Brock 108, 133 Brooks 119, 137 Broom 118, 119, 133 Broughton 137 Brown 112, 116, 120, 121, 124, 130, 133, 135, 136, 137 Browning 134 Bryant 133 Bryson 111, 112, 113, 114, 120, 121, 122, 127, 129, 130, 131, 133, 134 Buchanan 111, 119, 121, 133, 135, 136 Bumgarner 120, 121, 123, 124, 125, 126, 133, 135 Bunn 133 Burch 135 Burke 100 Burnett 106, 107 Burns 133 Burrell 102, 136, 137 Busick 139 Buxton 133 Byrd 138 Cabe 119 Cable 137, 140 Cagle 121 Callahan 121 Callicott 133 Campbell 124, 135 Candler 134, 136, 137 Cantrell 133 Carden 133 Carlisle 133 Carlson 133 Carnes 134 Carpenter 121 Carroll 120 Carson 99, 107 Carver 114, 134, 137 Casada 141 Cassada 134 Cathey 135 Caylor 134 Chastain 112, 136, 138 Childers 126 Christy 133 Clark 134 Clayton 109, 116, 122, 129, 132, 134 Cobb 103, 134 Cochran 136 Cody 134 Coggins 113, 133 Cole 136 Collins 134 Conley 134, 137 Conner 134, 135 Cook 133, 134 Cooper 134 Cope 119, 133 Copeland 124 Corbin 112 Cormier 134 Couch 124 Countryman 133 Courtney 138 Cowan 134, 136 Coward 98, 109, 130, 136 Coyle 134 Craft 135 Crane 119 Crawford 98, 107, 129, 133, 134, 135, 137 Crowder 134 Cunningham 123, 134, Cuthbertson 133 Cypher 134 Dailey 138 Davis 112, 134, 138 Deitz 119, 120, 134, 135, 140 Denton 136 Dillard 121, 134 Dills 136 Dobbin 121 Downs 138 Duncan 133, 134 Dye 126 Edmonston 134 Edwards 134 Elliot 137 Elliott 134 English 116 Engren 105 Ensley 98, 121, 133, 134 Epperson 126 Estes 119, 134 Farmer 119, 133, 134 Ferguson 129 Finger-Smith 134, 139 Fisher 133, 134, 137 Floyd 134 Fort 134 Fortner 139 Fouts 134 Fowler 107 Fox 112 Frady 111, 113, 120, 134 Franks 120, 121 Fraser 134 Freeman 121, 138 Frizzell 103, 121, 129, 134, 135, 139 Galloway 115, 117, 125, 135 Gantt 138 Garland 134 Garren 115 Garrison 124 Garza 135, 138 Gaunt 138 Geisler 136 Ghann 124 Ghent 138 Gibson 134, 135 Gilleland 137 Gillett 138 Glazener 115 Golden 120, 137 Gooch 135 Goodwin 135 Grant 121 Green 119, 120, 133, 135, 138 Greene 135 Gregory 114, 135 Gribble 133 Gross 135 Gufey 135 Gunter 130, 133 Hahn 138 Hall 99, 136 Hammerly 135 Hampton 109, 110 Hanes 121 Harris 133, 134 Harron 119 Haskett 135 Heindl 135 Helms 135 Hemphill 133, 137 Henderson 99, 115, 116, 138 Henkel 138 Henry 101, 134, 135, 137 Hensley 135 Henson 133, 134, 136, 137 Herren 98, 135 Heyl 138 Heymann 135 Higdon 120, 133 Hileman 126 Hofman 136, 138 Holbrook 102 Holden 124, 126, 138 Holder 124 Hooper 100, 103, 11, 114, 120, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137 Hotaling 103, 129, 135, 138 Hovis 138 Howell 139 Howse 121 Hoxit 100, 120 Hoyle 133, 135, 136 Hufstetle 138 Hughes 98 Hughey 111 Hunt 135 Huter 135 Hyatt 120 Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2017 144 Inman 136 James 117 Jamison 121 Jenkins 107, 135 Jennings 118, 120, 121 Jnbnke 108 Johnson 120, 121, 123, 135, 140 Jones 119, 133, 135, 139 Kavanugh 123 Keener 135 Keever 119 Kelly 119 Kennedy 135 Kenney 133 Kestner 138 Kimble 135 King 135 Knight 113, 123, 133 Krepps 135 Kryssbek 135 Lacey 123 Lackey 133 Lambert 135 Lanning 115, 121, 134 Leatherwood 135 Ledford 123, 140 Lee 107, 135 Leopard 114, 133, 134 Lindsay 135 Lindsey 98 Long 98, 135 Love 134, 136 Lowder 135 138 Luker 120, 135 Mahoney 137 Malcom 124 Maney 135 Mann 125 Manring 135 Marcrum 124 Marcus 136 Marlow 137 Marshall 124 Masey 133 Mason 136 Mathews 136 Mathis 112, 114, 120, 135, 136, 138 Matthews 138 Maurice 136 Maxwell-Fisher 136 Mays 138 McCall 115, 118, 121, 136, 138 McClure 136 McCrary 136 McDonald 122 McGee 124 McGinnis 136 McHan 119 McKee 133 McMahan 136 Melton 120, 136 Michaelree 136 Middleton 116, 136, 137 Miles 136 Miller 133 Mills 133, 137 Millsap 136 Mingus 103, 104, 106, 107 Mitchell 121 Moffett 122 Monteith 134,136, 139, 140 Montgomery 138 Moody 136 Moon 140 Moore 99, 101, 120, 124, 137 Morgan 136 Morrow 133 Morton 136 Murray 133, 136, 137 Myers 138 Nardy 136 Nations 133, 136 Nichols 135 Nicholson 109, 130, 136 Norton 109, 126, 130 Osment 129, 136 Owen 115, 116, 117 Owenby 123 Owens 135 Ozbirn 136 Painter 121, 135 Pangle 119 Pannell 136 Parker 115, 117, 135, 136, 138 Parkes 117, 118 Parris 134 Parris 134 Parris 136 Passmore 134 Paxton 116 Payne 136 Pearson 136 Peek 99 Peters 136 Peterson 136 Phillips 98, 119, 123, 135, 136 Pickerel 130 Picklesimer 116, 135, 136 Pierce 141 Potts 134 Potts 136 Pressely 119, 111, 113, 120, 124, 13 Price 140 Proctor 136 Queen 133, 134, 136 Raby 137 Raines 134 Ratcliffe 136 Ray 138 Reece 134, 136 Reed 134 Resler 107 Reynolds 111, 133 Rhinehart 119, 136, 140 Rice 119, 121, 123, 124 Riddle 136 Roberts 109 Robinson 133, 137 Rodgers 137 Rogers 109, 120, 123, 130, 133 Rowell 137 Rowland 137 Rucker 138 Rudd 137 Ryan 137 Scott 137 Seago 137 Sellers 121, 137 Setzer 102 Sharp 126 Shattuck 107 Sheckles 102 Shelton 111, 119, 137 Shepard 115 Shepherd 123, 124 Sherrill 134, 137, 138 Shinn 137 Shook 135, 136, 137 Shular 137 Shuler 135, 137 Shults 137 Singleton 135 Siske 137 Sitton 136 Skene 129, 141 Slatten 137 Slatton 100, 137 Smathers 133, 137 Smith 98, 137 Snider 133 Snyder 137 Spake 135 Stanford 137 Stein 107 Stephens 98, 135, 137, 139 Stepp 120 Stewart 100, 101, 120, 125, 135, 137 Stewman 133 Stillwell 135 Stinnett 137 Stiwinter 137 Stokes 121 Stuckey 137 Styles 133 Sutton 119, 137 Swearinger 135 Swingle 137 Talley 119, 137 Tarr 102 Tatham 133 Tayloe 109 Taylor 113, 119, 133, 138 Thomas 134, 136, 137 Thorpe 135 Tillery 99, 114 Tilley 113 Trantham 119, 137 Tranwell 116 Treadway 137 Turner 135 Underwood 121 Upton 136 Vance 137, 138, 139, 140 Vinson 138 Wachob 137 Walker 137 Ward 138 Warren 111, 121 Watson 112, 119, 120, 129, 137 Webb 137 Webster 137 Wepreck 123 West 135, 137 Westmoreland 126 White 126, 138 Whitley 137 Wike 103, 105, 106, 107 Wikle 134 Wilkes 133 Williams 120, 138 Williamson 136 Wilson 112, 126, 134, 136, 137, 138 Wirtz 137 Wolfer 138 Wood 106, 107, 115, 116,119, 134, 135, 138 Woodring 100, 101 Woods 138, 139, 140 Woody 136, 138 Woosley 138 Worley 120, 138 Wortham 121 Young 120 Zachary 109, 136 Zachmann 138 MEMBERSHIP Membership in the Jackson County Genealogical Society is open to all individuals who apply and pay dues. Membership is based on the calendar year and dues are paid in advance. Members joining late in the year will receive back issues of the society's journal for that year. Annual dues are $20 for individuals and $25 for family memberships. Individual lifetime memberships are available based on age: 16-29 $350 60-69 $150 30-39 300 70-79 100 40-49 250 80+ 50 50-59 200 APPLICATION FOR MEMBERSHIP New ____ Renewal ____ Life ____ Amount Paid __________ Name ______________________________________________________________________ Address ____________________________________________________________________ City ___________________________________ State ______ Zip Code _______________ Phone ______________________________________________________________________ E – mail address _____________________________________________________________ Families or Areas of Interest ___________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ Make check payable to JCGS, Inc., and mail to: P. O. Box 480, Sylva, NC 28779 Would you like to receive Journeys Through Jackson: _________ mail ________ e-mail JCGS, Inc. P. O. Box 480 Sylva, NC 28779 www.jcgsnc.org Office and research library at the Jackson County Court House Telephone: 828-631-2646 e-mail address: jacksoncountygenealogy@gmail.com Follow us on Facebook

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Jackson County (N.C.) -- Genealogy -- Periodicals - Registers of births - etc. -- North Carolina -- Jackson County - Cemeteries -- North Carolina -- Jackson County - Bible records -- North Carolina -- Jackson County - Voting registers -- North Carolina -- Jackson County - Death certificates -- North Carolina -- Jackson County

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South African environment / Diana and Rick Sullivan
PRINTED MATL | 1977
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South African transport / Anthony Hocking
PRINTED MATL | 1976
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Patterns of Phylogenetic Diversity of Subtropical Rainforest of the Great Sandy Region, Australia Indicate Long Term Climatic Refugia
Howard, Marion;McDonald, William J F;Forster, Paul I;Kress, W John;Erickson...
Academic Journal Academic Journal | 01/01/2016 Please log in to see more details
Australia’s Great Sandy Region is of international significance containing two World H... more
Patterns of Phylogenetic Diversity of Subtropical Rainforest of the Great Sandy Region, Australia Indicate Long Term Climatic Refugia
01/01/2016
Australia’s Great Sandy Region is of international significance containing two World Heritage areas and patches of rainforest growing on white sand. Previous broad-scale analysis found the Great Sandy biogeographic subregion contained a significantly more phylogenetically even subset of species than expected by chance contrasting with rainforest on white sand in Peru. This study aimed to test the patterns of rainforest diversity and relatedness at a finer scale and to investigate why we may find different patterns of phylogenetic evenness compared with rainforests on white sands in other parts of the world. This study focussed on rainforest sites within the Great Sandy and surrounding areas in South East Queensland (SEQ), Australia. We undertook field collections, expanded our three-marker DNA barcode library of SEQ rainforest plants and updated the phylogeny to 95% of the SEQ rainforest flora. We sampled species composition of rainforest in fixed area plots from 100 sites. We calculated phylogenetic diversity (PD) measures as well as species richness (SR) for each rainforest community. These combined with site variables such as geology, were used to evaluate patterns and relatedness. We found that many rainforest communities in the Great Sandy area were significantly phylogenetically even at the individual site level consistent with a broader subregion analysis. Sites from adjacent areas were either not significant or were significantly phylogenetically clustered. Some results in the neighbouring areas were consistent with historic range expansions. In contrast with expectations, sites located on the oldest substrates had significantly lower phylogenetic diversity (PD). Fraser Island was once connected to mainland Australia, our results are consistent with a region geologically old enough to have continuously supported rainforest in refugia. The interface of tropical and temperate floras in part also explains the significant phylogenetic evenness and higher than expected phylogenetic diversity.

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South African farming / Anthony Hocking
PRINTED MATL | 1975
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The Reporter, April 2016
Western Carolina University
Academic Journal Academic Journal | 01/01/2016 Please log in to see more details
The Reporter is a weekly publication produced by Western Carolina University featuring... more
The Reporter, April 2016
01/01/2016
The Reporter is a weekly publication produced by Western Carolina University featuring news, events, and campus community updates for faculty and staff. ; SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 27, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | EVENTS 2016 Summer Institute for Administrative Support Professionals SAVE THE DATE!! 2016 Summer Institute for Administrative Support Professionals July 19, 1:00pm – 4:30pm July 21, 8:30am – 12:00pm REGISTRATION AND SESSION INFORMATION WILL BE AVAILABLE SOON! CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond the Glass Matrix 5/29/2017 Water Portraits: Barbara Tyroler 6/9/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' 6/10/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 6, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | EVENTS Africa! More Than a Continent events As you plan the rest of your semester, please be aware of the following events that are linked to our campus theme, Africa! More Than a Continent. If you have any question or additional events to add, please contact Laura Wright at lwright@email.wcu.edu. April 4-8, 2016: Serah Mucha and Ronnie Mdawadi Serah Mucha (project manager and public relations) and Ronnie Mdawadi (Kenyan country manager) for Kosmos Solutions International, an NGO working on sustainable development, women’s empowerment, etc. in Kenya will be on campus. Details will be forthcoming. April 13, 2016 (Campus Dining Hall): African Menu During the International Festival there will be an African Menu offered during the lunch hours in the Campus Dining Hall. Recipes include: Chicken Couscous, Eggplant Curry, Okra and Greens, Futari (coconut-peanut pumpkin), and Chinchin (fried pastries) or Banana Enrolada (banana rolled in pastry) April 13, 2016 (4:00-5:30pm; UC Multipurpose Room): WCU Global Spotlight Series: Africa in World Affairs Join us for the last Global Spotlight Series of the semester. Presenters include: Dr. Jackie Sievert, Dr. Saheed Aderinto, Dr. Mike McDonald, and Dr. Jennifer Schiff. Sponsored by: Political Science, History, and International Studies. April 21-22, 2016: Professor Kwesi Yankah We are honored to have Professor Kwesi Yankah from Ghana joining us as part of the campus theme celebration. Professor Yankah is a world-renowned scholar on African proverbs. He is currently the president of Central University College, the largest private university in Ghana. Previously, he was the pro-vice chancellor (provost) at the University of Ghana, the preeminent university in Ghana. He is a former professor of linguistics. Professor Yankah earned his doctoral degree at Indiana University. Professor Yankah will give a campus wide lecture, Between 9-11 and national tragedies in Africa: Comparative perspectives, on Thursday, April 21 at 4pm. In addition, he will be available to visit classes on Friday, April 22. If you are teaching a Friday class that addresses issues on Africa and would like for Dr. Yankah to visit your class, please contact Dr. Kofi Lomotey right away. Please encourage students to attend the lecture on April 21. Click here for more information and the complete calendar CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond the Glass Matrix 5/29/2017 Water Portraits: Barbara Tyroler 6/9/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' 6/10/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 20, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | David Cook will perform in concert at WCU on April 28. NOTEWORTHY NEWS ‘American Idol’ winner David Cook to perform at WCU’s Spring Concert on April 28 “American Idol” season seven winner David Cook and Secondhand Serenade will perform during Western Carolina University’s Spring Concert at 8 p.m. on Thursday, April 28. The concert will take place on the Central Plaza. In the event of rain, the concert will move to the Ramsey Regional Activity Center with doors opening at 7 p.m. The free concert is sponsored by Last Minute Productions, Student Government Association and the Department of Campus Activities. WCU students were polled in February, and Cook and Secondhand Serenade were the top two performers chosen. Also performing will be local group Ten More Years. Since winning “American Idol,” Cook’s self-titled debut album has sold 1.5 million copies. His follow-up album, “This Loud Morning,” debuted in Billboard’s top 10, before Cook became an indie artist. He moved to Nashville in 2012 and became a songwriter, while continuing to tour. In 2014, Cook began recording his current album, “Digital Vein,” in his home recording studio. The project was funded in part by contributions from fans through a PledgeMusic campaign. In 2012, Secondhand Serenade, otherwise known as musician John Vesely, saw his album, “A Naked Twist in My Story,” peak at No. 58 on the iTunes Top 200 albums list, as well as No. 19 on its top Alternative list. His current album, which was funded entirely by his fans via PledgeMusic, is scheduled to be released this spring. For more information on the Spring Concert, contact Stephanie Sue Rowell at 828-227-3751. CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 13, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | ACHIEVEMENTS Anantatmula’s text about project teams published BEP Business Expert Press has just released a new text by Vittal Anantatmula, professor and director of WCU’s Master of Project Management Program, titled “Project Teams: A Structured Development Approach.” The publisher’s description of the work says, “This book creates a structured approach and presents key concepts about the importance of teams, development of teams, team process, management of teams, and transitioning them into productive teams for enhanced project performance.” The book is expected to be in stock on Wednesday, April 27. Tags: Vittal Anantatmula CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 6, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | Paws, WCU’s athletics mascot, gets ready for Autism Awareness Week by asking a pertinent question. TOP STORIES Autism Awareness Week to include workshop, panel discussion, 5-K race Last fall, the number of Western Carolina University students self-identifying themselves as having autism spectrum disorder doubled from the previous year, reflective of a nationwide trend as individuals with autism make up an increasingly higher percentage of the college-age population. WCU’s Office of Disability Services is sponsoring Autism Awareness Week on campus from Monday, April 11, through Friday, April 15, to educate the campus community on best practices for working with individuals with autism, to help prepare faculty and staff for the shift in the student population, and to increase awareness, understanding and acceptance, said Meredith Oakley, a graduate intern in the office who has been working with Wesley Satterwhite, WCU’s director of disability services, to organize the week of activities. “Students with autism live in residence halls, work on campus, go to the Campus Recreation Center, eat in the dining halls, go to advising meetings, attend classes, and participate in clubs and organizations,” Oakley said. “There are no areas on WCU’s campus that are not touched by students, staff or faculty with autism. “We are trying to provide support for these Catamounts, their families and their friends through this week and get our campus thinking about the best ways we can support and interact with members of the autism spectrum community.” Activities begin April 11 as staff from the Office of Disability Services join with members of Alpha Xi Delta sorority on the lawn of A.K. Hinds University Center to talk to WCU community members about autism and sign people up to participate in a 5-K race the sorority is sponsoring on April 15. Alpha Xi Delta’s philanthropy area is Autism Speaks, an autism science and advocacy organization, and proceeds from the race will benefit that organization. Tuesday, April 12, will be “Wear Blue Day” on WCU’s campus as members of the university community are asked to wear blue in support of their fellow Catamounts who have autism. A workshop for faculty and staff, “College Students on the Autism Spectrum,” will be held from noon until 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 13, to highlight best practices for working with students with autism. The event in Multipurpose Room A of Hinds University Center will feature Jean Alvarez, former assistant director of disability services at WCU, who is now disability services coordinator at Asheville- Buncombe Technical Community College. Alvarez has been affiliated with the N.C. Autism Society for more than a decade and is extremely knowledgeable about the autistic population, Oakley said. Attendees are invited to bring their lunch. WCU’s College of Education and Allied Professions will host an autism “Diversity Dialogue” panel discussion from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Thursday, April 14, in Room 102 of Killian Building. Participants will include a current student who has autism. Alpha Xi Delta’s “Light It Up Blue” 5-K race will begin at 7 p.m. April 15 at the Central Plaza. The fee will be $10, and the first 30 runners who sign up receive a T-shirt. Registration is available online at http://events.autismspeaksu.org/faf/home/default.asp? ievent=1156679 or on the University Center lawn on April 11. More information is available by contacting Katlyn Smith at kdsmith15@catamount.wcu.edu. WCU’s Autism Awareness Week comes during April, which is national Autism Awareness Month. “Students on the autism spectrum add to the diversity and richness of the university community,” Satterwhite said. “These students have much to contribute to the academic, social and cultural environment at WCU. It is our hope that with increased awareness and understanding, we will also see greater acceptance of our students with autism and the unique perspectives they provide.” For more information about Autism Awareness Week, contact Satterwhite at wsatterwhite@wcu.edu or Oakley at mnoakley@wcu.edu. By Randall Holcombe CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT Tags: Autism © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 13, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | Herb Bailey ACHIEVEMENTS Bailey teaches career development courses for colleagues Herb Bailey, director of gift planning at WCU, taught modules VIII and IX of the Certified Fundraising Executive Review Course for the Western North Carolina Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals on Tuesday, April 5, and Wednesday, April 6. The two-day conference was held on the Asheville campus of Lenoir-Rhyne University. Bailey will be speaking on the topic “Increasing your ROI: The 3-Part Ask” for an AFP luncheon at The Renaissance Asheville Hotel, 31 Woodfin Street in Asheville, from 11:45 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 20. Registration is available through Tuesday, April 19, at this link. Tags: Herb Bailey CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 20, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | NOTEWORTHY NEWS Bands unite to present spring concert April 26 The Western Carolina University Concert Band and Symphonic Band will take the stage at the John W. Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 26, to perform their final concert of the spring semester. The Concert Band, under the direction of David Starnes, director of WCU’s award-winning Pride of the Mountains Marching Band, and Margaret Underwood, visiting director of bands and assistant professor of music, will feature works by Vaughan Williams, Grundman, Young, La Plante and Bryant. The performance will also feature guest conductor Mark Ewing Jr., the winner of the student concerto competition. The Symphonic Band, under the direction of Starnes, will perform works by Bach, Grainger, Dello Joio, and a new piece by David Biedenbender. They also will be welcoming Underwood as a guest conductor. Admission is free and the concert is open to the public. For more information, call WCU’s School of Music at 828-227-7242. CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 13, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | The WCU community created and autographed painted footprints in support of a barefoot walk-a-thon in October, 2015. NOTEWORTHY NEWS ‘Barefoot Games’ to be held on WCU campus to help put shoes on feet Western Carolina University will host fun competition for the 􀀭􂵲rst-ever “Barefoot Games” on campus Saturday, April 23, to raise awareness and funds for Samaritan’s Feet, a global humanitarian aid organization. The games, open to WCU students, will consist of an ultimate Frisbee tournament and a 500 meter relay, with entrants required to go barefoot. Competition starts at 11 a.m. at the Catamount Athletic Complex. All proceeds from the event will be used to send shoes to children in South Africa and elsewhere, part of a continuing e􀀵􃕯ort by WCU’s Center for Service Learning and the university’s learning theme “Africa! More Than a Continent.” Teams of 􀀭􂵶ve will seek sponsorships from friends, family, classmates and the community to raise money. A minimum of two sponsors per person is required. “This event is a great opportunity for classes and groups to get involved, as well as having a team building experience for a greater purpose,” said Josh Vance, a WCU junior from Denver and games organizer. “I encourage everyone to sign up at www.tinyurl.com/SamaritiansFeet so we can reach above and beyond our goals for Samaritan’s Feet.” Lane Perry, director of the Center for Service Learning, said the student committee helping guide the Barefoot Games “deserves a lot of credit for their creativity, energy and steadfastness” to bring about the event. The deadline for team sign-ups is 5 p.m. Wednesday, April 20. For more information, contact Vance at jlvance2@catamount.wcu.edu. Tags: Barefoot Games, Lane Perry, service learning CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond the Glass Matrix 5/29/2017 Water Portraits: Barbara Tyroler 6/9/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' 6/10/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 27, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | Chancellor Belcher shares a hug with a well-wishing student at a rally in support of his battle against a serious health concern. TOP STORIES Campus community rallies to show support for chancellor About 250 members of the Western Carolina University community braved rain showers to gather for a noon rally Friday, April 22, to show their support for Chancellor David O. Belcher, who is dealing with a health issue. Belcher announced to the university community Thursday, April 21, that he has been diagnosed with a small brain tumor, which is having an e􀀭􂵥ect on his speech and expression, a condition called expressive aphasia. “The purpose (of the rally) is simply love and support for him as he has consistently shown for Western Carolina University,” Dale Carpenter, dean of WCU’s College of Education and Allied Professions, said in a message to campus encouraging participation in the event. Carpenter led the crowd in a chant of “WCU loves and supports Chancellor Belcher,” which also adorned a large banner held by several of the rally participants. Belcher received hugs and well wishes from numerous students, faculty and sta􀀭􂴬, and a group of students spontaneously broke into a rendition of the university’s alma mater. In his announcement to campus, Belcher said he does not yet have many speci􀀶􃙣cs to share, but that he is optimistic as he engages with medical specialists to learn more about his condition. “I felt it important that you hear this news immediately and directly from me. I know that you care deeply for our university and I also know that you care for me personally. I am sure that this news will prompt many questions, many of which I cannot currently answer,” he said. “Please know, however, that the members of Executive Council and I have a robust plan in place to ensure that we continue to move the university forward,” Belcher said. He said that he remains fully committed as chancellor of WCU and will ful􀀶􃙬ll his executive responsibilities even when not on campus, although he will be curtailing many of his personal speaking appearances. Belcher announced that Provost Alison Morrison-Shetlar will be his primary representative when he is unavailable. The complete text of his email to campus can be found here: http://www.wcu.edu/discover/leadership/office-of-the-chancellor/personal-message. aspx By Bill Studenc Tags: Chancellor CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond the Glass Matrix 5/29/2017 Water Portraits: Barbara Tyroler 6/9/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' 6/10/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 20, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | Catamount Singers and Electric Soul perform in concert April 22. NOTEWORTHY NEWS Catamount Singers, Electric Soul to perform on campus Western Carolina University’s Catamount Singers and Electric Soul, an auditioned student group of 12 vocalists and 12 instrumentalists, will perform a spring concert at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 22. The performance will take place in the John W. Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center. Admission is free. The theme is “Blame It on the Boogie,” a celebration of song and dance that features hits by artists such as Adele, Lady Gaga, the Jackson 5, Pentatonix, Walk the Moon, Megan Trainor and others. The program will be accompanied by a multimedia slideshow and live video close-ups of the group in performance. In addition to campus concerts, the group regularly performs across Western North Carolina and for public schools throughout the Southeast. Next up are concerts in Nashville in May. WCU music faculty members Bruce Frazier and Jon Henson lead the student performers. Frazier is a composer, conductor and educator and WCU’s Carol Grotnes Belk Endowed Professor in Commercial and Electronic Music. Henson is WCU’s assistant director of athletic bands. For more information, go to www.catamountsingersandelectricsoul.com. CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 27, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | EVENTS CEAP Scholarship Golf Tournament, June 11 If you’re wondering how to work more golf into your summer and you want to support scholarships for students in the College of Education and Allied Professions, please consider playing in our golf tournament on Saturday, June 11, at Crooked Creek in Hendersonville. You only need a set of clubs, $80 (pretty good for a tournament that includes your lunch), and one friend (this is a two-person scramble). And if you don’t have a friend, we’ll find you one. Print the attachment, 􀀱􃅬ll it out and send it in, or just email me back with the important stu􀀳􃌠 from the entry form. You can pay on the day of the tournament. I just need to know how many people we have playing. I hope you’ll play with us in June. David Claxton CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 27, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | Students gather with their bowls and ceramics program coordinator Heather Mae Erickson (right) before packaging them for the Empty Bowl event at the Community Table in downtown Sylva. Members of the community select their favorite bowl to take home from dozens made by area potters — including 100 from WCU contributors. TOP STORIES Ceramics students create bowls for fundraiser Heather Mae Erickson and students in her advanced ceramics class, along with student members of the Mudcat Club – WCU’s ceramics club – created 100 handmade bowls for the Empty Bowl event Friday, April 22, benefiting The Community Table in Sylva. “That’s about double what we donated last year,” said Erickson, assistant professor of ceramics and coordinator of the program. “The students took part in community scholarship by helping to set up, run and engage with the guests about ceramics, bowls and WCU.” Students involved in the e􀀴􃑯ort said that they also benefited from their participation. “As an intro ceramics student who has an interest in the 􀀵􃕥eld, it was really cool to see not only how many potters participated, but how they also came together for such a charitable event,” said Laura Casas, a student taking the introductory ceramics course. Suzanne Rose, a master’s of education candidate and 2015 WCU graduate with a bachelor’s degree in 􀀵􃕮ne art, said she had donated bowls through the WCU Ceramics department for three years. “But this was the 􀀵􃕲rst year I was able to attend the event,” Rose said. “Despite the rainy weather, it was exciting to see how many people in the community came out to support The Community Table. I had a great time volunteering with some of my fellow classmates and ceramicists while interacting with the community, restocking the bowls, and even helping a few people make the tough decision of which bowl to take home. I look forward to attending next year.” Another student, BFA candidate Kimberly Fansler, said she appreciated seeing all parties bene􀀵􃕴t from the event. “Participating in the annual Empty Bowl fundraiser has been a great opportunity for me to contribute to our community in a creative way. I think it’s great that, with this event, people get to take home a piece of handcrafted art and at the same time are giving to those in need,” Fansler said. Attendees paid $20 at the door to receive their choice of a handmade bowl made by local potters, as well as enjoy soups and desserts while listening to live music at the event. All proceeds bene􀀵􃕴ted The Community Table’s mission to provide nutritious meals to neighbors in need in a welcoming environment. To learn more about the organization, see its website at http://www.communitytable.org/index.htm. For more information about the club, class, program or WCU’s participation in the event, contact Erickson at 828-227-3595 or by email at hmerickson@wcu.edu. By Keith Brenton Tags: College of Fine and Performing Arts, Heather Mae Erickson, The Community Table CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 6, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | WCU’s production of the classic musical “Gypsy” features students (clockwise from top left) Elena Maria Cope (Mama Rose), Michael Gallagher (Herbie), Kylee Verho􀀰􃀠 (Louise/Gypsy) and Kelsey Aycock (June). TOP STORIES Classic musical ‘Gypsy’ to be staged April 14-17 as Mainstage season continues Western Carolina University’s School of Stage and Screen continues its spring Mainstage theatre season as the beloved classic musical “Gypsy” opens Thursday, April 14. Performances are scheduled at WCU’s John W. Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center at 7:30 p.m. April 14 through Saturday, April 16, and at 3 p.m. Sunday, April 17. “Gypsy,” with book by Arthur Laurents, lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, and music by Jule Styne, is loosely based on the memoir of Gypsy Rose Lee, a notorious burlesque performer. The story centers around Mama Rose, a larger-than-life stage mother and impresario to her daughters, June and Louise. The family story unfolds as the Vaudeville era comes to an end and is replaced by the burgeoning “talkies.” “Gypsy” combines family drama with the glitz and glamor of show business, and intimate and heartfelt character songs are interlaced with highly spirited numbers, said Jayme McGhan, director of the School of Stage and Screen. The production is accompanied by a 22-piece live orchestra. Elena Maria Cope, a senior musical theatre major from Sylva, takes on the role of Mama Rose, and Michael Gallagher, a senior acting major from Morrisville, plays her love interest, Herbie. Louise/Gypsy is played by Kylee Verho􀀰􃀬, a junior musical theatre major from Jacksonville, and that character’s sister, June, is portrayed by Kelsey Aycock, a sophomore musical theatre major from Henderson. The large ensemble of theatre and musical theatre students is supplemented by a cast of child performers from the Cullowhee and Sylva areas, as well as a few live animals. Students and faculty from the School of Stage and Screen are thrilled to have Sarah Norris, a New York City-based director and artistic director of New Light Theatre Project, guest directing the production, McGhan said. Others contributing to the show are Katya Stanislavskaya, music direction; John Scacchetti, choreography; Andrew Mannion, set design; Susan Brown-Strauss, costume design; Daniel Gonko, sound design; David Bortle, lighting design; and Miranda Poindexter, properties mistress. The production contains adult themes and uses strobe lighting effects. The April 16 presentation of “Gypsy” will be the centerpiece of an evening of fundraising activities organized by WCU’s Friends of the Arts to benefit students in the College of Fine and Performing Arts. For more information, visit the Friends of the Arts website at foa.wcu.edu. Tickets for “Gypsy” are $25 for adults, $20 for senior citizens and WCU faculty and sta􀀰􃀬, and $10 for students. Tickets are available by contacting the Bardo Arts Center box office at 828-227-2479 or online at bardoartscenter.wcu.edu. — Contributed information Tags: College of Fine and Performing Arts, School of Stage and Screen CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond the Glass Matrix 5/29/2017 Water Portraits: Barbara Tyroler 6/9/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' 6/10/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 20, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | As students in Western Carolina University’s Film and Television Production Program, Grant Gilliard and Samantha Hunt worked with classmates on “The Radical Notion of Gene Mutation,” which was screened at the 2014 Controlled Chaos Film Festival. NOTEWORTHY NEWS Controlled Chaos Film Festival, featuring the best of student productions, returns to WCU Films created by Western Carolina University students will be screened at the eighth annual Controlled Chaos Film Festival in the John W. Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center at 7 p.m. Friday, April 29. Tickets are $10 cash at the door. Proceeds and donations bene􀀶􃙴t the Motion Picture Student Project Fund, which helps students in WCU’s Film and Television Production Program with the cost of creating their senior thesis films. “There are all sorts of student-made 􀀶􃙬lms that will be showcased, including this year’s senior project 􀀶􃙬lm, ‘Love is the Longest Con,’ and free food, photo ops and more,” said Mikayla Ronnow, a student spokesman for the festival. “I think it will be the perfect night to put on your fanciest black tie, if you’d like, and provide encouragement to your fellow students in support of their artistic efforts while having a fun evening out.” Along with “Love is the Longest Con,” there will be showings of a web series titled “Senior Nightmare,” two senior project documentaries and several other student-produced films. Several of the 􀀶􃙬lms have mature subject matter and are not suitable viewing for children. For more information, contact the Film and Television Production Program at 828-227-7491. Tags: Controlled Chaos CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond the Glass Matrix 5/29/2017 Water Portraits: Barbara Tyroler 6/9/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' 6/10/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 27, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | Polling closed at 9 a.m. Monday, April 25, for the 􀀣􂍮nal round of the “Top Adventure College” contest. TOP STORIES Could WCU be magazine’s ‘Top Adventure College’ again? Could it be three straight titles for Western Carolina University as the “Top Adventure College” in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic region? Blue Ridge Outdoors magazine is expected to announce the results of its online poll Monday, May 16, with a feature article. WCU is poised for a “tree-peat,” to coin a phrase drawing on the outdoors and avoiding trademark infringement with former Los Angeles Lakers head coach Pat Riley, who holds the copyright on the term “three-peat.” Following a “March Madness” theme, WCU progressed to the 􀀣􂍮nals to face Emory and Henry College, of Emory, Virginia. Voting for the top spot began at 1 p.m. Monday, April 18, and concluded 9 a.m. Monday, April 25. WCU has much going for it as an outdoor recreation hotspot, starting with location, location, location. Nestled in a scenic valley between the Blue Ridge and Great Smoky mountains, WCU is ideally located for mountain and road biking, hiking, rock climbing and rappelling, camping, paddle sports, fishing, skiing, and trail and road running. WCU opened a seven-mile multi-use trail system behind the Health and Human Sciences Building on its West Campus in 2013, o􀀿􃽥ering hiking, running and mountain biking activities to members of the campus and surrounding community. The university’s Base Camp Cullowhee, the outdoor programming unit at WCU, o􀀿􃽥ers dozens of outdoor recreation trips to students annually, provides experiential education services and has an equipment rental service. Among the academic programs o􀀿􃽥ered by WCU of interest to students pursuing careers in the outdoors are forest resource management, hospitality and tourism management, natural resources conservation and management, and parks and recreation management. Blue Ridge Outdoors is a monthly magazine for outdoor sports, health and adventure travel in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic, distributed from Baltimore to Atlanta. Learn more at www.blueridgeoutdoors.com. By Geoff Cantrell Tags: Top Adventure College CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 20, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | NOTEWORTHY NEWS Counseling and Psychological Services receives internship grant The Counseling and Psychological Services Center at Western Carolina University has received a grant of $7,900 from the American Psychological Association to help with the accreditation of the center’s internship program through APA. “As of February, we submitted our self-study for initial accreditation for our internship program to the American Psychological Association, and used a portion of the grant funds to pay for the application fee,” said Jay Manalo, training director at CAPS. “APA accreditation is considered the highest level of accreditation for a psychology internship program.” Manalo coordinates the internship program for psychology doctoral students from various universities who come to WCU for a year to train as part of a clinical internship. In addition to application fees, the grant is being used to offset the cost of the application fee for initial accreditation, site visit fees, and the first year of accreditation fees if CAPS is successfully granted APA accreditation. The grant is in effect until April 30, 2018. For more information about CAPS and the center’s use of the grant funding, contact Manalo by email at mjmanalo@wcu.edu or by phone at 828-227-7469. To learn more about the grant itself, see the APA’s informational web page at http://www.apa.org/about/awards/internship-program-grants.aspx?tab=4. Tags: Jay Manalo CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 20, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | ACHIEVEMENTS Crow contributes to new text on dissertation research Robert Crow, assistant professor of educational research at WCU, is a contributing author to the newly published text “Contemporary Approaches to Dissertation Development and Research Methods.” The book was edited by Valerie A. Storey, associate professor in the School of Teaching and Learning, University of Central Florida, and Kristina A. Hesbol, assistant professor of educational leadership and policy studies, University of Denver. The work, published by IGI Global, is available in hardcover and e-access editions. The publisher’s description of the book describes it as a “reference source that focuses on current models used for doctoral dissertations and how these techniques impact future research and knowledge in various scholarly fields.” CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 20, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | EVENTS Data Management and Archiving Workshop, April 21 Data Management and Archiving Workshop, April 21 | 2 – 3 p.m. | UC Dogwood Room | Presenters: Mark Sto􀀩􂥡an, head of Digital Access and Technology Services; Liz Skene, Digital Initiatives librarian. An increasing number of grant funders require a data management plan describing the storage, protection and dissemination of data after a research project. With the tools available at WCU, researchers can accomplish this task quickly and effectively, improving their chance at funding. Come learn what data management is, why it is important, and how to create a data management plan to satisfy funders’ requirements. You will also see a demonstration of the Data Management Plan Tool that provides templates and a librarian review of your DMP. RSVP to Jan Riggs at pgriggs@wcu.edu. CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 20, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | Holt’s WCU performance will be featured in the series’ second season. NOTEWORTHY NEWS ‘David Holt’s State of Music’ picked up by PBS as series The Emmy-nominated TV series “David Holt’s State of Music,” including an episode featuring a Western Carolina University show, will appear on Public Broadcasting Service stations across the country. The traditional music series, presented by UNC Center for Public TV, is produced by WCU alumnus Will McIntyre and directed by his wife, Deni. The host is traditional music icon David Holt. The WCU performance took place last Nov. 22, on the stage of John W. Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center to a packed house. It will be broadcast in the second season of the show. Acts joining Holt that day were international sensation Rhiannon Giddens of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, award-winning bluegrass favorites Balsam Range, emerging ballad singer Josh Goforth, and the African-American gospel duo of Wilbur Tharpe and Lena Mae Perry, performing as The Branchettes. Holt will be inducted into the North Carolina Music Hall of Fame in October 2016. In addition to hosting the PBS series, he tours extensively with his group David Holt and the Lightning Bolts and with Goforth. For more information go to www.davidholttv.org. Tags: David Holt, Music CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond the Glass Matrix 5/29/2017 Water Portraits: Barbara Tyroler 6/9/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' 6/10/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 13, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | EVENTS Earth and Wellness Celebration, April 22 Western Carolina University’s April 22, 2016 | UC Lawn This free event combines the national celebration of Earth Day along with health and wellness. It will consist of several booths from our community including vendors, non-profits, and student organizations. In addition, there will be educational activities, games, and tons of freebies. Come join us and have some fun! Schedule: 10:30 am: Inaugural Sustainable Energy Initiative: A Sneak-Peak Reveal! (Electron Garden on the Green) 11:00 am – noon: Walking tour: WCU hiking trail and Nature-Based Sculpture Project (Electron Garden on the Green) 11:00 am – 2:00 pm: Games, free giveaways, educational activities, vendors, community and student organizations. (UC Lawn) 11:00 am: “MountainTrue: Environmental Activism and Advocacy in WNC” Susan Beam, Community Engagement Manager, MountainTrue (UC Raleigh Room) 12:00 pm: Drum Circle (UC Lawn) 12:20 pm: “Cherokees and Rivers” Barbara R. Duncan, Ph.D. Education Director (UC Raleigh Room) 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm: LIVE MUSIC! Lognoggins (Catafount) 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm: Walking tour of WCU public art (Bell Tower) For questions please contact Lauren Bishop at 227-3562 or lbishop@wcu.edu . CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 20, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | Construction continues on the concrete footers for the Electron Garden on the Green. TOP STORIES Earth and Wellness Celebration coming up Friday A preview of Western Carolina University’s new Electron Garden on the Green and presentations focusing on environmental advocacy and the Cherokees’ relationship with rivers top the agenda for WCU’s Earth and Wellness Celebration. The annual campus celebration, which coincides with the observance of Earth Day this Friday, April 22, will begin at 10:30 a.m. with a “sneak peek reveal” at the site of the Electron Garden on the Green, which is still under construction. A project of WCU’s Sustainable Energy Initiative, the “EGG” is believed to be the first combination solar power generating facility and hammock “hanging lounge” on any college campus in the nation. Concrete footers are now being created that will provide a support base for the EGG’s 40 solar panels that will convert sunlight into electricity. It is being constructed in green space across Memorial Drive from Walker Residence Hall, near Cullowhee Creek, and also will have hanging space for about 10 hammocks, Internet and USB ports, and electrical outlets. The EGG preview will include remarks from WCU Provost Alison Morrison- Shetlar and students who have been involved in the EGG’s design and financing through a student fee. Beginning at 11 a.m., a walking tour will be offered from the EGG site that will feature a second project of WCU’s Sustainable Energy Initiative – the Nature-Based Sculpture Project. That project has brought a team of artists to campus to help create a site-specific art experience inspired by the Great Smoky Mountains – a sculpture made of reclaimed wood that will be created adjacent to the university’s multi-use trail. The artist team will be in residence on campus through Saturday, May 21. The Earth and Wellness Celebration also will take place on the lawn of A.K. Hinds University Center, where games, give-a-ways and educational activities will be going on from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The first of two presentations will begin at 11 a.m. as Susan Bean, community engagement manager for the regional conservation organization MountainTrue, speaks on “Environmental Activism and Advocacy in Western North Carolina” in the Raleigh Room at Hinds University Center. Bean’s talk will be followed at 12:20 p.m. in the Raleigh Room by a presentation on “Cherokees and Rivers” by Barbara Duncan, education director for the Museum of the Cherokee Indian in Cherokee. Other activities included in the Earth and Wellness Celebration are a drum circle on the University Center lawn from noon to 1:30 p.m.; musical entertainment featuring the Lognoggins on the Central Plaza from 1 to 2 p.m.; and a walking tour of WCU public art that starts from the Alumni Tower at 2 p.m. The celebration is sponsored by WCU’s Office of Sustainability and Energy Management, and Campus Recreation and Wellness. For more information about the Earth and Wellness Celebration, contact Lauren Bishop, director of the Office of Sustainability and Energy Management, at 828-227-3562 or lbishop@wcu.edu. Note: Organizers of WCU’s Earth and Wellness Celebration have released this revised schedule with venue changes due to inclement weather. 10:30 a.m.: Inaugural Sustainable Energy Initiative: A Sneak-Peak Reveal (University Center Raleigh Room) 11 a.m. – noon: Walking tour: WCU hiking trail and Nature-Based Sculpture Project (Meet at University Center Memorial Drive entrance) 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.: Games, free giveaways, educational activities, vendors, community and student organizations. (University Center Atrium) CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT 11 a.m.: “MountainTrue: Environmental Activism and Advocacy in WNC” with Susan Beam, Community Engagement Manager, MountainTrue (University Center Raleigh Room) Noon: Rally for Dr. Belcher! (Catafount) 12:20 p.m.: “Cherokees and Rivers” with Barbara R. Duncan, Education Director at the Museum of the Cherokee Indian (University Center Raleigh Room) 2 – 3 p.m.: Walking tour of WCU public art (Alumni Tower) By Randall Holcombe © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 27, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | EVENTS Engineering & Technology Symposium-Open House, April 29 You are invited to the WCU Engineering & Technology Annual Capstone Project Symposium Open House April 29, 2016 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Center for Applied Technology (CAT Building) CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 13, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | The Jackson County Farmers Market has become even more of an educational experience with the addition of a booth from WCU. TOP STORIES Faculty members to join in ‘Science at the Market Day’ at Jackson County Farmers Market Two academic departments from Western Carolina University are partnering with the Jackson County Farmers Market to present the first “Science at the Market Day” on Saturday, April 16. The free and family friendly event will begin at 8 a.m. at the farmers market located beside Bridge Park in Sylva. Scientists from WCU’s Department of Chemistry and Physics and Department of Biology will join local growers in giving presentations about the science of sustainable farming practices, nutritional eating, cooking, and creation of local crafts, s a i d Enrique Gomez, WCU associate professor of physics and astronomy. Hands-on activities for children will allow them to experience the behavior of bees, the inner structure of plants, and the chemistry of natural dyes, he said. “Jackson County Farmers Market farmers use plant biology to optimize the quantity and quality of sustainable produce,” Gomez said. “Beekeepers must understand insect biology to manage pathogens and provide pollination to farmers. Goat keepers use chemistry to prepare cheese sold locally. Chemists also help local craftspeople in preparing dyes for wool, also made locally. “Sharing the science of farming can help develop a community appreciation for the quality of the products that reach the market, the unique knowledge that local farmers and craftspeople have, and the environmental impact of various ways in which food is grown,” he said. The event at the Jackson County Farmers Market is one of more than 300 public events that are included in the statewide North Carolina Science Festival, which spans two weeks, April 8-24. The event in Sylva is funded through the festival’s Challenge Grant Program. More information about the festival can be found at ncsciencefestival.org. For more information about “Science at the Market Day,” contact Gomez at 828-227-2718. By Randall Holcombe Tags: Department of Biology, Department of Chemistry and Physics, Enrique Gomez CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 6, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | Representatives of the Sustainable Energy Initiative Committee, Base Camp Cullowhee and the Fine Art Museum meet at the university’s multi-use trail, site of a future public art project featuring a nature-based outdoor sculpture. They are (from left) Claire Lippy, Taylor Stack, Jeremiah Haas, Denise Drury Homewood, Lauren Bishop, Monica Suarez and Cole Sutton. TOP STORIES Fine Art Museum project bridges art, sustainability on campus A nature-based sculpture project launched by Western Carolina University’s Fine Art Museum will feature outdoors art while promoting discussion of sustainability and aesthetics on campus. The project will bring Camp Little Hope, a team of artists, to WCU to help create a site-speci􀀶􃙣c art experience inspired by the Great Smoky Mountains on the university’s multi-use trail. Walker Tufts, Mary Rothlisberger, Greg Stewart and Aislinn Penetecost-Farrin will be in residence on campus Friday, April 8, through Saturday, May 21. The Fine Art Museum will host a project orientation meeting led by Tufts at 11 a.m. Monday, April 11, in Room 130 of the John W. Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center for interested collaborators and volunteers. Volunteers can sign up to participate in the project at that time. The project is funded by the WCU Sustainable Energy Initiative, with support from the College of Fine and Performing Arts, Facilities Management, Base Camp Cullowhee, School of Art and Design, and the Fine Art Museum. The museum will be responsible for the installation and care of the outdoor exhibition as part of the university’s public art collection. The student-comprised Sustainability Energy Initiative Committee began taking proposals last year for environmentally-friendly ideas from WCU students, faculty and sta􀀼􃰠 to improve campus sustainability while providing educational value for students at the same time. The committee’s annual operating budget comes from a $5 per semester fee paid by students. “We were thrilled to receive the proposal for the nature-based sculpture,” said Zack Waldroup, a member of the committee and a WCU senior majoring in environmental science. “This project was unique in that it wasn’t what most people would think of as a sustainability project.” However, the use of natural materials as well as the project’s location on the campus trail system, which adds to the aesthetic appeal, meets requirements perfectly, while promoting environmental consciousness and heritage, he said. “Our committee is excited for the outcome of this project to show students that they can think of ‘out-of-the-box’ projects that can still fall within our requirements for funding,” Waldroup said. The outdoor sculpture will be titled “LUNG” and represent an intimate experience of the relationship between the lungs of visitors and hikers, and the lungs of the Earth. “The sculpture is inspired by the exhaled plant vapor that composes the ‘smoke’ of the Great Smoky Mountains,” said Tufts of Camp Little Hope. “Two great winding contraptions, representative of pipelines, nurse logs, ear horns, and old gramophone speakers, will twist along the paths. They will be created from reclaimed wood in a visual language that references both the old sawmills that used to operate in and around the Great Smoky Mountains and the regenerative nature of nurse logs in the deep forest. In addition to being recycled, biodegradable and living, the sculpture asks a deeper question about the sustainability of humans on the planet.” “Aesthetics and sustainability are the heart of this project,” said Denise Drury Homewood, executive director of WCU’s Fine Art Museum. “The artists will work with interdisciplinary teams of students to foster collaboration across the arts and sciences. During the residency, Tufts and the Camp Little Hope team will work with Great Smoky Mountains National Park educator Susan Sachs to bring interdisciplinary groups of students to the national park for an in-depth study of the flora and fauna of the region.” During fall semester 2015, a committee of representatives from across the WCU community narrowed down a list of potential artists from 44 to one. “I really have to say thank you to members of the artist selection committee: Lauren Bishop with the O􀁈􄡣ce of Sustainability and Energy Management; Galen May, university architect; Jeremiah Haas with Base Camp Cullowhee, Morgan Kennedy and Matt Liddle from the School of Art and Design; and Greg McPherson from the Fine Art Museum,” Drury Homewood said. For more information on the project, visit the website fineartmuseum.wcu.edu or contact Drury Homewood at ddrury@wcu.edu or 828-227-2550. For more information about the Sustainable Energy Initiative, visit the website energy.wcu.edu or contact the O􀁈􄡣ce of Sustainability and Energy CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT Management at lbishop@wcu.edu or 828-227-3562. By Geoff Cantrell Tags: Denise Drury Homewood, Fine Art Museum © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 13, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | NOTEWORTHY NEWS Fine Art Museum to host ‘Next Wave’ exhibition by first-year MFA students Western Carolina University’s Fine Art Museum is partnering with the WCU School of Art and Design to host an exhibition of works by 􀀯􂽲rst-year students in the Master of Fine Arts Program. The “Next Wave” exhibition runs Monday, April 18, through Friday, April 29, featuring work by Brendan Best, Ali Burnette, Javier Fox, G. Vincent Gaulin, Martha Neaves, Zach Rogers, Don Sawyer and Charlotte White. A public reception and performance will be held to close out the installation, from 4 to 6 p.m. April 29. “The MFA at WCU is an inter-disciplinary studio art program and creative research environment where ideas are given form,” said Tom Ashcraft, MFA Program director. “Through close association with a diverse faculty, visiting artists, scholars, and their peers, students develop a contextual and historical awareness of their psractice focusing on exploration, creative research, and art making. The MFA positions students to engage in conceptual strategies towards the independence necessary to navigate as professional artists and creative world citizens.” The Fine Art Museum is located in the John W. Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center and is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays, with extended hours on Thursdays to 7 p.m. Admission and parking are free. The museum is closed on university holidays and breaks. To learn more about the exhibition, contact Ashcraft at tdashcraft@wcu.edu. Tags: College of Fine and Performing Arts, Fine Art Museum CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond the Glass Matrix 5/29/2017 Water Portraits: Barbara Tyroler 6/9/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' 6/10/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 6, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | NOTEWORTHY NEWS Forum set with chancellor, provost for discussion about Staff Senate survey Western Carolina University’s Sta􀀦􂘠 Senate will hold an open forum Monday, April 11, for review and discussion about the results of a sta􀀦􂘠 survey conducted last fall. WCU Chancellor David O. Belcher and Provost Alison Morrison-Shetlar will be on hand to join in the discussion, which will be held in the Blue Ridge Conference Room from 2 to 4 p.m. Sta􀀦􂘠 Senate o􀀱􃅣cers report that the new survey continues to show the increasing overall satisfaction levels shown in the 2014 survey, with a strong majority of sta􀀦􂘠 members stating that WCU is a good place to work. However, an increasing percentage of sta􀀦􂘠 are indicating that they need to work more than 40 hours per week to finish their duties, up 8 percent from 2014. For more information about the forum and survey, email staffsenate@wcu.edu. Tags: Chancellor, Provost, Staff Senate CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 13, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | NOTEWORTHY NEWS Friends of the Arts anticipating ‘best ever’ spring fundraiser April 16 An increase in local sponsorships, fast-selling ra􀀥􂕥e tickets, unique auction items and an authentic Broadway-style experience are providing the right ingredients for Western Carolina University’s Friends of the Arts to have its “best ever” spring fundraiser, said WCU first lady Susan Belcher, chair of the event organizing committee. The Saturday, April 16, fundraiser will be focused around the WCU School of Stage and Screen’s production of “Gypsy,” part of its Mainstage theatre season. The event at the John W. Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center will help provide scholarships and programming for students in the university’s College of Fine and Performing Arts. “This is our fourth annual fundraiser, and I think the idea of combining a fun benefit evening with a WCU Mainstage musical is catching on,” said Belcher, wife of WCU Chancellor David O. Belcher. Based on the memoirs of Burlesque queen Gypsy Rose Lee, “Gypsy” brings “a special punch” to the evening with choreography by John Schiacchieti, who danced with Patti Lupone in the Broadway production, and guest direction by Sarah Norris of New York, Belcher said. The large cast, including children from local schools, will be accompanied by a 22-piece live orchestra. The production is rated PG for adult themes. “Audience members can come as early as 5 p.m., before the 7:30 p.m. curtain, to shop the silent auction, buy some great wine at bargain prices, and take a chance at a ra􀀥􂕥e that could win them $500 and two season tickets to all the WCU entertainment and sports events for next year,” Belcher said. Refreshments and a cash bar will be available. Admission to the benefit is free, but tickets are required for the performance of “Gypsy.” “Area merchants and individuals have donated exceptional auction items such as original Cherokee art, a truck load of mulch, Old Edwards and High Hampton golf, overnight stays at the Hilton Biltmore Park and at Sundrops on Caney Fork, and dining and spa certificates,” Belcher said. “This year’s ra􀀥􂕥e o􀁂􄉥ers an extraordinary collection of arts, cultural, sporting and one-of-a-kind events that showcase the outstanding work of students at WCU,” she said. “The lucky winner will receive 2016-17 season tickets to more than 20 campus arts and sporting events, chancellor’s box seats at WCU home football games, a faculty-selected student art piece and a $500 cash card for personal use.” Raffle tickets are $25 each, or 􀁃􄍶ve for $100. Ra􀀥􂕥e winners will be announced at “Gypsy” and tickets can be purchased anytime leading up to the event through the Bardo Arts Center box office at 828-227-2479. Tickets for “Gypsy,” priced at $25 for adults, $20 for seniors and WCU faculty and sta􀁂􄈬, and $10 for students, can be purchased through the box o􀁇􄝣ce or by visiting foa.wcu.edu. Top sponsors for the fundraiser, which also includes a sold-out gala dinner, include Entegra Bank, Harrah’s Cherokee Casino Resort and the Ascent Partnership, an initiative involving WCU and Harris Regional Hospital and Swain Community Hospital. They are joined in supporting the e􀁂􄉯ort by Evolution Wine Kitchen, F. Patrick McGuire Dentistry, Baxley’s Chocolates, WCU Catamount Athletics and Carolina West Radiology. WCU’s Friends of the Arts organization is currently celebrating its 􀁃􄍦fth year, and since its inception has raised more than $870,000 in support of WCU’s College of Fine and Performing Arts, $87,000 of which was raised at last year’s spring fundraising event. The group hopes to reach the $1 million mark at this year’s spring fundraiser. Friends of the Arts holds two events per year, including the spring bene􀁃􄍴t and a fall membership drive concert. The group o􀁂􄉥ers multiple levels of membership for anyone wishing to provide support throughout the year. More information can be found at foa.wcu.edu. Tags: Friends of the Arts CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 13, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | EVENTS Friends of the Arts Benefit, 5 p.m., April 16 Friends of the Arts Benefit featuring the musical “Gypsy”, Silent Auction & a “Let WCU Entertain You” Raffle Benefit: Saturday April 16th, 5-7:30 p.m., includes silent auction, wine cork pull, raffle drawing, appetizers and cash bar | FREE “Gypsy”: April 14-16, 7:30 p.m. and April 17, 3 p.m. | John W. Bardon Fine and Performing Arts Center | Tickets required Click for complete information and to buy tickets CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 27, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | ACHIEVEMENTS Geology students, faculty present at conference Current and former geology students and faculty from Western Carolina were a “heavy presence” in presenting research at the southeastern sectional meeting of the Geological Society of America, according to Mark Lord, professor of geology and head of the Department of Geosciences and Natural Resources. Eight talks, 12 posters and 20 abstracts were presented by 13 faculty and 35 student/recent graduate/recent 􀀲􃉲rst graduate authors at the conference held in Columbia, South Carolina, in late March. Presentations represented the disciplines of hydrology, geomorphology, tectonics/structure, paleontology, coastal processes and geoscience education. “Undergraduate research remains a hallmark of the geology program,” Lord said. “By graduation, over three-quarters of our majors have presented their research at a professional conference – many of them multiple times. All geology and earth science education students complete authentic research during their senior year. “We’re the only geology program in the state with this requirement.” Student authors included Kat Allen, Morgan Beldon, Joe Brazelton, Micheal Cato, Kyle Cocoran, Lauren Dodgin, Gracie Erwin, Jesse Gatlin, Allison Haddon, Sean Hartigan, Rainee Howard, Stacie Howard, Holly Hurding-Jones, Cecilia Lily, Leslie Montoya, Bryant Mountjoy and Marcy Reiford. Recent WCU graduates who authored presentations were Michael Keever, Bailey Donovan, Chris Dunlap, Christopher Ward and Rachel Salter. Faculty and sta􀀿􃼠 presenters in addition to Lord were Frank Forcino, assistant professor of geology; Trip Krenz, assistant professor of geosciences and natural resources; Emily Sta􀀿􃽯ord, geology instructor; J.P. Gannon, assistant professor of geology; Amy Fagan, assistant professor of geology; Dave Kinner, associate professor of geology; Jerry Miller, Whitmire Distinguished Professor of Environmental Science; Ben Tanner, associate professor of geology; Cheryl Waters-Tormey, associate professor of geology; Rob Young, professor of geology and director of the Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines; Blair Tormey, adjunct instructor in geology and researcher for the PSDS; and Katie Peek, research scientist for the PSDS. For more information about the conference and/or the program, contact Lord at 828-227-2271 or by email at mlord@wcu.edu. CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 13, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | EVENTS Global Spotlight Series, 4 p.m., April 13, UC Multipurpose Room Join us for the last Global Spotlight Series of the semester Global Spotlight on: Africa in World Affairs Wednesday, April 13, 2016 | 4 – 5:30 p.m. UC Multipurpose Room Presenters: Dr. Jackie Sievert, Political Science and Public Affairs – Introductory Remarks Dr. Saheed Aderinto, History – Transition Without End: Politics and Democracy in Post Cold War Africa Dr. Mike McDonald, Political Science and Public Affairs – Economic and Human Development in Africa: Successes and Remaining Challenges Dr. Jennifer Schiff, Political Science and Public Affairs – Africa’s Environmental Challenges – Desertification, Water Scarcity, and Food Insecurity Sponsored by: Political Science; History; International Studies CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 6, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | NOTEWORTHY NEWS Global Spotlight Series looks at Africa’s role in world affairs Western Carolina University will host a Global Spotlight Series event on “Africa in World Affairs” on campus Wednesday, April 13. The 4 to 5:30 p.m. event in the Multipurpose Room of A.K. Hinds University Center is free and open to the public, and is the 􀀱􃅮nal presentation of this semester’s series of panel discussions on national and international issues. Africa is the focus of a two-year interdisciplinary learning theme ongoing at WCU. The theme allows faculty, students and sta􀀳􃌬, as well as campus o􀀴􃑣ces and organizations, to explore and connect with Africa in a broader context of politics and policy, as well as history, culture, arts and heritage. The scheduled Global Spotlight Series presentations: Jackie Sievert, assistant professor in the Political Science and Public Affairs Department, introductory remarks. Saheed Aderinto, assistant professor in the Department of History, “Transition without End: Politics and Democracy in Post-Cold War Africa.” Mike McDonald, lecturer in international relations and comparative politics in the Political Science and Public Affairs Department, “Economic and Human Development in Africa: Successes and Remaining Challenges.” Jennifer Schiff, assistant professor in the Political Science and Public Affairs Department, “Africa’s Environmental Challenges: Desertification, Water Scarcity, and Food Insecurity.” The event is sponsored by the Political Science and Public A􀀳􃍡airs Department, History Department and the International Studies Program. For more information, contact Niall Michelsen at 828-227-3336 or michelsen@email.wcu.edu. Tags: Africa, Global Spotlight Series, History, Jackie Sievert, Jennifer Schiff, Mike McDonald, Niall Michelsen, Political Science and Public Affairs, Saheed Aderinto CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 13, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | NOTEWORTHY NEWS Grant-writing workshop offered at Biltmore Park A grant-writing workshop for WCU faculty, sta􀀨􂠠 and students will be o􀀨􂡥ered Thursday, April 14, at the university’s instructional site at Biltmore Park Town Square in Asheville. Erika Thompson and Frank Grae􀀨􂠬, sta􀀨􂠠 members at the Grants Resource Center in Washington, D.C., are o􀀨􂡥ering the free workshops to individuals interested in pursuing grant funding. The schedule includes proposal development tips from 9 to 10:30 a.m., information about health and human services opportunities from 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m., and private consultations by appointment from 1:15 to 2:45 p.m. The sessions will take place in conference room 344. The workshop at Biltmore Park, and one held on WCU’s Cullowhee campus Wednesday, April 13, are sponsored by the university’s O􀀶􃙣ce of Research Administration. The Grants Resource Center is a service of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. To sign up for the Biltmore Park workshop, contact Pan Riggs at pgriggs@wcu.edu. Tags: Biltmore Park, Research CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 6, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | EVENTS Grantwriting Workshops offered April 13, 14 Grantwriting Workshops offered: Wednesday, April 13 – Cullowhee – UC Raleigh Room 8:30 a.m. – Welcome and introductions 9-10:30 a.m. – Applying to the US Department of Education and select education foundations 10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. – Finding federal funding for undergraduate research 1:15 – 2:45 p.m. – Opportunities in health and human services via HHS / NIH / HRSA 3 – 5 pm. – Private consultations Thursday, April 14 – Biltmore Park – BP Conference Room 344 8:30 a.m. – Welcome and introductions 9 – 10:30 a.m. – Proposal development tips 10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. – HHS / NIH / HRSA 1:15 – 2:45 p.m. – Private consultations Sponsored by WCU’s Office of Research Administration Please RSVP to Pan Riggs, pgriggs@wcu.edu The Grants Resource Center is a service of AASCU / http://www.aascu.org/grc/ CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 27, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | Carmen Huffman TOP STORIES High-achieving faculty, staff honored during ceremony The best of Western Carolina University’s teaching, scholarship and service for academic year 2015-16 was recognized Friday (April 22) during the annual spring Faculty and Staff Excellence Awards ceremony held in the Grandroom of A.K. Hinds University Center. Top teaching awards honored the achievements of Carmen Hu􀀲􃉭man, associate professor in the Department of Chemistry and Physics, who is WCU’s 2016 recipient of the University of North Carolina Board of Governors Award for Excellence in Teaching, and Sudhir Kaul, assistant professor in the Department of Engineering and Technology, who received WCU’s Chancellor’s Distinguished Teaching Award. Hu􀀲􃉭man is among 17 recipients of the UNC teaching honor and will receive her award during WCU’s undergraduate commencement that begins at 10 a.m. Saturday, May 7. WCU staff members recognized for the exemplary quality of their work were Dawn Brown, technology support specialist with the Division of Information Technology, Star Sta􀀲􃈠 Award; Anne Lane, administrative support associate with the Mountain Heritage Center, Bright Idea Sta􀀲􃈠 Award; Irene Welch, business o􀀼􃱣cer in the budget o􀀼􃱣ce, Judy H. Dowell Outstanding Support Sta􀀲􃈠 Award; and Jane Adams- Dunford, assistant vice chancellor in the Division of Student A􀀲􃉡airs, Paul A. Reid Distinguished Service Award for Administrative Staff. Teaching, scholarship and service honors presented to faculty members included Ann Johnson, professor in the School of Nursing, Paul A. Reid Distinguished Service Award for Faculty; Alvin Malesky, associate professor and department head in the Department of Psychology, University Scholar Award; Burton Ogle, professor in the School of Health Sciences, Excellence in Teaching Liberal Studies Award; Chip Ferguson, associate professor and associate dean in the Kimmel School of Construction Management and Technology, Innovative Scholarship Award; and Todd Collins, associate professor and director of the Public Policy Institute in the Department of Political Science and Public A􀀲􃉡airs, Excellence in Community Engagement Award. Other honors went to Windy Gordon, associate professor in the Department of Psychology, who was chosen by students to deliver the 2016 Last Lecture, and the Parks and Recreation Management Program, winner of the Academic Program of Excellence Award. Chosen to participate in the Scholarly Development Assignment Program are Annette Debo, Axelle Faughn, David Henderson, John Williams, Mary Adams and Niall Michelsen. Chancellor’s Distinguished Teaching Award WCU Provost Alison Morrison-Shetlar presented the Chancellor’s Distinguished Teaching Award to Sudhir Kaul and said his teaching philosophy emphasizes the “open-ended and iterative nature of engineering problem solving” and that it consistently connects the theoretical and practical. “He recognizes that, in his course, students begin to see the concepts from their earlier learning come together, and he sees his position as that of a guide, helping students to apply the math and physics they have already learned to practical systems. The committee was impressed with Dr. Kaul’s obvious love of teaching and delight in pursuing teaching excellence,” Morrison-Shetlar said. University Scholar Award Alvin Malesky, recipient of the University Scholar Award, has conducted research on the e􀀲􃉥ectiveness of sex o􀀲􃉥ender registry websites, the use of social networking websites and integrity violations in online classes, Morrison-Shetlar said as she presented the honor. “The research in online class integrity has numerous implications for how faculty could or should develop courses as we develop online pedagogies to complement, and in some cases replace, classroom, laboratory and outdoor teaching methods,” she said. CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond the Glass Matrix 5/29/2017 Water Portraits: Barbara Tyroler 6/9/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' 6/10/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT Excellence in Teaching Liberal Studies Award Morrison-Shetlar presented the Excellence in Teaching Liberal Studies Award to Burton Ogle. “Dr. Burt Ogle de􀁅􄕮nes excellence as a teacher of liberal studies,” she said. “A deep commitment to students and a visible enthusiasm for environmental health serves to open minds and expand worldviews that prepare students for life at the university and change their lives. At a university full of great teachers, Burt Ogle is one of the best,” Morrison-Shetlar said. Innovative Scholarship Award As she presented the Innovative Scholarship Award to Chip Ferguson, Morrison- Shetlar spoke about a program designed by Ferguson that brings about multiple bene􀁅􄕴ts for science, technology, engineering and math (also known as STEM) students and programs. The program, titled Scholarship Program Initiative via Recruitment, Innovation and Transformation (also known as SPIRIT), “has produced signi􀁅􄕣cant scholarship” and “demonstrates Dr. Chip Ferguson’s commitment to improving students’ learning experiences through innovative scholarship,” she said. Excellence in Community Engagement Award The Excellence in Community Engagement Award was presented to Todd Collins. Morrison-Shetlar related to the audience that Collins was recently named WCU’s Steed Distinguished Professor in Public Policy, a position that is focused on expanding engagement with local governments and nonpro􀁅􄕴ts in the area. “This explicitly aligns with Todd’s perspective on community engagement,” she said. Collins “has clearly and publicly demonstrated a sustained, distinguished and superb commitment to university public service and outreach,” Morrison-Shetlar said. Last Lecture Award The Last Lecture Award is the only teaching award at WCU in which the recipient is selected solely by students, Morrison-Shetlar said as she presented the award to Windy Gordon. “Students use superlatives such as inspiring, passionate and fantastic to describe him and his classes,” she said. “Dr. Gordon’s students provided example after example of his interaction with students that made them want to stay in school. One stated, ‘Dr. Gordon is the reason I am still attending classes. He made me believe in myself.’” Paul A. Reid Distinguished Service Award for Faculty Morrison-Shetlar presented the Reid Service Award for Faculty to Ann Johnson. Speaking about Johnson’s 30 years in the WCU nursing program, Morrison-Shetlar said she “has often worn multiple hats, jumping in to serve as acting head or interim dean for colleges outside of nursing. “She exempli􀁅􄕥es Western’s commitment to education and sharing knowledge by leading and presenting programs on both a regional and national level,” Morrison-Shetlar said. “She has lent her talents to many outside institutions, helping to develop and improve health care outcomes for students and our communities.” Academic Program of Excellence Award Maurice Phipps, professor in the Parks and Recreation Management Program, accepted the Academic Program of Excellence Award from Morrison-Shetlar on behalf of the program’s students and faculty. The parks and recreation faculty prepare leaders for the recreation resource and outdoor education professions by promoting resourcefulness, independent thinking, the ability to cope with change and service to society, and “student experiential education is a foundational aspect of the program,” she said. Paul A. Reid Distinguished Service Award for Administrative Staff Jane Adams-Dunford received the Reid Service Award for Administrative Sta􀀲􃈮. In presenting the honor, Mike Byers, vice chancellor for administration and 􀁅􄕮nance, said Adams-Dunford has been described by her peers as someone who has “an innate need to help others through actions and deeds without looking for something in return.” “An accomplished, award-winning leader, Jane has worked tirelessly in support of campus diversity, student engagement and recognizing that all students need a voice,” Byers said. “She developed retention programs for academically challenged students; provided academic, career, personal and peer-to-peer counseling; provided cultural awareness programs for the campus and community; and developed disability awareness training.” Star Staff Award Dawn Brown was announced as recipient of the Star Sta􀀲􃈠 Award. Byers said Brown is a model leader and supportive mentor who works just as hard as her team in IT. “Dawn is committed to a work environment not built around job descriptions, but one focused on serving the faculty, sta􀀲􃈠 and students of WCU, because that’s where her heart is,” he said. “Dawn is a wealth of knowledge and has a super positive infectious attitude,” Byers said. “She encourages her team to be the best they can be in all situations, adding humor, toys and hats to rally the team when the queue lights up, a system goes down or whenever they just need a reminder that ‘we’re all in this together.’” Bright Idea Staff Award Anne Lane of the Mountain Heritage Center sta􀀲􃈠 has been working at WCU for only a little over two years, “but fortunately, she brought her inventive side with her to Western,” Byers said. Lane was charged with coming up with a safe and accessible storage system for the museum’s collections, and with the help of the university architect, she developed a system utilizing industrial shelving and rolling baker’s racks that are “working like a charm” and that were much less expensive than conventional museum storage systems, he said. Judy H. Dowell Outstanding Support Staff Award Byers said Irene Welch, recipient of the Judy H. Dowell Outstanding Support Sta􀀲􃉁 Award, “has been part of the WCU family for almost 28 years.” The individual who nominated Welch for the award, which is given to a non-exempt SHRA employee for outstanding service, said she is “always willing to help, give advice or just listen if you need an ear,” he said. Continuing to relate the nominator’s comments, Byers said, “Irene has helped many, many employees feel at ease because she’s such a kind and generous person. She is dependable, loyal to the university’s mission and goals, and provides the best customer service you will ever find.” Scholarly Development Assignment Program Recipients and their projects: Annette Debo, professor in the Department of English, a monograph titled “The Necessary Past: The Historical Poem in Contemporary African- American Poetry.” Axelle Faughn, associate professor in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, research on the role of professional development in the transfer of resources from teachers’ collectives into the mathematics classroom, and research on a “Mathematic Sel􀁅􄕥es” study on student-produced representations of visual mathematics concepts through photography. David Henderson, associate professor in the Department of Philosophy and Religion, a book titled “Tending the Wilderness: Natural Science and the Love of Nature.” John Williams, professor in the Department of Anthropology and Sociology, a co-authored monograph: “The Arvilla Complex Revisited. (The complex is a late Woodland burial mound on the northeastern plains of North Dakota.) Mary Adams, associate professor in the Department of English, writing two chapters and an introduction to a volume on Shakespeare and chiasmus, a way of mirroring sentence structure and sounds. Niall Michelsen, associate professor in the Department of Political Science and Public A􀀲􃉡airs, research on the interplay of domestic and international forces as they pertain to democracy and democratic governance, and research on international summit agendas of the G-family (G7, G8 and G20) members. OTHER UNIVERSITY HONORS Office of the Provost Professional development grant recipients are Risto Atanasov, Marsha Lee Baker, Melissa Birkhofer, Paromita Biswas, David Brown, Lyn Burkett, Brian Byrd, Kristen Calvert, Andrew Carnes, Emily Darnell, Annette Debo, Andrew Denson, Pamela Duncan, Mimi Fenton, Brian Gastle, Jay Gerlach, Yue Cai, Adriel Hilton, Beth Huber, Brent Kinser, Marco Lam, Diane Martinez, Jon Marvel, James McLachlan, Rain Newcomb, April Perry, Carrie Rogers, Honor Sachs, Krista Schmidt, Michelle Sorensen, Robert Steffen, Peter Tay, Paul Worley and Jayne Zanglein. College of Arts and Sciences Board of Governors College of Arts and Sciences Teaching Award – John Whitmire College of Business Board of Governors Creative and Innovative Teaching Award – Julie Johnson-Busbin Professor of Excellence – Mary Beth DeConinck College of Education and Allied Professions Board of Governors Award for Superior Teaching – Russ Binkley Botner Superior Teaching Award – Kia Asberg Dean’s Research Award – Tom Ford Exemplary Service Award – Jenny Stewart Soaring High Award – Melinda Cooper College of Fine and Performing Arts Board of Governors College of Fine and Performing Arts Teaching Award – Ian Jeffress Faculty Scholarship Award – Heather Mae Erickson Robert Kehrberg Service Award – Heather Mae Erickson Graduate School and Research Faculty Research and Creative Activities Award – Robert Clines, Chris Cooper, Bora Karayaka, Mary Anna LaFratta and Honor Sachs College of Health and Human Sciences Board of Governors Innovative Teaching Award – Carol MacKusick and David Wells Faculty Leadership Award – Sharon Metcalfe Faculty Scholar Award – Sharon Metcalfe Faculty Service Award – Brian Byrd Faculty-Student Engagement Award – Amy Murphy-Nugen Inter-professional Education Award – Colleen Hayes Health and Wellness Award – Kae Livsey Hunter Library Hunter Scholar Award – Mimi Fenton Kimmel School of Construction Management and Technology Board of Governors Distinguished Teaching Award – Sung Joon Suk Distinguished Research and Scholarly Engagement Award – Paul Yanik Distinguished Student Engagement Award – Robert Adams Excellence in Mentoring and Advising Award – Sean June Outstanding Early-Career Faculty Award – Omidreza Shoghli The George Reeser Outstanding Faculty Award – Wes Stone EMPLOYEE MILESTONES Ten Years of Service Vittal Anantatmula, Arledge Armenaki, Scott Barlowe, Lauren Bishop, Linda Carmody, Diana Catley, Peg Connolly, Mary Beth DeConinck, Anna Fariello, Susan Fouts, Brad Glenn, Elizabeth He􀀲􃉥el􀁅􄕮nger, Glenda Hensley, Sunny Himes, Mary Anne Hollis, Steven Honbarger, Carmen Hu􀀲􃉭man, Scott Hu􀀲􃉭man, Tom Johnson, Tony Johnson, Cheryl Johnston, Kelly Kelley, Brent Kinser, James Kirkpatrick, William Kreahling, Je􀀲􃉲rey Lawson, Karen Mason, Sharon Metcalfe, Kellie Monteith, Bill Richmond, Phyllis Robertson, Judy Robinson, Baldwin Sanders, Michelle Scifers, Benjamin Tanner, Erin Tapley, Blair Tormey, Lori Unruh, Melissa Wargo, Barbara Jo White, John Whitmire, Steve Wohlrab, Laura Wright, Paul Yanik and Jayne Zanglein. Fifteen Years of Service Melissa Allen, Kay Benson, Jason Brady, Patricia Bricker, Heidi Buchanan, Donald Carringer, Brian Chamberlin, Misty Colton, Annette Debo, Brian Dinkelmeyer, Jane Eastman, Matt Henley, Kimberly Jamison, Thomas Martin, William Martin, Thelma Mathis, Patricia McGraw, Niall Michelsen, Peter Nieckarz, Sean O’Connell, Linda Painter, David Steinbicker, Lisa Surber, George Sutton, Vicki Szabo, Jed Tate, Denise Wilfong, Rachel Wike and Lisa Wilson. Mike Byers, Marissa Ray and Marilyn Chamberlin were present and honored as 20-year employees. Twenty Years of Service Mary Adams, David Burress, Mike Byers, Janet Cabe, Aaron Carter, Marilyn Chamberlin, Wiley Danner, Keith Dills, Donna Jones, Matt Liddle, Mark Murphy, Marissa Ray and Valerie Schwiebert. Between the provost and the chancellor, Dawn Coward and William Frady were recognized for 25 years of service. Twenty-Five Years of Service Je􀀲􃈠 Bewsey, Pamela Buchanan, James Busbin, Jerry Cagle, David Cowan, Dawne Coward, William Frady, John Freeman, Glenda Gainor, Maxine Massingale, Sue McPherson, John Surber, Thomas Walawender, Donna Watson, Margaret Watson, Cindy Williams and Karen Woody. Thirty-year honorees present were (front row, left to right) Tammy Haskett, Phil Cauley, Mario Gaetano, Gregory Plemmons, Renee Corbin; (back row, left to right, 􀁍􄵡anked by the provost and the chancellor) Andy Degrove, Debbie Justice, Carolyn Wiggins, Timothy Carstens, Gwen Nicholson, Dale Carpenter and Pam Degraffenreid. Thirty-Plus Years of Service Aaron Ball, Roseanna Belt, Linda Bowers, Dale Carpenter, Timothy Carstens, Phil Cauley, John Clark, Bill Clarke, Renee Corbin, Je􀀲􃈠 Davis, Pamela DeGra􀀲􃉥enreid, Andy Degrove, George Frizzell, Sheila Frizzell, Burton Fox, Sherry Fox, Mario Gaetano, Je􀀲􃈠 Hagberg, Tammy Haskett, Bruce Henderson, Anthony Hickey, Yvonne Hooper, Jack Hoyle, Jon Jicha, Ann Johnson, Debbie Justice, Rebecca Lindsay, Don Livingston, Carla Luker, Steve McClure, Gwen Nicholson, Sharon Painter, Gregory Plemmons, Dona Potts, David Shapiro, Kay Turpin, Terry Welch, John West, Michael Wheatley, Carolyn Wiggins and Ronald Wiggins. Retiring Faculty and Staff Margaret Ashe, Candace Benson, Josie Bewsey, Donna Carpenter, Timothy Carstens, Steve Christison, Peggy Cope, Kimsey Corzine, R.B. Danner, Stephen English, Victoria Faircloth, Terry Curtis Fox, William Gates, Mac Gossett, Rosie Greenwood, Sandra Grunwell, Mary Jean Herzog, Lisa Hoyle, Luther Jones, Robert Kehrberg, Phillip Kneller, Steve McClure, Anna McFadden, Bill Moore, Jenny Owen, Ernie Plemmons, Eleanor Prochaska, Mike Razdrh, Anne Rogers, Barbara Schade, Peg Shafer, Alan Sellars, Laura Sellers, Cynthia Soderstrom, Ronnie Stillwell, Deborah Tarmann, Mary Teslow, Chris Tuten, Vicky Wade and Tommy Westbrook. Faculty Entering Phased Retirement, 2015-16 Casey Hurley, Kathy Starr and Jayne Zanglein. Information compiled by Randall Holcombe Tags: Faculty, Provost Alison Morrison-Shetlar, Staff © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 6, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | The interdisciplinary project “Assessing the Distribution and Variability of Marine Mammals through Archaeology, Ancient DNA and History in the North Atlantic” uses the resources of history, ancient DNA analysis, archaeology, literary studies, biology and folklore to reconstruct medieval Norse uses of marine mammals over a 1,000-year span. WCU faculty members Vicki Szabo (left) and Kelly Grisedale (right) watch as senior Hannah Van Hooser (center) examines a whale bone. TOP STORIES History professor leads project to study how ancient Norsemen used marine mammals With her research interests centering on Vikings, the medieval North Atlantic, marine mammal exploitation and environmental history, Western Carolina University Department of History associate professor Vicki Szabo is familiar with the early travels of Norwegians who ventured out to Scotland, Iceland, Greenland and eventually North America from around 800 to 1500. And while it’s clear how the Norwegians changed the lands they settled in, one area is not so easily understood. Norwegians used whales, seals and walruses, but there is very little information on how they used those mammals, and how often. It’s a story Szabo and about 15 other researchers from seven countries have set out to uncover. Szabo is the principle investigator for a project titled “Assessing the Distribution and Variability of Marine Mammals through Archaeology, Ancient DNA, and History in the North Atlantic.” The three-year project is being funded through a grant from the National Science Foundation for $473,183. It runs through November 30, 2018. During the period researchers are examining, there were massive climate 􀀾􃹵uctuations, from the medieval warm period that allowed the Vikings and Norwegians to travel across the North Atlantic, to the Little Ice Age around 1300, which was a cold period. “What we want to do in our project is see how they are using all of these marine mammals, which were trade commodities, but also, rather often, starvation foods,” Szabo said. “How are they using these marine mammals throughout this really interesting climate change period? We’re looking at Iceland, Scotland, Greenland and maybe North America to try and track patterns of marine mammal use. It’s an exciting story to tell. We really want it to be accessible to the school kids, the public, our students and our colleagues.” The grant allowed Szabo to hire a student assistant, senior Hannah Van Hooser, a history major from Demorest, Georgia. Van Hooser has completed an archaeological survey and is currently working on a historical project. “I’m kind of a history nerd,” Van Hooser joked. “I’ve always liked medieval history. I like learning about other cultures and their history. I’m currently working on an Icelandic law book and the history of Greenland.” The project is a collaboration of historians, archaeologists, biologists, literary scholars and DNA specialists. Among the DNA experts assisting will be Kelly Grisedale, assistant professor and interim director of WCU’s Forensic Science Program. Originally, the project was going to use a laboratory in Sweden for its forensic research. When that fell through, Grisedale offered the use of her lab. Grisedale said the most challenging part is working with potentially 1000-year-old samples of whale and seal bones and walrus ivory buried or left exposed to various environmental conditions. “The DNA is very degraded and broken down,” she said. “It’s only in tiny fragments.” “We have great lab facilities in the Forensic Science Program,” Grisedale said. “My role, in conjunction with other labs, is to take some of these old burned samples that can’t really be identi􀁃􄍥ed just by looking at them, and doing DNA analysis to determine what species these are, particularly what species of seal or whale or walrus.” Szabo said most of the bones they will be studying already have been found, although some are still being excavated. In the 􀁃􄍮nal year of the project, researchers may go to Greenland and collect bones that have just come out of the permafrost and sample those on the spot, extracting DNA as quickly as possible. Glaciers are melting so quickly, archaeological material is being lost, she added. “We want to tie this into biology,” Szabo said. “We want to tie this into reconstruction of past animal populations. We want to understand these Norse people better because right now, we only understand how they used the land. We don’t understand how they used the sea. These are longstanding questions in Norse history and archeology. CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT “I’m excited that Western is the home for a project like this, but we are also partnering with Duke University’s marine lab, the University of Iceland, the National Museums of Scotland and many other partners where students may be able to conduct research. I think the really cool thing about this project is giving students the opportunity to participate in this pretty cutting-edge project.” Szabo said students from the participating institutions will have the opportunity to go to di􀁇􄝥erent locations where research is being done, such as doing lab work in Nova Scotia or going to Iceland to work on archeology. “Part of the project is to show students how projects like this require interdisciplinary collaboration,” Szabo said. In June, Szabo will go to Iceland, which is the heart of the project, and then perhaps Nova Scotia next year. One of the goals of the project is to create a short course to prepare students to go abroad and be able to work independently. Szabo said Van Hooser has been her test case. “She had never really studied the Norse, so I started her o􀁇􄜠 with some books and some readings to get the big picture,” Szabo said. “She has familiarized herself with archaeology. Now, she’s doing some of the history. Hopefully, by the end of this student assistantship, Hannah’s going to be sort of the model of what we do with other students. When she goes off to graduate school, she’s going to have this really unique interdisciplinary skill set.” For more information on the project, contact Szabo at 828-227-3911. By Marlon W. Morgan Tags: Forensic Science, Kelly Grisedale, Vicki Szabo © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 6, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | Entries in the annual edible book contest do not have to resemble a book or its cover — as this 2013 entry does — but simply express some aspect of the book. NOTEWORTHY NEWS Hunter Library books National Library Week events, April 10-16 “Eat this book” may sound like a biblical instruction, but it is also at the heart of one of the activities during Hunter Library’s annual celebration of National Library Week, April 10-16. The edible book contest returns to this year’s observance, among other popular activities – including the display of some of library patrons’ favorite books and a monthlong food drive. On Monday, April 11, two card-making classes will be o􀀲􃉥ered, one from 2 to 4 p.m. and the second from 4 to 6 p.m. in Hunter Library Room 157B. The classes will be limited to 10 participants each, and interested individuals must sign up at the circulation desk in advance. No sign-up is required for “Coloring at the Library,” a stress-reducing activity o􀀲􃉥ered in the same room, 157B, from noon until 5 p.m. Wednesday, April 13. Entries in the edible book contest are not required to resemble books or their covers (though some in the past have done so), but only express some aspect of the book represented, said Elizabeth Marcus, undergraduate experience librarian. The entries are due by 10 a.m. Thursday, April 14, at the library’s main entrance. Voting will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., when sampling will take place, followed by the announcement of a winner at 2:30 p.m. Hunter Library’s food drive, held during April as an extension of National Library Week, bene􀀾􃹴ts individuals and families in the local community. Participants are asked to bring food items not packaged in glass jars, but with a long shelf life. Examples given include canned vegetables, soups, juices, sauces, mixes, rice, pasta, beans, peanut butter, oatmeal and cereal. Boxes for donations will be located near the library’s circulation desk. At any open-hours time during the week, patrons are invited to make a book ornament for the library’s “book tree,” or communicate how the library has transformed them (or their studies). First observed in 1958, National Library Week is sponsored by the American Library Association to promote the use of all types of libraries – public, school and university. A nonpro􀀾􃹴t citizens group, the National Book Committee, organized the 􀀾􃹲rst observance, hoping to encourage Americans to read more books. All of Hunter Library’s events are open to the public. Visit the circulation desk or call 227-7485 for more information. Tags: Hunter Library CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond the Glass Matrix 5/29/2017 Water Portraits: Barbara Tyroler 6/9/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' 6/10/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 20, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | NOTEWORTHY NEWS Hunter Library open 24/5 last two weeks of spring semester Western Carolina University students who need a quiet place to study for 􀀬􂱮nal exams will 􀀬􂱮nd Hunter Library open on a 24-hour weekday schedule starting at noon Sunday, April 24. The library will be open continuously from then until 10 p.m. Friday, April 29. Library hours for Saturday, April 30, will be 9 a.m. until 9 p.m. The library will re-open at 9 a.m. on Sunday, May 1, and remain open until 6 p.m. on Friday, May 6. “Free co􀀵􃕥ee and other hot beverages will be available every night starting around midnight while the library is operating on the 24-hour schedule,” said Elizabeth Marcus, undergraduate experience librarian. “Students looking for a truly quiet place to concentrate and study should check out the Silent Corner of Hunter Library’s ground floor,” she added. WCU Parking and Transportation Services will extend the Cat-Tran shuttle service from Hunter Library beyond its regular 2:30 a.m. end time to 7:30 a.m. while the library is on its 24-hour schedule. Final exams will be Saturday, April 30, through Friday, May 6. For more information about extended hours and services, see the library’s blog page at http://hunterlibrarynews.blogspot.com/ 2016/04/245-library-hours-for-final-exams.html. Tags: Hunter Library CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 27, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | NOTEWORTHY NEWS Inclusion, difficult conversations subject of upcoming workshops for faculty, staff As part of Western Carolina University’s ongoing e􀀪􂩯orts toward improving the campus climate on the issues of race, diversity and inclusion, the Coulter Faculty Commons and O􀀭􂵣ce of Intercultural A􀀪􂩡airs will host a series of activities leading into the fall semester that are designed to equip faculty and staff with skills to help them tackle the often-tricky subjects. The “Inclusion and Di􀀭􂵣cult Conversations” series will begin Monday, May 2, with three discussion-based “snack and learn” sessions aimed at helping participants learn how to facilitate di􀀭􂵣cult conversations. The 90-minute workshops will examine topics of self-awareness, aiding the conversation and creating space. Sessions will be held from 3:30-5 p.m. Monday, May 2; noon-1:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 4; and 9:30-11 a.m. Thursday, May 5. All sessions will take place in the Catamount Room of A.K. Hinds University Center. Similar sessions will be scheduled the week before the opening of the fall semester, Aug. 15-19. The schedule of activities also includes a series of summer informational workshops on the subject “Viewpoints on Di􀀭􂵣cult Conversations.” The sessions, to be held in June and July, may be attended in person, online or via video archive. Sta􀀪􂨠 members from Intercultural Affairs will provide information about the o􀀭􂵣ce’s services and activities to incoming faculty members as part of new faculty orientation, set for Aug. 11-12. Intercultural A􀀪􂩡airs also will host a “Courageous Conversations” series throughout the fall semester, which is designed to help faculty members and students participate in meaningful classroom discussions on issues of race, diversity and inclusion. The upcoming activities are coming in the wake of anonymous postings on social media platforms and chalked messages on campus sidewalks in March. Some of the social media postings have contained language deemed racist, hurtful, o􀀪􂩥ensive and frightening to many members of the campus community. The university held a series of campus conversations about issues of race, diversity and civil discourse throughout the month of April. Among the suggestions that came out of those conversations was the need for additional faculty and sta􀀪􂨠 training on how to talk about those issues with other members of the campus community. For more information about the “Inclusion and Difficult Conversations” series, contact Coulter Faculty Commons at 828-227-7196. Tags: Coulter Faculty Commons, Intercultural Affairs CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 6, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | Students pause during the parade of flags at a previous year’s celebration of WCU’s International Festival. TOP STORIES International Festival to be held April 13 on University Center lawn Western Carolina University will celebrate the diverse cultures and traditions of its international student population during the university’s 37th annual International Festival on Wednesday, April 13. Hosted by WCU’s Office of International Programs and Services, the festival is designed to foster cultural awareness, appreciation and understanding of the world’s diversity through music, food, dance, arts and crafts. The event will begin at 11 a.m. on the lawn of A.K. Hinds University Center with a world flag parade. Brandon Schwab, associate provost for academic affairs, and Ling LeBeau, director of international programs and services, will welcome attendees at 11:15 a.m., and performances will begin at 11:30 a.m. with Whimzik providing Celtic, New Zealand and Scandinavian music. Other performances will be Japanese Bon Odori folk dance at noon, Sri Lankan and northern Indian music at 12:30 p.m., traditional Saudi dance at 1 p.m., and Latin dance by the Latino Appreciation Student Organization at 2 p.m. The festival also will offer about 25 internationally flavored booths staffed by food and craft vendors, campus organizations and international students. Aramark, the campus food service provider, will be giving out food samples, and other booth crews will distribute information about WCU’s Study Abroad and Intensive English programs. Activities will conclude at 2:30 p.m. The event is free and open to everyone. For more information, contact the Office of International Programs and Services at 828-227-7494. By Randall Holcombe Tags: Brandon Schwab, Intensive English, International Programs & Services, Ling LeBeau, Study Abroad CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 27, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | NOTEWORTHY NEWS Kimmel School will hold annual Capstone Symposium on April 29 Western Carolina University’s annual Kimmel School Capstone Symposium will be 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Friday, April 29, in the Center for Applied Technology building. The Capstone Symposium, which is free and open to the public, is the culminating experience for the engineering and technology industry-sponsored capstone projects. More than 20 capstone projects will be on display. Among the numerous regional North Carolina manufacturers that sponsored projects are BorgWagner, Advanced Superabrasives, Haywood Electrical Cooperative, GE Aviation, Optical Cable Corporation and the U.S. Army Special Operations at Fort Bragg. One such project focused on the design and integration of custom features into a powered wheelchair for a speci􀀷􃝣c physically challenged operator requiring assistive features for collision and obstacle avoidance, path and elevation changes such as a curb or step, and similar maneuvering assistance. “The applied projects are the hallmark of our project-based learning curriculum and allow our students to be a part of the economic development of the Western North Carolina region,” said Jeffrey Ray, dean of the Kimmel School of Construction Management and Technology. For more information, call the Kimmel School at 828-227-7368. Tags: Kimmel School CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond the Glass Matrix 5/29/2017 Water Portraits: Barbara Tyroler 6/9/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' 6/10/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 20, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | Virginia West makes an appearance — and an entrance — in “Kings, Queens and In-Betweens.” (Photo courtesy Five Sisters Productions) NOTEWORTHY NEWS ‘Kings, Queens’ film to close out spring’s ACE series at WCU The 􀀴􃑮nal presentation of the 2015-16 Arts and Cultural Events series at Western Carolina University will be the Southern Circuit series 􀀴􃑬lm “Kings, Queens & In-Betweens,” a documentary about gender identity, on the lawn of the A.K. Hinds University Center at 8 p.m. Tuesday, April 26. Through the personal stories of eight drag performers and their troupes in Columbus, Ohio, the 􀀴􃑬lm seeks to make a complex subject approachable for mainstream audiences, inviting viewers into a conversation about the distinct and important di􀀽􃵥erences between gender, sex and sexuality. “The topic is ever so pertinent to North Carolina right now,” said Francis Ann Ortiz-Pineda, assistant director for campus programs, referring to the recent passage of House Bill 2, dubbed “the bathroom bill.” The new law has stirred protest because of its provision requiring usage of gender-speci􀀴􃑣c bathrooms according to the gender on the user’s birth certificate. “The timing of all this is very coincidental since we’ve had this 􀀴􃑬lm booked since last May,” Ortiz-Pineda said. “As of now, I am curious to see what type of conversations this film will bring to the WCU community.” Sister 􀀴􃑬lmmakers Gabrielle Burton and Ursula Burton represent the family business – Five Sisters Productions – on the tour with their 􀀴􃑬lm. Ursula, an actress who has appeared on shows including “Silicon Valley” and “The O􀁄􄑣ce,” produced “The Happiest Day of His Life” – which won a Viewer’s Choice Award on MTV’s LOGO Channel. Gabrielle, who recently won the Ohio Arts Council’s Individual Excellence Award as a 􀀴􃑬lmmaker, is a regular speaker on topics such as gender expression and identity. The documentary screening is free and open to the public. Discussion on topic will take place after the 􀀴􃑬lm at 9:30 p.m. Light snacks and refreshments will be served. An alternate screening room in case of rain will be Illusions at the University Center. The Southern Circuit Tour of Independent Filmmakers is a program of South Arts. Southern Circuit screenings are funded in part by a grant from South Arts in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts. More information about the 􀀴􃑬lm can be found at http://www.kingsqueensinbetweens.com. For more information about the ACE series, visit ace.wcu.edu or contact Ortiz-Pineda, at 828-227-2612. Tags: ACE Series, Southern Circuit CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond the Glass Matrix 5/29/2017 Water Portraits: Barbara Tyroler 6/9/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' 6/10/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 6, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | ACHIEVEMENTS Kossick to serve on national association’s scholarship committee Mark A. Kossick, WCU professor of nursing and graduate anesthesia simulation education coordinator, accepted an invitation from the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists Foundation to serve on its 2016 Scholarship Review Committee. His responsibilities include critiquing submitted student essays and assisting in the selection of recipients for funded scholarships. Tags: Mark Kossick CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 27, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | David Wells leads a classroom discussion. WCU nursing students fill the role of both patient and nurse in the simulation lab. TOP STORIES Lab provides nursing students with realistic hospital experience Simulation is often used in nursing programs to give students an idea of what actual patient interactions are like in a hospital. It can come in various forms, such as human-patient simulations, the use of manikins, virtual simulations or role playing. Western Carolina University School of Nursing assistant professor David Wells has taken simulation to another level, his colleagues say. On the third 􀀯􂽯oor of WCU’s Health and Human Sciences Building, Wells has created a simulation lab known as “Simulamen Laboratorii Regional Hospital.” It is designed to resemble an actual hospital room in every way, Wells said. The lab was created by Wells last fall to allow students to become familiar with the experience of providing care in an acute setting, with students participating as both nurse and patient. Patient barcodes synchronize information with a computer system, bedside monitors and IV lines. “If it wouldn’t be in an actual hospital, I don’t want to use it,” Wells said. Video recordings are made of students working in the simulation lab. Second-semester students use the lab for basic scenarios, while third-semester students use more advanced, process-based situations. Wells earned his master’s degree in nursing at Gardner-Webb University, and his master’s project included an evaluation of the e􀀹􃥥ectiveness of simulation on skill integration. He still lists simulation effectiveness as one of his primary research interests. Wells recently gave a presentation about his simulation project at a Southeastern Nursing Sta􀀹􃥅 Education Symposium, and educators at that event reported being amazed by his creation. With fewer opportunities for nursing undergraduates to work in actual hospital settings because of legal liability, increased competition for clinical sites and the regional need for highly skilled nurses to provide care in areas with nursing shortages, WCU’s simulation lab is a critical training ground for students, Wells said. Wells said he was inspired to create the lab from his community college days of working with manikins, which are models of the human body. He remembers the lack of reality involved in that training. “You lose voice in􀀯􂽥exion and facial expression, and you don’t learn about the nuances,” Wells said. “Why simulate the human patient when you can have the real thing?” In areas where it was impossible to replicate exact circumstances, Wells adapted, such as using a synthetic arm equipped with rubber tubes that simulate veins for intravenous injections. Mock medications are stored, coded and accessed with a computer system similar to those used in hospital systems. When necessary, complex and interactive manikins that include arti􀀾􃹣cial intelligence are used as patients. The manikins are able to cry, talk and receive airway tubes. One model is even capable of simulating childbirth. In order for the simulation lab to stay relevant, Wells makes sure to incorporate current research 􀀾􃹮ndings into the lab. Wells said he aims to “keep pushing the boundaries of simulation and the immersion experience.” For more information, contact Wells at 828-654- 6522 or dkwells@wcu.edu. Much of the information in this story was compiled by WCU graduate assistant Joshua Taylor. CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT Video recordings are made of students working in the lab. © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 6, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | EVENTS Let’s Talk: Building an Inclusive Community – April 5, 7, 11, 12 “Let’s Talk: Building an Inclusive Community” … April 5 & 7, noon – 2 p.m., UC Multipurpose Room | April 11 & 12, 8 – 10 p.m., UC Dogwood Room CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond the Glass Matrix 5/29/2017 Water Portraits: Barbara Tyroler 6/9/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' 6/10/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 6, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | Participants in the Valley of the Lilies Half Marathon get off to a running start. NOTEWORTHY NEWS Local residents take top spots at Valley of the Lilies races Residents of Cullowhee and Sylva took the four top spots during the sixth annual Valley of the Lilies Half Marathon and 5-K held on campus Saturday, April 2. The winner of the half marathon was Ben Stephenson, 26, of Cullowhee, who recorded a time of 1:23:40 for the 13.1 miles. The top female half marathon finisher was Jennifer Black, 24, of Cullowhee, with a time of 1:40:13. There were a total of 127 finishers for the half marathon. The 5-K was won by Victor Jones, 18, of Cullowhee, with a time of 19:38 for the 3.1 miles. The women’s 5-K winner was Annalise Hicks, a 14-year-old from Sylva, with 23:39. A total of 148 runners and walkers completed the 5-K. More results can be seen by going to halfmarathon.wcu.edu (link no longer active) and clicking on “Results and Photos.” Race hosts were WCU’s School of Health Sciences and Department of Campus Recreation and Wellness. Proceeds will be used to assist WCU students with professional development, presentations and travel to conferences. The title sponsor for the races was the Ascent Partnership, an initiative involving WCU and Harris Regional Hospital and Swain Community Hospital. Tags: Valley of the Lilies CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 6, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | Lori Lewis TOP STORIES Lori Lewis appointed vice chancellor for development, alumni engagement Lori A. Lewis, an advancement executive with nearly 20 years of experience in development and alumni a􀀤􂑡airs in higher education, will join Western Carolina University later this spring to lead its fundraising efforts. Lewis, currently vice president for institutional advancement at McDaniel College in Westminster, Maryland, will assume the position of vice chancellor for development and alumni engagement at WCU effective June 6. She 􀀫􂭬lls a vacancy created by the departure of Jim Miller, former associate vice chancellor for development and alumni relations, who is now executive director of development for regional and major gifts programs in the Office of University Development at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Lewis is an accomplished and seasoned advancement professional with extensive experience leading fundraising campaigns at a variety of higher education institutions, from large universities to small liberal arts colleges, Chancellor David O. Belcher said in announcing her appointment. “Lori Lewis possesses exactly the skill set, the experience and the vision the university needs to take our development e􀀤􂑯orts to the next level,” Belcher said. “Lori will build upon the solid foundation already in place as we gear up for our upcoming comprehensive fundraising campaign and as we endeavor to increase the number of endowed scholarships to provide financial assistance to deserving students.” Lewis will function as the senior development and alumni engagement o􀀵􃕣cer at WCU. She will report directly to the chancellor and be a member of the chancellor’s Executive Council. Her primary responsibilities will be to design and implement strategies for development and alumni engagement initiatives at the university and college levels; build and lead the sta􀀤􂑳s and volunteers needed to support the university’s fundraising activities; and support the chancellor and other key internal and volunteer leaders in their work with top donors and donor prospects. “I see my role as vice chancellor for development and alumni engagement as twofold: advise campus leadership on all aspects of development and alumni affairs and effectively promote internal and external support of the university’s mission as correlated with giving and engagement goals,” she said. Lewis will oversee annual giving, major giving, planned giving, prospect research, donor relations, advancement services and alumni engagement. She also will work closely with the Catamount Club and others in the athletics offices on fundraising efforts in support of the intercollegiate athletics program. Vice president at McDaniel College since 2012, Lewis has led the college’s philanthropy and engagement programs, including annual giving, major gifts, gift planning, advancement engagement, alumni relations and advancement services. Under her leadership, McDaniel annually exceeded all fundraising goals over the last three 􀀫􂭳scal years, increasing the baseline of philanthropic support by 36 percent. During the same period, the college grew its number of alumni donors by 17 percent. Prior to her work at McDaniel, Lewis was vice president for advancement of Marietta College in Ohio from 2005 until 2012, where she developed and oversaw a successful three-year, $50 million comprehensive campaign. Lewis was assistant dean and director of development at Virginia Tech’s College of Engineering from 2004 until 2005 and was director of development there from 2002 until 2004. She worked at Ohio University in development roles from 1997 until 2002, 􀀫􂭲rst as assistant dean of development and alumni a􀀤􂑡airs in the College of Health and Human Services and then as assistant dean for development for that university’s Russ College of Engineering and Technology. She holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in special education, both from Ohio University. Prior to her fundraising career, Lewis was a special education teacher, administrator and adjunct faculty member at Ohio University’s College of Education. By Bill Studenc Tags: Advancement, Lori Lewis CATEGORIES | THE REPORTER TOP STORIES NOTEWORTHY NEWS ACHIEVEMENTS EVENTS PHOTOS | WCU NEWS SERVICES CALENDAR 5/29/2017 Ancient Forms, Modern Minds 5/29/2017 Print Plus One: Beyond the Glass Matrix 5/29/2017 Water Portraits: Barbara Tyroler 6/9/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' 6/10/2017 Musical Variety Show 'Livin' the Dream' LINKS Calendar Higher Education NewsWatch WCU Hub AFRICA! MORE THAN A CONTINENT © 2016 Western Carolina University. SEARCH Search Home About Archives Subscribe Contact WCU Home April 20, 2016 􀀀􀀠 Email This Post 􀀀􀀠 Print This Post 􀀀􀁓 Share | Mike Super will perform at WCU on May 1. NOTEWORTHY NEWS Magician Mike Super closes out WCU series May 1 at Bardo Arts Center Magician Mike Super, winner of NBC’s TV series “Phenomenon,” will perform at Western Carolina University’s John W. Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center on Sunday, May 1, at 3 p.m. It will be the 􀀲􃉮nal performance in this year’s Galaxy of Stars Series. Super uses a down-to-earth form of magic that enables him to connect with the audience on a level they can relate to, TV critics say. His performance on “Phenomenon” made him the 􀀲􃉲rst and only magician to win a live magic competition on primetime U.S. network television. Super is the recipient of numerous accolades, including Performing Arts Artist of the Year

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Journeys Through Jackson 2016 Vol.26 No.01
Jackson County Genealogical Society (N.C.)
Academic Journal Academic Journal | 01/01/2016 Please log in to see more details
Journeys Through Jackson is the official journal of the Jackson County Genealogical So... more
Journeys Through Jackson 2016 Vol.26 No.01
01/01/2016
Journeys Through Jackson is the official journal of the Jackson County Genealogical Society, Inc. The journal began as a monthly publication in July 1991, was published bimonthly from 1994 to 2003, and continues today as a quarterly publication. The journal issues in this digital collection are presented as annual compilations. ; Journeys Through Jackson The Official Journal of the Jackson County Genealogical Society, Inc. Vol. XXVI, No. I Winter 2016 JACKSON COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY, INC. 2016 Officers President . Timothy Osment Vice Presidents . Lynn Hotaling, Jason Gregory Secretary . Mary Buchanan Smith Treasurer . Teresa Deitz Manring Librarian. Marie Clark Office Manager . Karen Nicholson Web Master . Deanne G. Roles Computer Technician . Jason N. Gregory Chair, Publications (Editor) . Sanji Talley Watson Journeys Through Jackson is the official publication of the Jackson County Genealogical Society. Members and non-members are invited to submit genealogical materials for publication, with the understanding that the editor reserves the right to edit these materials for genealogical content, clarity, or taste. The Society assumes no responsibility for errors of fact that may be contained in submissions, and except where noted, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor or of the Jackson County Genealogical Society. The Society accepts no advertising for this publication except for notices from other non-profit groups. From the Editor Things at the Society are getting exciting. We are now in our 25th year, and that is a major achievement for us. We have several things planned for the upcoming year, and I hope that you will join us in celebrating our anniversary. I wasn’t one of the first members, but when I found out that we had one, I had to join. I can honestly say that it was one of the best decisions I have ever made. I have learned many things from the people that I have met throughout the years. And consider myself lucky and blessed to have met them all. It is my hope and prayer that our Society continues to grow and expand. For members and friends who have Facebook, we have a Facebook page, Jackson County Genealogical Society. Be sure to check it out and post messages and pictures. This is a great resource to expand our Society and to connect with people who have ties to Jackson County. REMEMBER DUES FOR 2016 ARE DUE AT THE FIRST OF THE YEAR! Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 1 Table of Contents Table of Contents .1 JCGS Photo Album. 2-6 25 Years and Counting . 7-11 Bringing Them Back .12 1880 Census Records – Jackson County . 13-16 Descendants of Archer Blanton . 17-20 1939 Jackson County Death Certificates . 21-23 William Holland Thomas Store Ledgers .24 Descendants of John Montgomery Beck . 25-28 A Little Extra.28 Doctor’s Daily Journal . 29-32 Descendants of John Thomas Tatham . 33-36 William J. “Billy” Parker . 37-42 Oldie, But Goodie .42 First Year Articles. 43-45 Index . 47-48 The address for JCGS is now: Jackson County Genealogical Society Post Office Box 480 Sylva, NC 28779 Stay in touch with us! Please make sure we have your correct contact information: Address; phone number; e-mail address and families of interest. We are in the process of updating everyone’s contact information. Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 2 JCGS Photo Album These two pictures are some of the many that the JCGS has in its holdings. We are not sure who the people are, but we have figured out that it was a baptizing being held at the curve of Caney Fork Creek, near the of Blackrock Timber Company in the Caney Fork area. Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 3 JCGS Photo Album These three photographs are some of the many that the Society has that are unknown. If you have any idea of who these people are, please contact the society and let us know. Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 4 JCGS Photo Album The photograph above left is Robert Nathan Middleton and his wife Lucy Jane Watson. The picture above is of Herchell Parker and Howard Wood. The photograph to the left is of Earl Hooper and Norma Jean Woods Coggins. Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 5 JCGS Photo Album The above photograph is another one of our “unknowns,” but, the “painter” in the foreground is a sight not seen much here anymore. The picture below was given by Mary Smith Buchanan and is of Burnett Elbert Blanton. He was the Watkins Dealer in Jackson Co. and on the Cherokee Reservation in the 1940’s. His family came here from Horry Co., SC. His father owned the Rockledge Gas Station on Webster Road. Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 6 JCGS Photo Album Crossing the creek at Charley’s Creek is Ira L. Brown (9 Feb 1890 - 27 Oct 1968). Bill Crawford was impressed with the white faced mule. The picture below is of Ira’s brother, John Talford Brown (10 Jul 1887 - 10 Feb 1914.) They are both sons of Julius Manley Brown (26 Jan 1861 – 1 Sep 1928) and Chloe Jane Middleton (7 Dec 1858 – 28 Nov 1962). Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 7 25 Years and Counting As some of you may know, this year is the 25th Anniversary of the Jackson County Genealogical Society. From our humble beginnings, we have grown into one of the best Societies in the state of North Carolina. It is our plan all year long, to bring back information and memories from our first year. If any member, past or present, would like to share how the Society has benefited them or what it has meant to them, and you feel like sharing with everyone else, please send it to the Society and we will share it here with everyone. Just remember, our Society has grown over the years due to our members’ steadfast support of the group. With continued support, we can continue on into the future growing even stronger and better. Our Beginnings On March 14, 1991 at 7:00 p.m. at the Jackson County Public Library an organizational meeting was held. The 15 people present were all there to discuss beginning a Genealogical Society for Jackson County. All present voted that this kind of organization would benefit both people doing genealogical research and Jackson County. It was also decided that the organization would be involved with producing a Jackson County Family History book. Helen Vance, one of the organizers of the Swain County Genealogical and Historical Society, gave a presentation of what would be required to form a Society. She was very informative of the procedures and legal requirements needed. She also agreed to be an Advisor to the Society. Each person in attendance introduced themselves and shared what families of interest each of them have. Some of the names mentioned were: Jenkins, Overstreet, Davis, Dills, Parris, Clayton, Bumgarner, Frizzell, Ensley, Monteith, Crawford, Sherrill, Cowan, Bryson, Stephens, Hooper, Beck, Wilson, Cable, and Cockerham (Cochran). Temporary officers were elected, as follows: President: Ruth Shuler Vice-President: Nelma Bryson Secretary: Carolyn Johnson Treasurer: David Frizzell A Constitutional and Bylaws Committee was chaired by Larry Crawford, and an Editing Committee was chaired by Kirk Stephens. It was decided that membership to the Society will be open to any interested person. The next meeting was planned for April, 11, 1991 and would be held at the Jackson County Public Library at 7:00 p.m. Those in attendance that that first meeting were: Carolyn Deitz Johnson, Hattie H. Deitz, Roy Shuler, Jewell Overstreet, Helen Davis Cooper, Larry Crawford, Harry Bumgarner, David Frizzell, Rick Frizzell, Bill Crawford, Nelma Bryson, Kirk Stephens, Dorris D. Beck, Helen C. Vance, Ruth C. Shuler. Organizational Meeting On April 11, 1991, at the Jackson County Public Library, the Jackson County Genealogical Society completed the organization of the Society. The group adopted a constitution and bylaws; set the individual, family and life membership rates; heard details of the sponsorship of the Jackson County Heritage Book; and discussed publications and future activities of the organization. It was decided that membership to the Society would be open to anyone who is interested in genealogy, whether or not that person lives in Jackson County. The purpose of the organization are: 1. To bring together those people interested in genealogy, especially but not limited to Jackson County, North Carolina families; 2. To discover, research, and exchange material related to Jackson County genealogy; 3. To provide for the preservation of such material and for its accessibility, as far as may be feasible; 4. To publish this material at the frequency desired by the Society members. Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 8 It was especially emphasized that persons who do not live in Jackson County but who have roots and family connections here are most welcome to join the group. First President’s Message July 1991 Welcome to the premier issue of “Journeys Through Jackson,” the official publication of the Jackson County Genealogical Society, Inc. The name chosen for this publication is intended to reflect not only the geographical aspects of traveling through Jackson County but, also, the sense of traveling through the decades with ancestors long gone and descendants yet to come. From Sapphire to Soco, from Balsam to Bullpen, from Cowee to Cashiers, from Whiteside to Whittier, and all points in between, this newsletter will document the people and places of our Mountain Home, Jackson County. The first major project of the Society is the Publication of The Jackson County Heritage Book, with work now in progress to share and preserve the family lines of those persons who live in the county, who have ever lived in the county, who have roots in the county. Submissions of material for the Heritage Book are encouraged and solicited from members, and additional information may be obtained by writing to the Society at the address listed elsewhere in this newsletter. Material for “Journeys Through Jackson” will, until the Heritage Book is published, consist of primary source information from county records, family Bibles, cemetery and population census records, and interviews with elderly persons. Inquiries from members and non-members will be included. After the Heritage Book is completed, members and non-members may submit family data to be included in “Journeys Through Jackson.” The Society does reserve the right to accept, reject, and/or edit any submitted materials and disclaims any responsibility for errors in fact or opinion made by contributors. Membership in the Society is open to any person interested in genealogical research. The Society is incorporated, and application has been made for tax-exempt status. It is a distinct privilege to have been chosen as the founding president of the Jackson County Genealogical Society, and I pledge to you my best efforts to carry out the purposes and objectives of the group. Please let me know whenever I may be of assistance to you. Ruth Shuler First Issue Included in the first issue of “Journeys Through Jackson” was published in July 1991 and included the following information: 1. JCGS Interview with Mrs. Minnie Lee Harris Alexander. (Reprinted with update further in this issue.) 2. 1889 Obituaries and Death Notices 3. 1902 Voter Registration for Jackson County 4. Death Certificated for Jackson County Persons Born Prior to 1900 5. 1870 Census of Jackson County 6. Jackson County Marriage Register 1853-1873 7. Olivet Cemetery Census 8. Delayed Birth Certificates of Jackson County Persons Born Prior to 1900 9. Queries 10. Charter Membership Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 9 Founding Officers President Ruth Shuler Vice President Nelma Bryson Secretary Carolyn Johnson Treasurer David Frizzell Publications Chairman Kirk Stephens Heritage Book Committee Co-Chairman Larry Crawford, Rick Frizzell Vice Chairman David Frizzell Secretary Charles Shuler Treasurer Ruth Shuler Topical History Chairman Lloyd Cowan Family History Chairman Bill Crawford Charter Members Below is a list of all the Charter Members of JCGS with their families of interest. Adams, Trudy (Mrs. Robert A.) Coward, Norton, Rogers, Zachary, and collateral families of these Allison, Clyde Allison, Howell, Henry, Queen, Fowler, Bradley Barton, Elizabeth Crawford Parker, Owens, Crawford, Galloway Beck, Dorris D. and Sam Beck, Buchanan, Dills, Green, Sutton, Brooks Beck, Teresa K. Beck, Dills, Buchanan, Green Benson, Sue H. Leiter, Hooper Bradshaw, Eleanor Brown, Jean Crawford Briscoe, Brown, Crawford, Shelton Bryson, Nelma Buchanan, C. Henry Buchanan Bumgarner, Harry and Dollie Bumgarner, Peek, Ammons, Shuler, Henderson, Henry, Sellers, Crawford, Kitchens, Wright, Moses, Moore, Houston Cheney, Lorisa Shuler Cooper, Helen Davis Dills, Davis, Fisher, Wilson, Cooper, McClure Cowan, Anne and Frank A. C. Reynolds family; M. D. Cowan family; Jackson County; Sylva; Baptist Churches in Jackson County. Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 10 Cowan, Lloyd W. Cowan, Bradley, Hall, Buchanan Crawford, Archie and Ruth P. Crawford, Sutton, Pangle, Green Crawford, Larry Crawford, Parris, Blanton, Norman, Clayton, Hemphill, Ensley, Wilson, Cockerham (Cockran), Hinshaw Crawford, William Loranzo Crawford, Sherrill, Conner, Nichols, Beck, Frizzell, Buchanan, Bryson, Ensley, Morrow, Cowan, Allman Deitz, Daniel W. Deitz, Wilson, Beck, Frizzell Deitz, Hattie and Johnson Deitz, Harris, Honeycutt, Hunnicutt, Queen Dooley, Barbara W. Ahl, Bobo, Clark, Denton, Dooley, Elam, Gardner, Goodner, Imes, London, Patterson, Poston, Scherrer/Shearer, Swafford Edwards, Louise H. Hyatt, Shelton, Edwards, Rice, Winchester, Conley Frizzell, David and Sheila Frizzell, Ensley, Buchanan, Dean, Bryson, Carson, Henson, Deitz, Gribble, Black Frizzell, Rick, Freddie, and Carl Frizzell, Gribble, Buchanan, Ensley, Carson, Dean Gibson, David Gibson, Stiles, Dicks Creek section of Jackson County Gustafson, Virginia NC, GA, FL Hall, Walter and Roberta Hall Henderson, Traci Lee Dillard, Enloe, Buchanan, Ward, Holcombe, Green, Sutton, Bradburn Holcombe, Lucy Parris Hall, Clements, McEntire, Marr, Collins, Wilson, Hooper, Beck, Swearingem Hooper, E. Elmer and Irene M. Hooper, F. Lambert and Joy Hooper, Wike Hudson, Ann Hooper Hooper, Wilson, Green Hyatt, John and Frances Bryson, Conley, Hyatt, Shelton, Haskett, Blaine Jackson, Odessa E. Extine, Cannon, Rochester, Colville, Hanna, Kelly, Montieth, Ensley, Parker, Harrett, Smith Johnson, Carolyn Deitz Deitz, Harris, Buchanan, Johnson Johnson, Mildred Cabe Cable, Buchanan, Sharpe, Cabe, Jones, Johnson, Shirrell Jones, Claude and Anne Jones, Picklesimer, Monteith, Alley, Cathey, Campbell, Caler, Caldwell, Conley, Posey, Parris, Brooks, Collins, Owen(s), Allison, Bryson Kirkland, Verna Higdon, Wiggins, Kirkland Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 11 Lanning, Dora Mae McClure, Roy and Irene Bryson, Buchanan McClure, William Eugene McClure, Bryson, Allen, Queen, Corbin, Farmer, Ensley, Fisher, Hyatt, York, Parris, Gillon, Countryman, Cunningham Nardy, Jane and Millis, Liz Zachary, Wilson, Beasley, Lombard, Dillard, Fugate, Bryson Oxner, Jarvis and Elizabeth Patrick, Mary L. Patterson, Mary Cecil B. Bryson, Ensley, Dills, Henson Phillips, Rachel Proctor, Christine Cole Cole, Woody, Shook, Hoyle, Blanton, Proctor, Wilson, McClure, Parris, Gunter Ratcliffe, Sheila P. Fisher, Monteith, Pannell, Scotch-Irish migration to western North Carolina Reynolds, Frankie D. Dills, Reynolds, Brendle, Green Shelton, June Edwards Shook, Mary Rhinehart Hooper, Shook, Parker Shuler, Charles Robert Shuler, Beasley Shuler, Roy and Ruth Bailey, Barker, Cockerham, Mills, Pruett, Shuler, Upton Smith, Edna P. Parker Smith, Jo Ann (Mrs. H. A.) Smith, Higdon, Coward, Rich, Rogers, Justice, Wiegel or Wikle, Widmeir, Whitmire, Erfurt or Erfort, Hudson, Weaver, Russell, Berry, Fields, Hoffman or Huffman, Harris, Moser, Buchanan, Black, Nichols, Culbertson; Burke, Buncombe, Macon, Jackson, Haywood counties; NC; VA; PA; SC Stephens, Kirk Arrington, Arrowood, Blanton, Brooks, Cantrell, Coward, Eller, Hooper, Mills, Stephens; Caney Fork families Sutton, Joann H. Ashe, Watson, Henson, Sutton Vance, Helen Cable Cabe, Cable, Buchanan, Higdon, Jones, Tabor, DeHart, Ramsey, Sumpter Watson, Mitchell Watson Wiggins, Carolyn B. Bryson, Henson, Potts, Deitz, Stiles, Crawford, Ensley, Wiggins, Pannell Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 12 Bringing Them Back In years past, JTJ has published Pedigree Charts of members, or of families they are researching. This is a great tool to learn new information and to share information with other people. In this anniversary year, we would like to bring these charts back for publication. Feel free to send yours in for publication. (We will use the editors as an example.) Ancestors of Sanji Willene Talley Sanji Wi llene Talley b: June 26, 1965 in Sylva. Jackson County, North Carolina m: July 13, 1991 in Cedar Bapt ist Church, Tuckasegee, Jackson County, North Carolina Russel l Wayne Tal ley b: June 07, 1943 in Rabun County, Georgia m: June 09, 1964 in Wahalla, Occonee County, South Carolina d: December 10, 2008 in Republic of Panama Woodie Wi llene Shook b: July 14, 1942 in Jackson County, North Carolina d: October 03, 2004 in Tuckasegee, Jackson County, North Carolina Lyman Elmer Tal ley b: January 16, 1912 in Rabun County, Georgia m: August 30, 1936 in Rabun County, Gerogia d: February 10, 1993 in Jackson County, North Carolina Minnie Leora Carver b: June 28, 1914 in Rabun County, Georgia d: September 23, 2010 in Macon County, North Carolina Vernon Vess Shook b: March 23, 1907 in Jackson County, North Carolina m: December 29, 1930 in Jackson County, North Carolina d: November 01, 1979 in Spotsylvania County, Virginia Mary Rachel Brown b: November 01, 1912 in Jackson County, North Carolina d: December 08, 1972 in Jackson County, North Carolina Henry Harrison Tal ley b: November 19, 1888 in Rabun County, Georgia m: October 13, 1906 d: November 16, 1977 in Macon County, North Carolina Minnie Elizabeth Green b: August 23, 1884 in Macon County, North Carolina d: August 06, 1972 in Macon County, North Carolina John Roberson Carver b: July 22, 1874 m: November 15, 1896 d: February 11, 1944 Mary Elizabeth Burrell b: December 25, 1873 d: April 28, 1918 James Marion Shook b: May 31, 1885 in Jackson County, North Carolina m: February 27, 1906 in Jackson County, North Carolina d: September 28, 1962 in Jackson County, North Carolina Clercy Jane Hooper b: June 17, 1890 in Jackson County, North Carolina d: September 27, 1961 in Jackson County, North Carolina Ira Alonzo Brown b: July 20, 1886 in Jackson County, North Carolina m: January 14, 1912 in Tuckasegee, Jackson County, North Carolina d: July 10, 1973 in Jackson County, North Carolina Li l lie Mae Shook b: May 01, 1889 in Jackson County, North Carolina d: May 16, 1959 in Jackson County, North Carolina Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 13 1880 Jackson County Census Records ED: We continue in this issue the Scotts Creek Township. Abstracted in 2016 by Sanji Talley Watson. The enumerator had trouble keeping the numbers of the households and families in order, they are abstracted as written. 59-61 Mills, Engaline 38 W – House keeping NC NC TN Laura E. 11 W – Daughter NC NC NC 60-62 Jones, Reuben 69 W – Blacksmith NC NC NC Anna 73 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ 61-63 Blanton, Jeremiah 50 W – Farming NC NC NC Mary 39 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Marge M. 19 W – Daughter – At home “ “ “ Elis 17 W – Son – At home “ “ “ James 15 W – Son – At home “ “ “ Arty C. 2 W – Daughter “ “ “ 62-64 Fisher, William T. 46 W – Farming TN TN TN Nancy 33 W – Wife – House keeping NC TN NC Mary C. 11 W – Daughter – At home “ “ “ Susan 9 W – Daughter “ “ “ William L. 5 W – Son “ “ “ Margret J. 3 W – Daughter “ “ “ 63-65 Bryson, John S. 34 W – Farming NC NC NC Olif M. 27 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Sulivan B. 10 W – Son – At home “ “ “ Mary V. 8 W – Daughter “ “ “ Elbert 5 W – Son “ “ “ Philip T. 3 W – Son “ “ “ Sina 1 W – Daughter “ “ “ 64-66 Stuart, Synthia 43 W – House keeping NC NC NC James H. 19 W – Son – Tending Mill NC SC NC Mary J. 16 W – Daughter-in-law – At home NC NC NC 65-67 Sutton, Joseph M. 39 W – Farming NC NC NC Violet 30 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Mary 13 W – Daughter – At home “ “ “ Andrew J. 11 W – Son – At home “ “ “ Martha M. 9 W – Daughter “ “ “ Sarah T. 7 W – Daughter “ “ “ Robert R. 4 W – Son “ “ “ Alice A. 3/12 W – Daughter “ “ “ 66-68 Painter, Samuel 30 W – Farming NC NC NC Jane 28 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Emaline 10 W – Daughter – At school “ “ “ Bele 9 W – Daughter “ “ “ Alice 6 W – Daughter “ “ “ John S. 4 W – Daughter “ “ “ Violet 1 W – Daughter “ “ “ 67-69 Cook, Hance M. 74 W – Post Master NC NC NC Elender 70 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ 68-70 Cook, James T. 41 W – Farming NC NC NC Sarah E. 35 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Reed, Alice 19 W – Servant SC SC SC 69-71 Cook, Marcus 25 W – Farming NC NC NC Martha 21 W – Wife – House keeping SC SC NC Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 14 Samuel F. 5 W – Son NC NC SC George L. 3 W – Son “ “ “ Tolitha J. 7/12 W – Daughter “ “ “ Vinson, John 30 W – Tinner NJ NJ NJ 70-72 Clayton, John B. 24 W – Farming NC NC NC Mary L. 40 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ William T. 6 W – Son “ “ “ 71-73 Owens, James 38 W – Farming NC NC NC Easter M. 33 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Altha J. 14 W – Daughter – At home “ “ “ Rufus J. 12 W – Son – At home “ “ “ Christopher L. 10 W – Son – At home “ “ “ John W. 8 W -- Son “ “ “ Samantha E. 6 W – Daughter “ “ “ Alice J. 3 W – Daughter “ “ “ Sarah M. 1 W – Daughter “ “ “ 72-74 Crawford, George W. 24 W – Farming NC NC NC Nancy S. 27 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Olif C. 5 W – Daughter “ “ “ Lorenzo W. 4 W – Son “ “ “ Alice J. 2 W – Daughter “ “ “ Candas M. 2 W – Daughter “ “ “ Extine, Louise 17 W – Servant SC TN SC 73-75 Mills, Rubin S. 73 W – Farming NC NC NC Mele 55 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Thadeus B. 19 W – Son – At home “ “ “ 74-76 Mills, Syntha 73 W – House keeping NC NC NC Tillman 14 W – Step-son – At home “ “ “ William D. 12 W – Step-son – At home “ “ “ 75-77 Mills, William T. 37 W – Farming NC NC NC Martha A. 39 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Arty C. 16 W – Step-daughter – At home “ “ “ Sarah E. 14 W – Step-daughter – At home “ “ “ Elbert 7 W – Son “ “ “ Riley 4 W – Son “ “ “ Jefferson W. 2 W -- Son “ “ “ 76-78 Mills, Malinda 58 W – House keeping TN NC NC Rebeca 30 W – Daughter TN NC TN Sarah 19 W – Daughter – At home NC NC TN Ibba 14 W – Daughter – At home “ “ “ 77-79 Mills, Joseph H. 33 W – Farming NC NC TN Martha 35 W – Wife – House keeping NC NC NC Crawford, Mary C. 17 W – Step-daughter – At home “ “ “ 78-80 Wood, Samuel N. 32 W – Farming NC NC NC Liza M. 28 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Syntha E. 9 W – Daughter “ “ “ Wood, Thomas 87 W – Father “ “ “ Syntha 74 W – Mother “ “ “ 79-81 Johnson, Jefferson 53 B – Farming NC NC NC Joseph 15 B – Son – At home “ “ “ Eliza 14 B – Daughter – At home “ “ “ 80-82 Mills, James ? 82 W – Farming NC NC TN Richel 42 W – Wife – Keeping house NC NC NC Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 15 Columbus 9 W – Son “ “ “ Salona 7 W – Daughter “ “ “ Joseph 5 W – Son “ “ “ Marbela M. 2 W – Daughter “ “ “ 81-83 Love, Richard 28 B – Farming NC NC NC Caroline 23 B – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ 82-84 Norman, Louisa 66 W – House keeping NC NC NC Benjamin 29 W – Son – Works on farm “ “ “ Rebeca 23 W – Daughter – At home “ “ “ James 2 W – Grandson “ “ “ Mary M. 3/12 W – Granddaughter “ “ “ 83-85 Norman, James 33 W – Farming NC NC NC Sarah 31 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Sarah E. 8 W – Daughter “ “ “ Robert V. 6 W – Son “ “ “ Norman, Abraham 22 W – Brother – At home “ “ “ 84-86 Hall, Elbert 67 W – Farming NC NC NC Elizabeth 54 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ 85-87 Robinson, Dillard L. 24 W – Farming NC NC NC Mary M. 16 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Melvina 18 W – Sister – At home “ “ “ 86-88 Ensley, John 58 W – Farming NC NC NC Syntha 49 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Joseph 30 W – Son “ “ “ John B. 17 W – Son – At home “ “ “ Elis D. 15 W – Son – At home “ “ “ Sarah R. 12 W – Daughter – At home “ “ “ Emaline C. 10 W – Daughter – At home “ “ “ 87-89 Long, Mary A. 28 W – House keeping NC NC NC John R. 11 W – Son – At home “ “ “ Rhoda M. 9 W – Daughter “ “ “ James M. 7 W – Son “ “ “ 88-90 Long, James 34 W – Farming NC NC NC Rebeca E. 33 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Mophet, Syntha 8 W – Servant “ “ “ 89-91 Shuler, John 29 W – Farming NC NC NC Katha E. 27 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Novela J. 7 W – Daughter “ “ “ Laura R. 5 W – Daughter “ “ “ Curci 3 W – Daughter “ “ “ Fancy 6/12 W – Daughter “ “ “ 90-92 Mills, Thomas 57 W – Farming NC NC NC Elmina 46 W – Wife – House keeping SC SC NC David C. 16 W – Son – At home NC NC SC Sarah E. 7 W – Daughter “ “ “ Pannel, Jula F. 13 W – Niece NC NC NC 91-93 Shuler, Emanuel 63 W – Farming NC SC NC Eliza 58 W – Wife – House keeping NC TN TN Thomas 15 W – Son – At home NC NC NC 92-94 Shuler, George W. 26 W – Farming NC NC NC Malinda 27 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Lora C. 1 W – Daughter “ “ “ 93-95 Shuler, William L. 34 W – Farmer NC NC NC Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 16 Mary M. 31 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Rachel E. 12 W – Daughter – At home “ “ “ Robert B. 9 W – Son “ “ “ Margret O. 6 W – Daughter “ “ “ Hanson E. 3 W – Son “ “ “ Milos E. 10/12 W – Son “ “ “ 94-96 Crawford, Joseph A. 51 W – Farming NC NC NC Mary 47 W – Wife – House keeping GA NC NC James E. 19 W – Son – At home NC NC GA Lewis C. 17 W – Son – At home “ “ “ Joseph W. 14 W – Son – At home “ “ “ John 11 W – Son – At home “ “ “ Samuel W. 9 W -- Son “ “ “ Andrew J. 7 W – Son “ “ “ Sarah J. 6 W – Daughter “ “ “ Humphrey R. 3 W – Son “ “ “ 95-97 Blanton, William R. 32 W – Farming NC NC NC Dephina A. 28 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ James M. 10 W – Son – At home “ “ “ Mary J. 9 W – Daughter “ “ “ William H. 8 W -- Son “ “ “ Robert L. 6 W – Son “ “ “ George M. 4 W – Son “ “ “ Talitha C. 3 W – Daughter “ “ “ John W. 11/12 W – Son “ “ “ Blanton, Nancy 72 W – Mother “ “ “ 96-98 Mills, Ruben J. 18 W – Farming NC NC NC Queen V. 26 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Robert V. 4 W – Step-son “ “ “ 97-99 Patterson, William 33 W – Farming GA NC PA Thusary 32 W – Wife – House keeping GA SC SC James T. 13 W – Son – At school TN GA GA Mary 9 W – Daughter GA GA GA Virginia T. 6 W – Daughter “ “ “ John E. 5 W -- Son “ “ “ Luvina 4/12 W – Daughter NC GA GA 98-100 Hoyles, George 26 W – Farming NC NC NC Nancy E. 26 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Mary E. 7 W – Daughter “ “ “ Joseph M. 5 W -- Son “ “ “ Martha M. 3 W – Daughter “ “ “ William 1 W – Son “ “ “ 99-101 Honeycutt, (unreadable) 46 W – House keeping SC SC SC Jesse 19 W – Son – At home “ “ “ Annah 15 W – Daughter – At home “ “ “ 100-102 Henry, Alexander 31 W – Farming NC NC NC Arty 26 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Mary M. 9 W – Daughter “ “ “ Sarah L. 6 W – Daughter “ “ “ Mary J. 4 W – Daughter “ “ “ Miley E. 2 W – Daughter “ “ “ Arty E. 1/12 W – Daughter “ “ “ Queen, John B. 26 W – Servant “ “ “ Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 17 Descendants of Archer Blanton ED: Jim McGinnis a JCGS member, graciously submitted this article to the Society for use in JTJ. This article finishes up this excellent work by Joe. Notes for Samuel Martin Blanton: 1880 Census, Fannin Co., TX 1920 Census, Johnston Co., OK Myrick Twp. Pct. 1; pg 329 family 123 page 181a Samuel Blanton 26 Samuel 66 Bettie 17 b. TX Bettie 54 Robert 4 b. TX Bruce 34 Eliz 2 b. TX Ethel 24 William Perkins 14 b. TX brother in law Wm. Perkins 55 Mary Perkins 12 b. TX sister in law Georgia Perkins ?? mother in law Sources: 1. Census 1900 Indian Territory, Chickasaw Nation, Vol 6 sh. 15 ED 126 township Emet; page 247. 2. Census 1910 Johnston Co., OK, Myrick Twp. Pg. 265d fam 18. 3. Shirley Cookie Copeland, letter 23 Jun 1987. 4. Census 1920 Johnston Co., OK, Myrick Twp. Pg 181a, fam 49. iv. Elijah Sweezy Blanton He was born 5 Jun 1856 in Rutherford Co., NC and died 12 Nov 1934 in Tisomingo, OK. He married Margaret Louise Godwin 13 Sep 1883 in Whitewright, TX. She was the daughter of William Washington Godwin and Mary Elizabeth Camp Patterson. She was born 5 Dec 1867 in Leeds, Alabama and died 1 Jan 1850 in Tishomingo, OK. Notes for Elijah Blanton: His nickname was Lige, pronounced with a hard i. His father made a land transaction with a man named Elijah Sweezy in 1869. Probably selling him his home place since he moved to Texas in 1871. We haven’t found any kinship between the two men, so they might just have been good friends. Good enough friends for Stephen to name his son after the man. In 1870-1871 Stephen and his family moved to Texas. They crossed the Red River into Texas in January 1871. Elijah was 15 and walked behind the wagon carrying his father’s musket, all the way to Texas. Along the way, other wagons joined in, one in particular was William Godwin and family, coming from Alabama. They had a daughter, Maggie who was 5 years old at that time. She and Elijah later married in 1883. Elijah, Maggie & family appeared in the 1900 Census of Fannin Co., TX, call 236B, Justice Precinct #2, ED#70, family 59. Elijah, 44 born NC, father born NC, mother born NC; Maggie L., 32, born AL, father born AL, mother born AL; Edna L., 15, born TX; Homer S., 14, born TX, Eula L., 13, William E., 12; Elijah T. 11; Ora B. 5; Myrtle R. 4. Maggie reported she had borne 7 children with 7 still living and had been married 17 years. They moved to Wichita Falls, Texas, and appeared in the 1910 Census living at 304 Burnett Street. Elijah’s name was shown as Eliga S., 53, laborer at odd jobs; Margaret L., 42, married 26 years with 8 children born, 8 living; Stephen H., 24, b. TX, salesman at retail grocery; William E. (Ernest) 22, born TX, Mechanic for rail road, Elija T. (Taylor), 20, teamster for Ice Co.; Ora B. 15; Myrtle R., 12; Mary K. (Kate), 5. By 1919 they were living at Judge Cocke’s ranch near Antlers, OK. Their son Stephen Homer died at Antlers on 18 Apr 1919, leaving a wife and daughter. He was buried at Antlers City Cemetery. They moved back to Johnston County OK, living in the Bold Springs community north of Milburn. Elijah and family appeared in the 1920 Census of Johnston Co., OK, Thomas township, pg, 228 family 38:”Blanton, Eliph” age 62; Margaret L., 51; Kathryn 15, son Elijah (Taylor) 30; Bertha L. dau-in-law age 24. Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 18 Later they moved to the city of Tishomingo, living on First Street in a home purchased by Myrtle for them. Taylor and his wife Bertha lived with them, taking care of them after Elijah suffered a stroke, and taking care of Maggie until her death. Myrtle then gave the house to Taylor. Elijah and Maggie were members of the Marvin Methodist Church near Whitewright until moving to Tishomingo, OK. He spent most of his life farming. Elijah died 12 Nov 1934 and Maggie died 1 Jan 1950. Both are buried in the E. S. Blanton Cemetery near Whitewright. In 1983, Mary Marshall Morrow (granddaughter) her husband Robert Morrow and son W. R. “Bill” Morrow travelled to Bonham, Texas, the county seat of Fannin County, for a copy of Elijah & Maggie’s marriage license. To their surprise, the clerk had found the original marriage license, then 99 years old, within the files. She gave it to Mary, since she was the first relative to appear and request a copy. Mary still maintains the original license. Apparently, the license was sent there to be recorded and was not reclaimed by Elijah or Maggie. Sources of Information: 1. Marriage license of Elijah and Maggie Godwin Blanton. 2. Death certificates of Elijah and Margaret Blanton, OK State Health Dept. files #559 and #000489, shows father was Stephen Blanton born Raleigh, NC and mother McDaniel born ?. 3. Maggie’s death certificate shows her parents W. W. Goodman (sic) Godwin and Mollie Patterson. 4. Edna Blanton Marshall Bible belonging to Mary Marshall Marrow, 2501 Morrow Rd., Tishomingo, OK 5. Personal knowledge of Mary Marshall Morrow. 6. 1900 Census Fannin Co., TX Roll #T623 1633 ED 70 Vol 38 Sheet 3, line 82, family 59. 7. Newspaper articles from Sherman Daily. v. Sarah Womack Blanton She was born 1858 in Rutherford Co., NC. She married James Perry Johnson 21 Dec 1872 in Whitewright, Fannin Co., TX. He was born 1852 in NC and died 1932 in Elmore City, Garvin Co., OK. vi. Lyda Magdalene Blanton She was born Nov 1860 in Rutherford Co., NC and died 20 Feb 1901 in Chickasha, OK. She married William Melton Womack Nov 1876 in Fannin Co., TX. He was the son of Archilles Womack. He was born Aug 1850 in Roanoke, Virginia and died Aug 1916. 18. Elijah Blanton He was born 6 Dec 1823 in Rutherford Co., NC and died 11 Feb 1884 in Ellensboro, Rutherford Co., NC. He married (1) Sarah Phillips about 1846. She was born 8 Feb 1824 in NC and died 5 Jan 1854 in Rutherford Co., NC. He married (2) Nancy Harrill 13 Jun 1854 in Cleveland Co., NC. She was born 6 May 1816 in NC and died 9 Nov 1893 in Ellenboro, Rutherford Co., NC. Notes for Elijah Blanton: According to Louise Blanton McDonald research, Elijah went to Texas, but returned to North Carolina. Elijah’s first wife Sarah & kids taken from 1850 Census, Rutherford Co., NC Sandy Run District, fam #1206. Elijah, 26; Sarah, 26; Stephen, 3; Evaline, 8/12; Mary Phillips, 66 (probably Sarah’s mother.) Elijah’s brother Stephen lived about 10 dwellings from Elijah during the 1850 census, and a woman named Cyntha Phillips, age 45, born NC was living with Stephen. Probably also kin to Sarah. Elijah was a private in Co. B, 34th Reg NC Infantry, CSA. Enlisted 9/26/1863 at Burke Co., NC as private. Same day mustered into Co. E, McRae’s Batt. Cavalry. He was transferred out 6/15/1864. He was listed on rolls 12/5/63 place not stated. On 6/15/64 he transferred into Co. B, 34th Inf. He was surrendered on 4/91865 at Appomattox Court House, VA. Elijah & family (2nd wife, Nancy), are listed in 1860 Rutherford Co., NC Census, pg. 380, Broad District, Webbs Ford Post Office, family 1528. Elija age 36; Nancy 44; Stephen 13. Evaline 10; Ester 8; George 6; James 5; Menard 5; John 3’ Sarah 1; Jeremiah Blanton (father) age 85 born Virginia. Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 19 Elijah & family (2nd wife Nancy) are listed in 1870 Rutherford Co., NC Census, pg. 40 B, fam #177. His father Jeremiah Blanton is living with him, shown as age 95 and born in Virginia. Children of Elijah Tatham and Sarah Phillips are: i. Stephen Taylor Blanton He was born 9 Oct 1846 in Rutherford Co., NC and died 1899 in Shelby, Cleveland Co., NC. He married Agnes Eugenie Jamison. She was born in Blythewood, SC. Notes for Stephen Blanton: Private, Co. B., 34th NC Infantry, CSA. Residence Rutherford Co., NC; a 15 year old farmer. Enlisted 9/2/1861 at Rutherford Co. as a private. He mustered into NC 1st Batt. Junior Reserves. On 10/25/1861 he mustered into “B” Co., NC 34th Inf. He was discharged 11/8/1862 by reason of being underage. Source of information: Mike Kalb email 6/7/2004. ii. Evaline Blanton She was born 18 Oct 1849 in Rutherford Co., NC and died 19 Jan 1937. She married D. N. Hamrick. iii. Esther Blanton She was born 20 Aug 1851 in Rutherford Co., NC. iv. George Washington Blanton He was born 10 Oct 1853 in Rutherford Co., NC and died after 1880. Notes for George Blanton: A George W. Blanton, age 28, appears in the 1880 Census of Fannin Co., TX, living with Stephen F. Blanton and family. We assume him to be the son of Elijah. Children of Elijah Blanton and Nancy Harrill are: v. James Madison Blanton He was born 9 Apr 1855. vi. Joseph Menard Blanton He was born 9 Apr 1855. vii. John Adams Blanton He was born 4 Jul 1857 in Rutherford Co., NC and died 29 Sep 1898. He married Nancy Elizabeth Byers 4 Jan 1887. She was born 26 Jan 1864 and died 31 Jul 1935. viii. Sarah M. Blanton She was born 29 Nov 1858. ix. William Alexander Blanton He was born 9 May 1862 in Rutherford Co., NC and died 19 Sep 1862 in Rutherford Co., NC. 19 James Blanton He was born 1801 in NC and died 1871 in Pomerey, Wyandotte Co., Kansas. He married Mary V. Jay. She was born 1802 in NC and died 1892 in Rutherford Co., NC. Notes for James Blanton: 1850 Census, Rutherford Co., NC High Shoals, pg 283a: James Blanton 49, laborer, born NC; Mary 48, NC; Joseph B. 200; Sarah 17; Louisa 15. 1860 Census, Polk Co., NC, Cooper Gap Divn. Pg 136: Jas Blanton 58 NC shoemaker; Mary 56; Mary L. 25 (probably Louisa, 15, in the 1850 Census.) Children of James Blanton and Mary Jay are: i. William Jay Blanton He was born 1823 in NC and died 1863 in the Civil War. He married Cynthia E. Coward 24 Jan 1844. She was born 1825 in NC. Notes for William Blanton: William Jay Blanton 24 Jan 1844 marriage to Cynthia E. Coward, record 086 01 023, James Blanton, Bondsman. Bond 000132475. 1860 Census, Polk Co., NC, Cooper Ga Divn., pg 136: William Blanton 37, born NC; Cynthia E. 35, children listed. Next door is father James Blanton. ii. Edward Ketcherside Blanton He was born 1825 Rutherford Co., NC. He married Mary Ann Unknown. She was born 1828 in NC and died after 1880. Notes for Edward Blanton: 1850 Census, Rutherford Co., NC, High Shoals, p. 292B: E. R. Blanton, 25, born NC; Mary, 22, NC; Victory 4; John 2; Amelia 4/12. Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 20 1860 Census, Yancy Co., NC, Red Hill Post Office, pg 434: Edward K. Blanton, 35, NC, Bap Clergyman; Mary Ann, 33; Victoria 14; John G. 13; Amelia A. 10; Joseph J. 8; Alfred W. 6; Callis R. 3; James K. 1. 1870 Census, Wyanodotte Co., Kansas, 2 wd, pg 627: Edward K. Blanton, 45 born NC, Minister. Not living with family. May have moved there ahead of the family. 1880 Census, Wyandotte Co., KS, Quindaro, pg 307c: Edward K. 53, NC, Colposteur AJS; Mary Ann, 52; Joseph J. 28; C. King 23; James R. G. 21; Joseph E. 11; Mary V. 76, mother. Victoria Bliss lives next door, daughter? iii. Martha Blanton She was born 1827 in NC. She married Preston Lewis. He was born 1806 in NC. iv. Joseph Robert Blanton He was born 1829 in NC and died 1886. Notes for Joseph Blanton: 1870 Census, Wyandotte Co, KS, Quindaro Tep., pg. 547: Joseph R. Blanton, 41, NC, Minister; Mary E. 36, NC, James F. 18; Mary E. 14; Colie (female) 10; Wm. S. 5; Lula 3. v. Sarah A. N. Blanton She was born 1833 in Rutherford Co., NC. She married W. B. Mills 12 Nov 1850 in Rutherford Co., NC. vi. Louisa Blanton She was born 1835 in Rutherford Co., NC. She married J. Willis Owens 13 Dec 1863 in Rutherford Co., NC. 20. Thomas Jefferson Blanton He was bon 1812 in NC and died 6 May 1864 in the Battle of the Wilderness, Virginia. He married Elizabeth Johnston 19 Nov 1838 in Rutherford Co., NC. She was born 1820 in NC. Notes for Thomas Blanton: Thomas was born in and was living in Cleveland Co., NC when he joined the CSA at age 49 on 22 Aug 1861. He was mustered into Co. H, 28th NC Inf. He was listed POW 5/27/1862 Wilderness, VA. Confined 5/31/1862 Fort Monroe, VA. Transferred 6/15/1862 Fort Columbus, NY. Paroled 7/12/1862 Fort Columbus, NY. Transferred 7/12/1862 Aiken’s Landing, VA. Exchanged 8/5/1862 Aiken’s Landing. Returned to the war and was killed 5/6/1864 at Wilderness, VA. Source: NC Troops 1861-1865, A Roster Children of Thomas Blanton and Elizabeth Johnston are: i. George Blanton He was born 1842. ii. Julia Blanton She was born 1845. iii. Amanda Blanton She was born 1847. iv. Mira Blanton She was born 1850. 21. Jackson Blanton He was born 4 Sep 1816 in NC and died 3 Dec 1887 in Boiling Springs, NC. He married Sarah Byers. She was born 3 May 1821 and died 11 May 1898 in Boiling Springs, NC. Children of Jackson Blanton and Sarah Byers are: i. Young A. Blanton He was born 1842. ii. Hartwell Sain Blanton He was born Dec. 1844. iii. Mary Jane Blanton she was born 18 Jul 1847 and died 4 May 1889. She married William Miller Morehead 22 Aug 1867. iv. Charles Tyrell Blanton He was born 10 Jul 1849. v. Jonas Monroe Blanton He was born 1852. vi. Elizabeth P. Blanton She was born 1854. vii. Susanh Clarinda Blanton She was born 18 Jul 1856. viii. Sarah Anderson Blanton She was born 1859. ix. Luvianne Ann Blanton She was born 1860. x. Cleophus Postell Blanton He was born 1861. Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 21 1939 Jackson County Death Certificates of Persons Born 1900 – 1939 [Key to reading the following: Name of deceased; Date of birth; Place of birth; 1939 date of death; Father’s name; Father’s place of birth; Mother’s name; Mother’s place of birth; Informant’s name; Informant’s address; Cemetery. Abstracted by Sanji Talley Watson in the Jackson County Register of Deeds Office 2015.] Webster Cowan, Patrick Henry; 10 y; ng; 14 Apr; ng; ng; ng; ng; Stillwell Ashe, Edwin; 4 Sep 1921; Jackson Co.; 9 Mar; William Tecumech Ashe; Jackson Co.; Hollie Painter; Jackson Co.; Tecumech Ashe; Webster; Lovedale Lackey, Elf Edward: 2 Mar 1905; Haywood Co.; 26 Jan; Jeff Lackey; Macon Co.; Lela Burston; Macon Co.; Ethel Blakely; Webster; Cullowhee Cagle, Wilma; 7 Jul 1939; Dillsboro; 4 Jul; Earl Cagle; Jackson Co.; Lillie Shuler; Jackson Co.; Earl Cagle; Dillsboro; Cagle Shuler, Annie Pearl; 22 Oct 1938; Webster; 6 Aug; Roy Shuler; Jackson Co.; Lucille Mathis; Jackson Co.; Roy Shuler; Webster; Love’s Chapel Allman, Infant Girl; 23 Sep 1939; Webster; 23 Sep; John Allman; Webster; Mayme Bumgarner; Webster; John Allman; Webster; Webster Sylva Ammons, Shirley Evelyn; 23 Jun 1938; Sylva; 26 May; Roy Lee Ammons; NC; Candas Pearl Conner; Sylva; Thad Conner; Sylva; Old Field Sims, Molly Josephine; w/o M. V.; 19 Dec 1902; White Co., GA; 15 May; Simp Fain; White Co., GA; Ama Abernathy; White Co., GA; M.V. Sims; Sylva; Helen, GA Morgan, Hattie Alice: 10 m; Sylva; 24 Aug; Charlie Morgan; Sylva; Gracie Hooper; Beta; Charlie Morgan; Sylva; Caney Fork Hamilton, Roy; 29 y; Tennessee; 29 Sep; John P. Hamilton; Tennessee; ng; ng; John Lambert; Knoxville, TN; Highland, Sparta, TN Elliot, Helen Delila; w/o Archie; 7 Feb 1918; NC; 22 Feb; Melton Rice; NC; Fidellia Dalton; NC; Mrs. Floyd P. Crisp; Robbinsville; Robbinsville Wike, Conus Lenoir Hooper; w/o Frank W.; 31 Jul 1903; 16 Apr; Lawrence Hooper; Jackson Co.; Daisy Wilson; Jackson Co.; Frank Wike; Cullowhee; Cashiers Brock, D. L., Jr.; 24 May 1936; Graham Co.; 26 Mar; Don L. Brock; Graham Co.; Love Bures; Graham Co.; D. L. Brock; Japan, NC; Japan, NC Farmer, Adanice; 19 Dec 1933; Qualla; 6 Jul; James B. Framer; NC; Manilla Hall; NC; James B. Farmer; Whittier; Olivett Wills, Barry; 25 Aug 1939; Sylva; 25 Aug; Joseph Frank Wills; Leicester, NC; Annie Sue Rickman; Sylva; J. Frank Wills; Sylva; Sylva McDonald, John Edward; 17 May 1926; Sylva; 4 Oct; John Patterson; ng; Frances Dorsey; Sylva; Frances Dorsey; Sylva; Harris Mundy, Lillie Joan; 20 Dec 1939; Sylva; 28 Dec; Ralph Mundy; Virginia; Birdell Tallent; NC; Mrs. Gladys Tallent; Sylva; Keener Crawford, Bonnie Allen: 1 y, 5 m, 2 d; NC; 9 Feb; Allen Crawford; Sylva; Janie V.Crawford; Sylva; Allen Crawford; ng; Balsam Scotts Creek Mathis, Carroll; 18 d; ng; 3 May; ng; ng; Blanche Mathis; NC; Blanche Mathis; Sylva; Crawford Savannah Bryson, Betty Sue; 18 Feb 1924; Gay; 20 Feb; Fred Bryson; Gay; Arbutus Talent; Jackson Co.; Will Bryson; Greens Creek; Wesleyanna Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 22 Buchanan, Shelby Jean; 2 m; Greens Creek; 20 Jul; Raymond Buchanan; Jackson Co.; Isabelle Reese; Jackson Co.; Hampton Hall; Greens Creek; East Fork River Ashe, Robert D.; 20 Aug 1937; Tuckasegee; 11 Jun; Virgil Ashe; NC; Hulda Golden; NC; Luster Ashe; Tuckasegee; Tuckasegee Zachary, David Jackson; 11 Jun 1939; East La Porte; 13 Jun; J. J. Zachary; East La Porte; Amanda Stephens; East La Porte; J. J. Zachary; East La Porte; East La Porte Qualla Reed, Elliot; 9 Feb 1939; Cherokee; 9 Feb; Edison Littlejohn; Cherokee; Ester Reed; Cherokee; Cornelius Reed; Cherokee; Cherokee Keener, Joyce Louise; 24 May 1939; Whittier; 18 Aug 1939; Wayne Keener; Whittier; Elizabeth Hipps; Whittier; Wayne Keener; Whittier; Olivett Cucumber, Cindy; w/o Jack; 17 Mar 1919; Cherokee; 14 Apr; Sherman Taylor; Cherokee; Maggie Hornbuckle; Cherokee; Jack Cucumber; Cherokee; Soco Cucumber, Lily; 2 Sep 1937; Cherokee; 22 Oct; Jack Cucumber; Cherokee; Cindy Taylor; Cherokee; Jack Cucumber; Cherokee; Soco Howell Infant Girl; 1 Nov 1939; Whittier; 1 Nov; Horace Howell; Whittier; Annie Battle; Whittier; Horace Howell; Whittier; Thomas Carver, Infant Girl; 1 Dec 1939; Jackson Co.; 1 Dec; ng; ng; Leona Carver; Swain Co.; Henry Carver; Whittier; Union Hill Dugan, Bobby Harold; 21 Dec 1939; Whittier; 27 Dec; Percial Kelly Dugan; Jackson Co.; Nina Eva McHan; Almond, NC; Percival Dugan; Whittier; Thomas Mountain Coggins, Henry Haven; 9 d; Jackson Co.; 3 Mar; ng; ng; Violet Mathis; Jackson Co.; Oma Mathis; Speedwell; Double Springs Hamburg Young, Leonard Hanes; 14 May 1922; NC; 21 Mar; Anderson Alfred Young; NC; Monie Watson; NC; Mrs. Lonie Young; ng; Glenville Holland, Mack Vance; 3 d; Bessie; 4 Jan; Harry Holland; NC; Ruthie J. Watson; NC; Harry Holland; Glenville; Erastus Murphy, Juanita; 2 Feb 1938; Glenville; 4 Jun; Buford Murphy; NC; Laura Young; NC; Buford Murphy; Glenville; Big Ridge Eldridge, J. R.; 29 y; Lewisburg, TN; 29 Sep; Claude Eldridge; Lewisburg, TN; Maxie Simpson; Murphreboro, TN; John Lambert; Knoxville, TN; Crossville, TN Sims, Willis Coleman; 2 y, 5 m; Franklin, NC; 15 Oct; Frank Harley Sims; NC; Thelma Waldroop; SC; Frank Sims; Glenville; Erastus Broom, Laura Young; w/o Brady; 30 y, 30 d; Jackson Co.; 6 Dec; T. J. Young; Jackson Co.; Salena Wilson; Jackson Co.; Lena Young; Glenville; Big Ridge Greens Creek Deitz, Harold Lee; 10 d; Greens Creek; 9 Aug; Jerry Jackson Deitz; Greens Creek; Fay Alexander; Greens Creek; Jerr Jackson Deitz; Greens Creek; East Fork Green, Infant Girl; 24 Sep 1939; Greens Creek; 24 Sep; Lenore Green; NC; Nellie Trantham; NC; Lenore Green; ng; Greens Creek Dillsboro Dunkins, Frank Garrett; h/o Maurine; 32 y, 9 m, 3 d; Richmond Co., NC; 8 Apr; Raiford Dunkins; Scotland Co., NC; ng; ng; Mack Dunkins; Gastonia; Belmont, NC Cunningham, Margaret Ruth; 29 Apr 1939; NC; 3 May; Weaver Cunningham; NC; Bonnie Hensley; NC; Weaver Cunningham; Dillsboro; Locust Field Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 23 Cochran, Johnie Ray; 8 Feb 1915; Dillsboro; 8 Aug; John Taylor Cochran; Swain Co.; Annie Robinson; Dillsboro; Mrs. T. M. Rogers; Dillsboro; Robinson Cullowhee Passmore, Mary Faye Ashe; 10 Feb 1939; Cullowhee; 25 Feb; Edward Passmore; NC; Mary Ashe; Webster; Edward Passmore; Cullowhee; Cullowhee Wilson, John William; 15 May 1938; ng; 20 May; Laurence Wilson; Speedwell; Bessie Ashe; Webster; Dewey Wilson; Cullowhee; Cullowhee Taylor, Avery Martin; 1 y, 6 d; Speedwell; 18 Jan; Otis Clingman Taylor; Speedwell; Lola Lee West; Transylvania Co.; Ottis C. Taylor; ng; ng Webb, Edra Mae; 22 Oct 1939; Speedwell; 29 Oct; William Webb; Speedwell; Eva Belle Paterson; Speedwell; William Webb; Speedwell; Hooper Long, John Gilead; 22 Jun 1918; Cullowhee; 8 Dec; John C. Long; Cullowhee; Laura Henson; Glenville; Hattie Lou Long; ng; Cullowhee Cashiers Allen, Frankie Elizabeth; 1 y, 5 m, 7 d; Cashiers; 30 Jan; Frank Allen; Salem, SC; Margery Bumgarner; Jackson Co.; Mrs. E. A. Bumgarner; Cashiers; Cashiers Searcy, Betty Jean; 1 , 3 m, 4 d; Rosman, NC; 23 Jul; Lee Ottis Searcy; Davidson River, NC; Ella Mae Elders; Transylvania Co.; Le Ottis Searcy;ng; Oak Grove Bradley, Etta Cumi; w/o Jerry; 26 y; Oconee Co., SC; 4 Jul; R. J. White; Jackson Co.; Elizabeth Hicks; Rabun Co., GA; R. J. White; Cashiers; Zachary Queen, William Edward; 1 y, 2 m, 4 d; Jackson Co.; 7 Sep; Oscar Queen; Brevard, NC; Lila Queen; Brevard, NC; Oscar Queen; Brevard, NC; Cullowhee Moore, Bert Homer; h/o Dorothy; ng; ng; 6 Jul; ng; ng; ng; ng; Mrs. Dorothy Moore; Cincinnati, Ohio; Cincinnati, Ohio Caney Fork Middleton, William Henry; 1 y, 10 m, 2 d; East La Porte; 26 Dec; Ransom Middleton; East La Porte; Edna Ledford; NC; Carlos Middleton; East La Porte; East La Porte Masengale, Creasie Oleen; 2 y, 5 m, 23 d; Cowarts; 4 Sep; Oran Orlan Masengale; Argura; Myrtle Jones; Cowarts; Orlan Masengale; ng; Rich Mountain Johnson, Joyce; 4 Jan 1938; Cowarts; 12 Dec; Waitsell Johnson; NC; Laura Carson; NC; Waitsell Johnson; ng; Balsam Grove Canada Phillips, Shelby Jean; 3 d; Wolf Mountain; 18 May; Sherman Phillips; Wolf Mountain; Birdie Ashe; Tuckasegee; Sherman Phillips; Wolf Mountain; Phillips Shook, Jessie Mae; 19 y, 9 m, 26 d; Wolf Mountain; 19 Sep; Spurgeon Shook; Argura; Elsie Mae Banther; Wolf Mountain; Elsie Mae Davis; ng; Wolf Mountain Barkers Creek Dills, Brodie; 11 y; Barkers Creek; 4 May; James Dills; Jackson Co.; Sallie Gunter; Jackson Co.; Claude Gunter; Whittier; Barkers Creek Messer, Virginia Elle Bee; 1 m; NC; 29 Jun; Jhonnie Messer; NC; Inlee W. Ashe; NC; Emer Messer; ng; Barkers Creek Dills, Marie; 26 y, 8 m, 4 d; Barkers Creek; 17 Jul; Jim Dills; Barkers Creek; Sallie Gunter; Barkers Creek; Claude Gunter; Whittier; Barkers Creek Messer, Deasie; 35 y; ng; 6 Sep; Jhon Wike; NC; Polly Bealsey; NC; Hobert Gibson; Whittier; Barkers Creek Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 24 William Holland Thomas’ Store Ledgers Jason Gregory, JCGS Vice- President In 2013, I visited Duke University for a two day research session. My sole purpose was to copy the ledgers of William Holland Thomas. I copied 24 volumes, containing 3600 pages, spanning the years 1832 through 1855. I ran out of time and was not able to complete the all of the copies. I intend to return and complete the years of 1864 to 1875 that are also there in the near future. On the office computer, there are hundreds of other documents to view that were copied from three institutions: Hunter Library Special Collections; University of Tennessee, Knoxville Special Collections and Duke University Special Collections. These institutions all house the known papers of William Holland Thomas’ business activities in western North Carolina. It is my opinion that, these ledgers are an invaluable pre 1850 resource, since records from this period are very limited. (ED Note: The ledger sheets have been printed and bound into books and are available for anyone to take a look at. We also have a digital copy available for use.) Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 25 Descendants of John Montgomery Beck ED: This article was prepared by Fred Bernard Beck. It was brought to the Society by JCGS member, Dorris Beck. 88. Betty Lee Beck She was bon 19 Jan 1923 in Paris, Edgar Co., IL. She married Maurice P. “Bud” Hays in Terre Haute, IN. Children of Betty Beck and Mauice Hays are: 126. i. Steven P. Hays 127. ii. David L. Hays 128. iii. Mark D. Hays 129. iv. Jeffery A. Hays 89. John Robert “Bud” Beck He was born 23 Dec 1924 in Paris, Edgar Co., IL and died 31 Dec 1991. He married Joan Conley in Terre Haute, IN. Children of John Beck and Joan Conley are: 130. i. John M. Beck 131. ii. Donald L. Beck 132. iii. Robert D. Beck 96. Leatha M. McClure She was born 7 Apr 1915 in Glassy Mountain, Greenville Co., SC and died 21 Sep 1998 in Glassy Mountain, Greenville Co., SC. She married Curnel Lee Lockhart, son of Jonas Lockhart and Sallie Belue. He was born 31 Jul 1913 n Glassy Mountain, Greenville Co., SC and died 11 Dec 1990 in Glassy Mountain, Greenville Co., SC. They are both buried at Oak Grove Baptist Church Cemetery, Glassy Mountain, Greenville Co., SC. Children of Leatha McClure and Curnel Lockhart are: 133. i. Virginia Lockhart She was born 15 Nov 1933 134. ii. Gertrude “Greta” Lockhart She was born 6 Jun 1937 135. iii. Shelby Lockhart She was born 17 Jun 1939 136. iv. Lula Lockhart She was born 8 Feb 1942 137. v. John “Johnny” Lockhart He was born 20 Dec 1943 138. vi. Janice Lockhart She was born 11 Nov 1946 She married James Edward Borgia 2 Oct 1976. He was born 27 Oct 1939. 139. vii Gary Lockhart He was born 10 Jul 1948 140. viii. Joyce Lockhart She was born 9 Dec 1949 97. Nell McClure She married Ernest Huggins. Children of Nell McClure and Ernest Huggins are: 141. i. Billy Huggins 142. ii. Beverly Jean Huggins She was born 29 Jan 1945 in Hendersonville, Henderson Co., NC. 99. William Thaddeus Beck, Jr. He was born 3 Nov 1925 in Glassy Mountain, Greenville Co., SC. He married Margaret Mozell Peck 2 Apr 1946 in Spartanburg, Spartanburg Co. SC. She was born 20 Jan 1928 in Spartanburg, Spartanburg Co., SC. Children of William Beck and Margaret Peck are: 143. i. William Randall Beck He was born 9 Jan 1947 in Spartanburg, Spartanburg Co., SC Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 26 144. ii. Thaddeus Dewayne Beck He was born 24 Feb 1953 in Spartanburg, Spartanburg Co. SC. 102. Eugene Cameron Beck He was born 28 Dec 1930 in Glassy Mountain, Greenville Co., SC. He married (1) Dorothy J. Rhinehart 16 Jan 1951. She was born 26 May 1935 in Haywood Co., NC. He married (2) Sondra S. Corr 11 Jul 1968. She was born 29 Feb 1944. Children of Eugene Beck and Dorothy Rhinehart are: 145. i. Deborah Jean Beck She was born 26 Apr 1953 at McDill Air Force Base, Florida 146. ii. Cheryl D. Beck She was born 11 Oct 1956 at Ardmore Air Force Base, Oklahoma. 147. iii. Toni R. Beck She was born 3 Apr 1961. Child of Eugene Beck and Sondra Corr is: 148. i. Stephen E. Beck He was born 9 Sep 1969. 104. Laura Geraldine Beck She was born 2 Mar 1936 in Spartanburg, Spartanburg Co., SC and died 13 Aug 2004 in Cowpens, Gaffney, SC. She married Georg Washington Wright. Children of Laura Beck and George Wright are: 149. i. Donna Wright 150. ii. Laura Wright 151. iii. Erika Wright 152. iv. George David Wright 105. Fred Benard Beck He was born 11 Jul 1939 in Glassy Mountain, Greenville Co., SC. He married Judithann Porter 4 Oct 1965 in Spartanburg, Spartanburg Co., SC, daughter of Earl Porter and Helen Cooksey. She was born 28 Jan 1946 in Spartanburg, Spartanburg Co., SC. Child of Fred Beck and Judithann Porter is: 153. i. Cameron Lynn Beck She was born 27 Aug 1968 in Hampton, Virginia. 108. Walter Hershel Garren He was born 12 Jan 1934 in Henderson Co., NC. He married Carolyn Levohn Bishop 11 Jan 1954 in Henderson Co., NC. She was born 21 Apr 1931 in Henderson Co., NC. Child of Walter Garren and Carolyn Bishop is: 154. i. Robert Hershel Garren He was born 3 Apr 1956 in Henderson Co., NC. 109. Barry Edward Hollingsworth He was born 19 Nov 1944. He married Peggy Lou Keith 13 Feb 1967. She was born 12 Jan 1948. Children of Barry Hollingsworth and Peggy Keith are: 155. i. Keith Edward Hollingsworth He was born 12 Mar 1968. 156. ii. Janet Lynn Hollingsworth She was born 7 Jan 1970. 110. Phyllis Althea Beck She was born 17 Aug 1924 in Hendersonville, Henderson Co., NC, and died 26 Oct 1963 in Miami, Dade Co., FL. She married Norman Virgil Harmon 21 Feb 1946 in North Augusta, GA. He was born 10 Feb 1915 and died 15 Mar 1969 in Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., NC. Children of Phyllis Beck and Norman Harmon are: 157. i. George Loren Harmon He was born 4 Dec 1946 in Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., NC. Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 27 158. ii. Lelia Irene Harmon She was born 22 May 1950 in Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., NC. 111. Virginia Iris Beck She was born 8 Jun 1926 in Hendersonville, Henderson Co., NC. She married (1) Olin W. Norton 1945 in Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., NC. She married (2) Raymond Lee Womeldorff 16 May 1956, in York, SC. He was born 5 Jun 1925 in Miami, OK and died 20 Jan 1984 in Charleston, SC. He is buried in Oakdale Cemetery, Henderson Co., NC. Child of Virginia Beck and Olin Norton is: 159. i. James Robin Norton He was born 20 Sep 1946 in Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., NC. 113. Faith Gardenia Beck She was born 28 Jan 1933 in Hamlet, NC. She married Campbell White Choat. Children of Faith Beck and Campbell Choat are: 160. i. Campbell White Choat, Jr. 161. ii. David Choat 116. Carol Cynthia Beck She was born 13 Sep 1944 in Charleston, SC. She married David Rickman Orr 27 Oct 1973 He was born 16 Feb 1936 in Hendersonville, Henderson Co., NC and died 25 Jun 2003 in Hendersonville, Henderson Co., NC. He was buried in Oakdale Cemetery, Henderson, Co., NC. She was an elementary school teacher and he worked as Director of Personnel, Cranston Print Works. Children of Carol Beck and David Orr are: 162. i. Ashley Carole Orr She was born 29 Apr 1975 in Hendersonville, Henderson Co., NC. She married Donald Lee Self 24 Apr 2005 in Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., NC. 163. ii. David Rickman Orr, Jr. He was born 9 Dec 1978 n Asheville, Buncombe Co., NC. 119. Johnny Ray Brown He was born 10 Jan 1951 in Sylva, Jackson Co., NC. He married Bertha Rolinson. She was born 15 Apr 1946. Child of Johnny Brown and Bertha Rolinson is: 164. i. Rosa Brown She was born 11 Dec 1966 in Sylva, Jackson Co., NC. 120. Linda Sue Brown She was born 30 Dec 1952 in Sylva, Jackson Co., NC. She married Jesse Calvin Farmer 28 Dec 1973, the son of Mack Farmer and Aquilla Henry. He was born 20 Sep 1954 in Jackson Co., NC. Children of Linda Brown and Jesse Farmer are: 165. i. Michelle Lynn Farmer She was born 22 May 1975. 166. ii. Michael Calvin Farmer He was born 4 Feb 1977. 122. Beverly Brown She was born 2 Dec 1970 in Sylva, Jackson Co., NC. She married (1) Steve Hines, She married (2) Unknown McDonald. Child of Beverly Brown and Steve Hines is: 167. i. Hilleary Hines She was born 14 Mar 2000. Children of Beverly Brown and Unknown McDonald are: 168, i. David McDonald He was born 26 Dec 1988. 169. ii. Justin McDonald He was born 29 Oct 1990. Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 28 Generation 6 133. Virginia Lockhart She was born 15 Nov 1933. She married J. C. Burrell. Children of Virginia Lockhart and J. C. Burrell are: 170. i. Roger Burrell He was born 30 Apr 1957. 171. ii. Donna Burrell she was born 8 Jul 1962. 134. Gertrude “Greta” Lockart she was born 6 Jun 1937. She married John Searcy. He was born 8 Mar 1935. Children of Gertrude Lockhart and John Searcy are: 172. i. Terry Searcy He was born 2 Sep 1955. 173. ii. Jeff Searcy He was born 7 Jul 1966. 135. Shelby Lockhart She was born 17 Jun 1939. She married Douglas Umphress. He was born 17 mar 1939. Children of Shelby Lockhart and Douglas Umphress are: 174. i. Sandra Umphress She was born 28 Oct 1962. 175. ii. Cynthia Umphress She was born 12 Aug 1970. A Little Extra This interesting piece of information was brought in by Mary Buchanan Smith. She and Bill Crawford believe that this is for the Old Savannah Church and Cemetery. An Act granting to persons therein named certain lands for a burying ground and place of worship for all denominations of Christians, in Macon County. Whereas the meeting house and burying ground, on Savannah Creek in Macon county, is on the public lands: Be it therefore enacted by the General Assembly of the State of North Carolina, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, That the governor is hereby authorized and directed to cause to be issued a grant for five acres of land to Jacob Mason, Amos Cabe, William Little, Richard Wilson, Isaac Ashe, and their successors, to hold in trust, for a burying ground and place of public worship of Almighty God for all denominations of Christians forever. II. Be it further enacted, Tate before said grant shall issue, the grantees shall have the aforesaid five acres surveyed by the county surveyor of Macon county, and upon his plat and certificate representing that he has surveyed said and out o the eighth district and one hundred and forty fifth section of the Cherokee lands, lying on the waters of Savannah Creek, in Macon county, including the Spring Meeting House and burying ground, situated in said section, the grant shall issue accordingly. Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 29 Doctor’s Daily Journal ED: JCGS member Anna Frasier brought the 1915 Daily Journal of Dr. C. Z. Candler to our attention. We have decided to publish the days that he has completed in the journal. This is the last installment of the journal. All spelling and abbreviations are as written in book. Transcribed 2015 by Sanji Talley Watson. Oct 30 Clear & cool Danil. Fullbright – for visit 3.50 Chas. Mason – for Tub. inj. 1.00 Mrs. Ellis Painter – for Tub. inj. 1.00 Mrs. W. H. Green – for Tub. inj. 1.00 1.00 S. W. Enloe – for visit 2.00 2.00 Oct 31 Clear & cool S. W. Enloe – for visit 2.00 2.00 -- incidental 1.00 1.00 OCT totals 210.75 186.50 Nov 1 Clear & cool Holmes Patterson – for visit 10.00 15.00 S. W. Enloe – for visit 2.00 2.00 Jno. S. Buchanan – for visit 5.00 -- incidental 1.00 1.00 Nov 2 Clear & cool S. W. Enloe – for visit 2.00 2.00 Mitchell Sutton – for visit 1.00 5.00 Karl Green – ½ 2.50 Harve Cagle – ½ .50 Rufe Green – for visit 2.00 Nov 3 Clear & cool S. W. Enloe – for visit 2.00 2.00 -- incidental 2.00 2.00 Nov 4 Clear & cool S. W. Enloe – for visit 2.00 2.00 Robt. Fisher – for visit 2.50 Nov 5 Cloudy & cool Ellis Beasley – for visit 3.00 1.50 S. W. Enloe – for visit 2.00 2.00 -- incidental 2.00 2.00 Nov 6 Clear & Warm S. W. Enloe – for visit 2.00 2.00 -- incidental 1.00 1.00 Mrs. W. H. Green – for Tub. inj. 1.00 1.00 Chas. Mason – for Tub. inj. 1.00 Mrs. Ellis Painter – for Tub. inj. 1.00 Nov 7 Clear &warm David Cabe – Prof services for wife 10.00 S. W. Enloe – for visit 2.00 2.00 -- incidental 1.00 1.00 Chas. Mason – for visit 2.00 Nov 8 Cloudy & cool Chas. Mason – for visit 1.00 W. M. Robinson – for o visit 2.00 Carl Green – for 2 Tub. inj. (wife) 2.00 Nov 9 Cole Cagle – ½ 3.00 S. W. Enloe – for visit 2.00 2.00 Chas. Mason – for visit 1.00 -- incidental 1.00 1.00 Nov 10 Garfield Turpin – ½ 1.50 Frank Watson – for visit 2.00 2.00 Chas. Mason – for visit 1.00 -- incidental 1.00 1.00 Nov 11 Cloudy & warm Geo. Lewis – for visit 3.00 3.00 Chas. Mason – for visit 2.00 -- incidental 1.00 1.00 Thos. Buchanan – ½ 3.50 Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 30 Nov 12 Cloudy & showery Homer Patterson – Prof services (wife) 15.00 25.00 Chas. Mason – for visit 2.00 Nov 13 Cloudy & rain Chas. Mason – for visit 2.00 Mrs. W. H. Green – For Tub. inj. 1.00 1.00 -- incidental 2.00 2.00 Mrs. Ellis Painter – for Tub. inj. 1.00 Mack Mathis – ½ 2.00 Nov 14 Cloudy & rain Chas. Mason – for visit 2.00 Thos. Farley – for visit 4.00 Robt. Clayton – Prof services for wife 10.00 Joe Davis – for visit 1.00 1.00 S. W. Enloe – for visit 2.00 2.00 Nov 15 Clear & cold Chas. Mason – for visit 2.00 -- incidental 2.00 2.00 H. Bryson – for visit 2.00 Mack Hall – for Tub. inj. 1.00 1.00 Carl Green – for Tub. inj. (wife) 1.00 Nov 16 Cory Mills - ?? 2.50 Nov 17 Jefferson Stand. Life – ½ 10.00 Alec Moore – ½ 2.50 Nov 20 Ellis Painter – Tub. inj. 1.00 Nov 21 J. M. Welch – Prof services for wife 2.00 2.00 Nov 22 J. W. Cutheberson – 1/2 5.00 Thad Robinson – for visit 20.00 20.00 Jno. Stewart - for visit 5.00 -- incidental 1.00 1.00 Nov 23 W. B. Davis – ½ 5.00 Cling Ensley – on acct .40 Leander Higdon – by cash ½ 2.00 Jerome Sutton – ½ 2.50 M. L. Hall – for Tub. inj. 1.00 1.00 Jas. Love (col) – for visit 2.50 Jno. Green – ½ 4.50 Nov 24 Mr. Knight – ½ 1.00 J. H. Cathey – ½ 4.00 Mr. Withers – ½ 1.00 David Green – ½ 2.50 H. M. Morris – ½ 1.50 Mrs. Jno. Pruitt – ½ .50 Fred McLain – ½ 2.00 Nov 26 Arch Ward – ½ 5.00 Lon Henson – ½ 1.50 John Shepperd – ½ 2.50 Jno. Phillips – ½ 6.00 Nov 27 W. C. Green – ½ .50 Nathaniel Deitz – ½ 1.00 Mrs. W. H. Green – for Tub. inj. 1.00 1.00 Chas. Mason – for Tub. inj. 1.00 Mrs. Ellis Painter – for Tub. inj. 1.00 -- incidental 5.00 5.00 Nov 28 Wibb Deitz – for visit 5.00 Nov 29 Tom Clayton – ½ - Road tax Fred 2.00 Arthur Cowan – ½ 1.25 Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 31 Will Green – ½ 2.50 Allen Parris – ½ 2.50 C. R. Jones – ½ 4.00 Arch McHan – ½ 3.00 Andy Bryson – ½ 2.50 Nov 30 Mrs. Eugene Allison – ½ 2.50 Kinney Beck – ½ 1.25 Jno. Allison – prof services self 1.00 2.00 -- incidental 1.00 1.00 Ace Deitz – for o visit 1.00 NOV totals 218.00 195.50 Dec 1 Mr. Barker – or visit 1.00 W. W. Brown – for 3 visits 3.00 Dec 2 Mrs. F. M. Alley – ½ 1.75 Charlie Coward – ½ 1.50 Dec 3 Mitchel Sutton – ½ 1.00 Dec 4 Sam Brooks – ½ 3.00 Joe Brooks – ½ 1.00 Mrs. W. H. Green – for Tub. inj 1.00 1.00 Mrs. Ellis Painter – for Tub. inj. 1.00 Chas. Mason – for Tub. inj. 1.00 -- incidental 2.00 2.00 Dec 6 S. W. Enloe – for visit 2.00 Mrs. Carl Green – for Tub. inj. 1.00 Dec 7 Edd Barnes – ½ 2.00 Son. Ry. Co. – Prof services W. C. Green 3.00 Dec 9 B. R. Morgan – ½ .50 Dec 10 Son. Ry. Co. – for visit (W.C.G.) 1.00 -- incidental 1.00 1.00 Alfred Coward Jr. – for visit & incidental 5.00 5.00 Dec 11 G. C. Crawford – ½ 2.50 Eine Smathers – ½ 2.50 Chas. Mason – for Tub. inj. 1.00 Mrs. Nichols – for removing tonsils 5.00 5.00 -- incidentals 2.00 2.00 Son. Ry. Co. – for visit (W. E. G.) 1.00 Dec 13 Cling Ashe – ½ 2.50 F. A. Luck – By cash on acct. 69.19 Grant Barid – ½ 2.50 Son. Ry. Co. (W. C. G.) 1.00 Mrs. Carl Green – for Tub. inj. 1.00 W. A. Sutton – for visit 2.00 2.00 J. M. Leatherwood – for visit 2.00 Dec 15 Son. Ry. Co. – for visit (W.E.G.) 1.00 Effie McDade – prof services for self 5.00 5.00 Dec 16 Richard Wike – Prof services for wife 15.00 15.00 Buntoa Styles – for visit & micro. Ex 5.00 Dec 17 Joe Davis, Sr. – for 2 visits 2.00 Robt. Davis – Prof services for wife 3.00 Dec 18 Ewd. Lequire – Prof services for wife 10.00 10.00 Tom Hardy – ½ 2.50 John Robinson – ½ 2.50 Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 32 Mrs. Ellis Painter – ½ & for Tub. inj. 1.00 1.00 Chas. Mason – for Tub. inj. 1.00 Son. Ry. Co. – for visit (W.C.G.) 1.00 Dec 19 Edd McNeeley – ½ 1.40 Lee Wilson – ½ 2.50 Dec 20 A. L. Beck – ½ 2.00 Geo. McConnel – ½ 1.50 Bill Jones – ½ 1.00 John Casey – for visit 3.00 3.00 -- incidental 1.00 1.00 Dec 21 Tom Brooks – ½ 5.25 Mitchel Sutton – ½ 1.50 Mrs. Sherrill – ½ 3.25 Robt. Fisher – ½ 2.50 Paul Watkins – ½ 2.50 Nelson Wilson – ½ 1.00 Mack Sheppard – ½ .50 Zeb Watson – ½ 1.00 Dec 22 Mrs. W. H. Green – for Tub. inj. 1.00 1.00 -- incidental 1.00 1.00 Dec 23 Baxter Hall – ½ 7.50 Lake Simpson – ½ .50 -- incidental 1.00 1.00 Has. Biddix – for visit 1.00 2.00 Jeater Sutton – for visit 3.00 Dec 24 Lawrence Cowan – ½ 2.50 Ed. Medford – for o visit 1.00 1.00 Dec 25 Charlie Wild – ½ .50 -- incidental ½ .25 Chas. Mason – for Tub. inj. 1.00 Mrs. A. F. Dack – for visit etc. 6.00 Dec 26 Robt. Dills – for visit 5.00 5.00 Dec 27 Dollie Sutton – for visit 3.00 3.00 John N. Rogers – for visit 10.00 -- incidental 2.00 2.00 Mrs. Carl Queen – for Tub. inj. 1.00 Dec 29 Wade Hill – for visit 1.00 M. Y. Jarrett – by cash ½ 2.50 Dec 30 Ossie Sutton – for dressing 1.00 John Moody – for visit Jerry 10.00 10.00 Robt. Garrett – for visit 1.50 Enock Jimison – for visit 1.50 Dec 31 Jno. Green – ½ 1.50 Mrs. Nichols – for prof services self 2.00 5.00 Mrs. J. G. Hall – for o visit 1.00 -- incidental 2.00 2.00 YEAR END TOTAL 2241.00 3115.00 On an end page was this writing: Cash Work 2241.00 CZC 3115.00 CZC 1852.00 2400.00 DDH 4093.0 5515.00 Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 33 Descendants of John Thomas Tatham ED: This family record was submitted by JCGS member, Mary Buchanan Smith. It will continue in following issues. 56. Lillie Nora Tatham She was born 22 Apr 1869 in Jackson Co., NC and died 31 Jan 1955 in Jackson Co., NC. She is buried Wesleyanna Methodist Church Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. She married John Simon Buchanan, 24 Mar 1884 in Jackson Co., NC. He was the son of William H. Buchanan and Elvira Emeline Brooks. He was born 11 Nov 1863 in Jackson Co., NC and died 19 Mar 1940 in Jackson Co., NC. He is buried Wesleyanna Methodist Church Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. Notes for Lillie Tatham and John Buchanan: 1900 Census, Savannah Township, Jackson Co., NC 1910 Census, Savannah, Jackson Co., NC John Buchanan 36 M, 16 yrs. Farmer John Buchanan 46 M, 26 yrs. Lillie 31 5 children, 4 living Lillie 41 10 child, 9 living Mattie 14 Garland 19 Garland 8 Candler 16 Candler 5 Jef 12 Jefferson 1 Harley 9 Maude 4 1920 Census, Savannah, Jackson Co., NC May 4 John S. Buchanan 57 general farming Julia 2 Lillie N. 50 sales woman, grocery store Robert G. 1 Jeff J. 21 Thomas Tatham 72 father in law Harley 18 May 14 1930 Census, Savannah, Jackson Co., NC Maude 14 John Buchanan 66 Julie L. 12 Lillie 61 Robert G. 11 Julia 23 Grady 21 Children of Lillie Tatham and John Buchanan are: i. Claude Buchanan He was born 8 Jun 1889 in Jackson Co., NC and died 20 Jun (????). He married Dot Moore 22 Feb 1958 in Walhalla, Oconee Co., SC. 148. ii. Thomas Garland Buchanan He was born 3 Dec 1890 in Savannah community, Jackson Co., NC and died 30 Dec 1964 in Savannah Community, Jackson Co., NC. He is buried Wesleyanna Methodist Church Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. He married Eva Anderson 23 Nov. 1911. 149. iii. Pinkney Candler Buchanan He was born 20 Aug 1893 in Savannah community, Jackson Co., NC and died 11 May 1929 in Savannah community, Jackson Co., NC. iv. Mattie Amy Buchanan She was born 22 Jan 1896 in Savannah community, Jackson Co., NC and died 2 Apr 1983, in Jackson Co., NC. She is buried Wesleyanna Methodist Church Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. She married Harley G. Cabe 1915. Notes for Mattie Buchanan and Harley Cabe: 1920 Census, Haywood Co, NC Harley G. Cabe 31 m, 5 yrs Mattie 23 150. v. John Jefferson Buchanan He was born 31 Jun 1898 in Jackson Co., NC, and died 14 Jan 1957 in Jackson Co., NC. He is buried in Stephens Cemetery, Moses Creek Baptist Church, Jackson Co., NC. He married Mary Jane Hooper, 27 Apr 1922. 151. vi. William Harley Buchanan He was born 29 Dec 1900 in Savannah community, Jackson Co., NC and died Apr 1967 in Sylva, Jackson Co., NC. He is buried n Loves Chapel Methodist Church Cemetery, Sylva, Jackson Co., NC. He married Mary Etta Cabe 10 Jun 1921 in Jackson Co., NC. Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 34 152. vii. Artie Mae Buchanan She was born 18 Aug 1905 in Jackson Co., NC and died 27 Jun 1984 in Jackson Co., NC. She is buried in Fairview Memorial Gardens, Sylva, Jackson Co., NC. She married David Wesley Sutton 11 Oct 1924 in Jackson Co., NC. 153. viii. Maude Elvira Buchanan She was born 18 Aug 1905 in Jackson Co., NC and died 3 Jan 1977 in Jackson Co., NC. She is buried Old Savannah Baptist Church Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. She married Elcie G. Sutton 1923. ix. Julie Lee Buchanan She was born 3 May 1907 in Jackson Co., NC and died 1996 in Jackson Co., NC. She is buried in Wesleyanna Methodist Church Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. 154. x. Robert Grady Buchanan He was born 30 Jul 1908 in Jackson Co., NC and died 23 Jun 1987 in Jackson Co., NC. He is buried in Greens Creek Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. 57. James Robert Tatham He was born 18 Feb 1871 in Jackson Co. NC and died 17 Feb 1932 in Darrington, Washington. He is buried in Darrington Cemetery, Snohomish Co., Washington. He married Adeline Cabe, 11 Nov 1893 in Savannah, Jackson Co., NC. She was the daughter of John W. Cabe and Delpha Rotine Cochran. She was born 1877 in Jackson Co., NC and died 28 Jul 1967 in Darrington, Washington. She is buried in Darrington Cemetery, Snohomish Co., Washington. Notes for James Tatham and Adeline Cabe: 1900 Census, Savannah Township, Jackson Co., NC 1900 Census, Webster Township, Jackson Co., NC Robert Tatham 29 m, 6yrs Sawmill engineer James R. Tatham 37 m, 16 yrs. Copper Mining Adeline 33 3 child. 3 living Adeline 33 6 child. 6 living Minnie 5 Minnie 15 Thomas 3 Thomas 13 Ivey 5/12 Ivy 10 Clinton 7 Oda 4 Claude 9/12 Children of James Tatham and Adeline Cabe are: 155. i. Minnie Tatham She was born 22 Jan 1895 Savannah, Jackson Co., NC and died 17 Sep 1913 in Jackson Co., NC. ii. Thomas Tatham He was born 10 Mar 1897 in Jackson Co., NC and died 30 Aug 1981 in Darrington, Washington. He is buried in Darrington, Washington. iii. Lillie Ivory Tatham She was born 27 Dec 1899. iv. Clinton Tatham He was born 19 Jan 1903 and died 29 Feb 1920. 156. v. Oda Tatham She was born 29 Apr 1905 and died 10 Sep 1982 in Centralia, Washington. vi. Claude Tatham He was born 22 Jul 1909 and died 4 Apr 1912. vii. James Clyde Tatham He was born 23 Sep 1912 and died 22 Nov 1993. 58. Pinknery Candler Tatham He was born 24 Jun 1874 Savannah, Jackson Co., NC and died Aug 1923. Burial in Sedro-Wooley Cemetery, Washington. He married Birdell Stillwell, daughter of John Stillwell and Sarah J. She was born 18 Feb 1876 and died 18 Jun 1919 in Jackson Co., NC. She is buried in Stillwell Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. Notes for Pinknery Candler Tatham: Pinknery had a daughter by Callie Jones, who married Coot Turpin. Their daughter was Birdie Jones. Birdie married an Allman. Child of Pinknery Tatham and Birdell Stillwell is: i. Claude D. Tatham He was born 29 Ma 1909 and died 9 Apr 1961. He is buried Sedro-Wooley, Washington. 59. Daniel Harley Tatham He was born 23 Jul 1880 in Savannah, Jackson Co., NC and died 29 Jun 1951. He married Nora Whitley. Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 35 Notes for Daniel Tatham: 1910 Census, Skagit, McMurray, Washington Daniel Tatham 39 b. NC Chaser (Closer) Logging Camp out of work 8 weeks in 1909. Child of Daniel Tatham and Nora Whitely is: i. Lyle Tatham 60. William Charles Tatham He was born 22 Sep 1881 Savannah, Jackson Co., NC and died 3 May 1967 Young Harris, Towns Co., GA. He is buried Wood’s Grove Baptist Church Cemetery, Towns Co., GA. He married Lola Vester Gribble 5 Nov 1899 in Savannah, Jackson Co., NC. She was the daughter of William B. Gribble and Nancy Talitha Deitz. She was bon 22 Sep 1881 in Jackson Co., NC and died 19 Aug 1958. Notes for William Tatham and Lola Gribble: 1920 Census, Hiawassee Dist., Towns Co., GA William C. Tatham 40 b. NC parents b. NC Lola 37 Glenn 17 Bertha 16 Bessie 12 Ester 10 Carrie 8 Jessie 6 Children of William Tatham and Lola Gribble: i. William Claude Tatham He was born 26 Aug 1900 in Jackson Co., NC and died 11 Aug 1902 in Jackson Co., NC. He is buried Wesleyanna Methodist Church Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. 157. ii. Glenn Thomas Tatham He was born 19 Mar 1902 in Jackson Co., NC. He married Pearl Katherine Hall. 23 Jun 1921. 158. iii. Berta Lee Tatham She was born 17 Oct 1904 in Towns Co., GA. She marred R. B. Swanson, 20 Jun 1920 in Hayesville, NC. 159. iv. Bessie Ann Tatham She was born 4 Mar 1907 n Towns Co., GA. She married William C. Cloer, 6 Apr 1923 in Towns Co., GA. 160. v. Ester Lillie Tatham She was born 16 Apr 1909 n Franklin, Macon Co., NC. She married William C. Cloer, 6 Apr 1923 in Towns Co., GA. 161. vi. Carrie Odessie Tatham She was born 2 Nov 1911 in Towns Co., GA. 162. vii. Jessie Ellenora Tatham She was born 4 Aug 1913 in Towns Co., GA. viii. Charles Cline Tatham He was born 23 Sep 1918 and died 22 Dec 1918 in Young Harris, Towns Co., GA. 61. John Wesley Tatham He was born 28 Feb 1882 in Savannah, Jackson Co., NC and died 1945 in Darrington, Washington. He is buried in Darrington Cemetery, Snohomish Co., Washington. He married Hattie Mansur. Notes for John Tatham: WWII Draft Card – lived in Darrington, Snohomish Co., Washington. Worked at Sauk Lumber Co., Darrington. 1920 Darrington, Snohomish, Washington John Tatham, 38, Boarder, Logger in logging camp. Child of John Tatham and Hattie Mansur is: 163. i. John Wesley Tatham, Jr. Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 36 62. Martha Ann Tatham She was born 11 Mar 1867 in Savannah, Jackson Co., NC and died 1 Nov 1927 in Jackson Co., NC. She married Rufus Thomas Gribble, 16 Mar 1884 in Savannah, Jackson Co., NC. He was the son of John Gribble and Racheal Wilson. He was born 9 Apr 1859 in Jackson Co., NC and died 6 Sep 1942 in Jackson Co., NC. He is buried Wesleyanna Methodist Church Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. Notes for Martha Tatham and Rufus Gribble: 1910 Census, Savannah, Jackson Co., NC 1920 Census, Savannah, Jackson Co., NC Rufus P. Gribble 51 m. 27 yrs Rufus Gribble 68 widower Ann 45 8 child, 7 living Wilburn 33 son Carrie 20 Irene 21 daughter David 17 Wilbern 14 Veler 8 Mary 5 Irene 2 Children of Martha Tatham and Rufus Gribble are: 164. i. Effie Gribble ii. Carrie Gribble She was born 28 Sep 1888 Jackson Co., NC and died 23 Nov 1929 in Jackson Co., NC. She is buried Wesleyanna Methodist Church Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. (Her tombstone says wife of Rufus Buchanan) 165. iii. Rufus Wilburn Gribble He was born 30 Jan 1897 in Jackson Co., NC and died 11 Aug 1950 in Jackson Co., NC. He is buried in East Fork Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. iv. David Gribble He was born 10 Apr 1898 and died 23 Feb 1919. 166. v. Velda Margaret Grbble She was born 18 Sep 1900 in Jackson Co., NC and died 10 Dec 1965 in Savannah community, Jackson Co., NC. She is buried Fairview Memorial Gardens, Jackson Co., NC. 167. vi. Mary Ellen Gribble she was born 26 Apr 1905 in Jackson Co., NC. 168. vii. Lidia Irene Gribble She was born 30 Mar 1908 in Jackson Co., NC and died 9 Mar 1976 in Jackson Co., NC. She is buried Old Savannah Baptist Church Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. 63. Sarah Jane Tatham She was born 1 Jul 1873 in Savannah, Jackson Co., NC and died 8 May 1952 in Jackson Co., NC. She is buried East Fork Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. She married James Theodore Bryson 7 Feb 1892 in Jackson Co., NC. He was the son of William Hamilton Bryson and Agnes Matilda Wilson. He was born 10 Dec 1870 in Jackson Co., NC and died 16 Apr 1961 in Jackson Co., NC. He is buried East Fork Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. Notes for Sarah Tatham and James Bryson: 1900 Census, Jackson Co., NC, married 8 years Children of Sarah Tatham and James Bryson are: 169. i. Mamie Elnora Bryson She was born 10 Apr 1893 in Jackson Co., NC and died 20 Aug 1955 in Jackson Co., NC. She is buried East Fork Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. 170. ii. Carrie Bryson She was born 1902 in Jackson Co., NC. 171 iii. David Hamilton Bryson He was born 19 Jan 1904 in Jackson Co., NC and died 10 Aug 1990 in Jackson Co., NC. He is buried East Fork Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. 172. iv. James Frank Bryson He was born 20 May 1907 in Jackson Co., NC and died 20 Oct 1986 in Jackson Co., NC. He is buried East Fork Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. He married Stella Cowan 7 Mar 1930. Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 37 William J. ‘Billy’ Parker, Caney Fork Confederate Soldier (1845-1915) The following article was sent by JCGS member, Daniel Johnson for publication in this issue of JTJ. Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 38 Billy Parker was the firstborn son of John A. Parker, and his second wife, Nancy Phillips.1 John married Nancy on 18 November 18442 in (what was then, still) Haywood county. Billy followed less than 3 months later being born on 18 February 18453 in Caney Fork. Although Billy was the firstborn in his family, it is likely that he didn’t enjoy the typical privileges of a firstborn, given that there were at least five of his eight older half brothers and sisters growing up with him4: *Jane Parker, b. 1824 *Lavinia Parker, b. 1827 *Pleasant Parker, b. 18295 *Q.A. Parker, b. 1829 *John P. Parker, b. 1831 *Mary Parker, b. 1835 *Jefferson Davis Parker, b. 1837 *Elizabeth Tabitha Parker, b. 1840 When the ‘Great War of Northern Aggression’ exploded officially on April 12, 1861, Billy was 16 years old. However, when the recruiters came around in August of that same year, he had become an 18 year old, thus qualifying for service.6 This strong desire to defend his homeland is thus evidenced in having changed his age, in order to join the Confederate forces. He was mustered into Company F, of the 29th NC Infantry unit on August 31, 18617, made up of young men from Buncombe, Cherokee, Haywood, Jackson, Mitchell, and Yancey counties. His years of service were quite eventful. On October 10th, 1864 in the Battle of Allatoona, (Bartow county, Georgia) an especially bloody battle where almost half of both Federal and Confederate forces died8, Billy was wounded.9 The battle resulted in a Federal victory: “Maj. Gen. Samuel G. French’s Confederate division arrived near Allatoona at sunrise on the 5th. After demanding a surrender and receiving a negative reply, French attacked. The Union outer line survived a sustained two and a half hour attack, but then fell back and regrouped in an earthen “Star” fort of Allatoona Pass. French repeatedly attacked, but the fort held. The Rebels began to run out of ammunition, and reports of arriving Union reinforcements influenced them to move off and rejoin Hood’s force.”10 He was able to nurse his wounds, and recover to the point of continuing to serve. On December 15-16th, the Battle of Nashville was fought, and ended as well with a Federal victory. General George Thomas summarizes some of the Confederate losses: “During the two days' operations there were 4,462 prisoners captured, including 287 officers of all grades from that of major-general, 53 pieces of artillery, and thousands of small-arms. The enemy abandoned on the field all his dead and wounded.”11 Billy was one of those prisoners captured and hospitalized, having been wounded again in the fighting.12 He was also promoted to sergeant, apparently during the battle.13 After about 6 weeks of recovery, he was transferred to the POW camp in Louisville, KY on January 27th, 1865. On February 3rd of this same year, he was again transferred, this time to Camp Chase POW camp in Columbus, OH.14 There he was to wait out the remaining four months of the war until his oath of allegiance on June 13th , 186515: “As the war wore on, conditions (in Camp Chase) became worse. Shoddy barracks, low muddy ground, open latrines, aboveground open cisterns, and a brief smallpox outbreak excited U.S. Sanitary Commission agents who were already demanding reform. Original facilities for 3,500-4,000 men were jammed with close to 7,000…crowding and health conditions were never resolved. As many as 10,000 prisoners were reputedly confined there by the time of the Confederate surrender.”16 When the war was over, as so many others, Billy returned home a broken man, suffering from wounds that would afflict him for the rest of his life. His first petition for a pension was submitted on 1911; however it was rejected and he was forced to resubmit it a year later in July of 1912: SOLDIER'S APPLICATION FOR PENSION State of NC co. of Jackson, Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 39 On this 1st day of July A.D. 1912, personally appeared before me,___________ C.S.C. in and for the state and co. aforesaid, W.J. Parker, age 67 years and a resident at Whittier post office, in said co. and state, and who, being duly sworn, makes the following declaration in order to obtain the pension under the provisions of an act entitled "An act for the relief of certain Confederate Soldiers, Sailors and Widows" ratified March 8, 1907; that he is the identical W.J. Parker who enlisted in Co. F, 29 Reg., NC State Troops on or about the 31st day of Aug 1861 to serve in the armies of the late Confederate States, and that while in said service at Altonna Heights, Georgia and Nashville, Tenn about Dec or Jan 1865, he received a wound or wounds, etc. (Applicant will here state the nature and extent of his wounds and disability, so that a proper classification can be made under the new Pension Law passed by the General Assembly of 1907. Read said section of said law carefully and to accomplish the classification therein called for let statement here as to nature and extent of wounds, etc. be very full and explicit.) First wound shot through the body Second " shot in the head He further states that he is and has been for twelve months immediately preceding this Application for pension, a bona fide resident of NC; that he holds no office under the United States or under any State or co. from which he is receiving the sum of three hundred dollars as fees or as salary annually; that he is not worth in his own right, or the right of his wife, property at its assessed value for taxation to the amount of five hundred dollars ($500) nor has he disposed of property of such value by figt or voluntary conveyance since the 11th of March 1885, and that he is not receiving any aid from the state of NC or under any other statute providing for the relief of the maimed and blind soldiers of the state. Sworn and subscribed to before me this 6 day of July, 1912 J.P. Sherrill W.J. Parker Signature of J.P. Signature of applicant Also personally appeared before me W.A. Eular who resides at Dillsboro post office, in said co. and state a person whom I know to be respectable and entitled to credit, and being by me duly sworn, says he is acquainted with W.J. Parker, the applicant for pension, and has every reason to believe that he is the identical person he represents himself to be, and that the facts set forth in this affidavit are correct to the best of his knowledge and belief, and that he has no interest, direct or indirect, in this claim. W.A. Eular Also appeared before me J.H. Teague a physician in good standing in said co. and state, and being duly sworn, says that he has carefully and thoroughly examined W.J. Parker, the applicant for pension and finds wuch disability for manual labor as is described below by reason of wounds received while in the discharge of his duty as a soldier or sailor of NC in the service of the late Confederate states. (Let physician here give full and explicit professional information as to the nature and extent of wounds, disability, stating particularly whether disability amounts to three-fourths or not, in order to accomplish the classification called for under the new Pension Law by the General Assembly of 1907) I find the above applicant to be suffering with some __________ of lungs _____ _____ ______ as caused by a gun shot wound ________ _________the lungs causing terrible ________ disables him duly _____from doing regular manual labor. Sworn and Subscribed to before me, this 6th of July 1912 J.H. Teague M.D.17 This time accompanied by this clarification: Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 40 Webster, NC July 22nd, 1912 State Pension Board Raleigh, NC Gentleman If you will refer to your files for last year you will see we had some corrispondence as to Wm. Parker. You turned him down on the grounds that the Dr. certificate only read 2/3 disability. I know of my own knowledge that the Dr. last year intended to write 3/4 disability and he had good and sufficient causes to pass upon the disabilities of Mr. Parker in his ___________ As I have previously stated there were no better solidiers than Parker. You can see from his application that he received some very serious wounds. I hope you will allow this man a pension and place him on the rolls. Your truly M.D. Cowan, C.S.C. Sworn and subscribed to before me this 22 day of July 1911 M.D. Cowan Wm. Self Sgnature of Physician18 However, in spite of his war wounds and the trauma of the whole experience, he got on with his life. He married C. Jane Chastain ca 1868, a descendent of Dr. Pierre Chastain, a French Huguenot fleeing from religious persecution who arrived with his family in James River, VA in 1700.19 Billy and Jane raised their family in Caney Fork, which consisted of the following children: Samantha J. Parker, b. 3 Mar 1869 Sarah ‘Alice’ Parker, b. 22 Sep 1871 Arilla Elizabeth Parker, b. 13 Oct 1875 Erastus Sylvester Parker, b. 27 Aug 1876 Andrew T. Parker, b. Jul 1878 Alfred Miles Parker, b. Jul 1880 Maude Parker, b. ca. 1886 Jesse Oscar Parker, b. 16 Jun 1887 According to Zinnie Hooper Willis20, Billy Parker was half Cherokee. An oft-repeated story among many western North Carolina families is that of a Cherokee grandmother; many of these rumors likely being true. However proving and documenting this fact for many is unlikely. If Billy Parker were indeed half Cherokee, that would likely mean that either his father, John A. Parker, or his mother, Nancy Phillips, was a full-blood. To date, there is no documentation to prove this for either one of them. Were Billy one quarter Cherokee, (a more likely possibility) that would mean one of his grandparents was full-blood. Were that the case, the only possibilities are the following: William Parker Sr. Elizabeth (Pleasant?) Daniel Phillips Ruth/a (Farris/ies?) Daniel and Ruth Phillips migrated from SC at some point before 1830.21 It is thought that they came from 96 District, which included the present day counties of Oconee and Pickens, and which were in fact, part of Cherokee territory. There are family ties in this area to this day, stretching from about two centuries ago. However to date, this author has not encountered the typical ‘Cherokee rumor’ stories among descendants that could be attributed to this couple. It is interesting to note the time frame though: they moved directly to Caney Fork, which was somewhat of a refuge for those trying to avoid the Indian Removal Act, and the resulting Trail of Tears march in 1838.22 Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 41 William Parker and his wife Elizabeth seem more likely candidates; Elizabeth’s elusive identity seems to lend more credibility to her being the Cherokee of which some of her descendants speak. Another possibility is that two or more of Billy’s grandparents were part Cherokee, adding up to him being half. For example if each of his grandparents were ¼ , that would add up to Billy being ½. But, this is an area of ongoing research, and hopefully at some point in the future Parker researchers will be able to uncover some documentation. Billy Parker lived his last years as a widower in Qualla, Jackson county.23 Jane having died in 1894.24 He is said to have been a basket weaver25. Being right on the border of the reservation, these interesting notes also add to the intrigue of a possible Cherokee connection. His health was probably never very good, and it can be attested by a report in the Jackson County Journal: “Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Cook went to Soco last week to see Mrs. Cook's father, who is seriously ill."26 This visit could possibly have been Alice’s last time to see her father. Billy’s oldest daughter, Samantha Wood, and her family had already moved to Washington state by this time27 but the rest of the children were still living in the area. A 50th reunion celebration for Confederate veterans was held on the county courthouse grounds on September 18th, 1915 with a special monument being dedicated and a picture taken of all veterans present.28 However, as a sad final note, Billy had passed away just a month earlier29, missing out on what surely would have been a proud and meaningful moment for him and his military years. End Notes: 1 Journeys through Jackson, Vol. XVII, No. 1, Winter 2007, pgs. 27-34 2”Neath Western’s Sod,” compiled by Howard R. Seymours Jr., p 68. 3Tombstone, Lower Coward cemetery, Caney Fork, Jackson County, NC. It should come as no surprise that Nancy was obviously pregnant (6 months) with Billy when they married. This author has come across the same circumstance several times in Caney Fork, where the law was far away, and traditional moral values were easily compromised. In fact, it has been assumed that John A. Parker’s first wife died, but there has been no record found neither of her name, nor of her death date. Had she died, one questions why John waited so long to marry Nancy, especially considering that he was a widower with 8 children to feed? The likely answer is that Nancy, (she and her family apparently from SC) and having moved to Caney Fork ca. , moved in with John to help with the children, became pregnant, and they simply put off marriage until a convenient time. 41850 Haywood county, NC census: household 807; those who appear on this census are: P.M. Parker, 20, Q.A. Parker, 20, John Parker, 19, Mary Parker, 16, Elizabeth Parker, 10. Jane and Lavinia both had apparently already married when the census was taken, and Jefferson Davis is assumed to have died. 5It appears that Pleasant and Q.A. (or ‘Hugh’: this writer theorizes that Q.A. and Hugh were the same person) were twins. It has been theorized but never documented, that John A. Parker’s mother was Elizabeth Pleasant. Given the typical naming customs of this day, the existence of ‘Pleasant Parker’ lends credibility to this theory 6“NC Troops 1861-65, A Roster, Vol VIII” 7Ibid 8www.cr.nps.gov/hps/abpp/battles/ga023.htm 9“NC Troops 1861-65, A Roster, Vol VIII” 10www.cr.nps.gov/hps/abpp/battles/ga023.htm 11www.civilwarhome.com/thomasnash.htm; the Union forces numbered some 49,000, and the Confederates, 31,000. Deaths: Union: 2,900; Confederates; app. 13,000 12 “NC Troops 1861-65, A Roster, Vol VIII” 13Ibid 14Ibid 15Ibid 16 www.civilwarhome.com/campchase.htm Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 42 17Application for State of North Carolina Pension 18Application for State of North Carolina Pension 19Two Ships to Virginia, "Huguenot Refugees to Virginia 1700" Mary & Ann, 12 August 1700. "Pierre Chastain, a femme et cinq enfante." Orem, UT: Ancestry, Inc., 1999 20Personal interview, 2 July 2003. Zinnie is one of Billy’s great-grandchildren. 211830 Haywood county, NC census 22Linda Hoxit Raxter, Jackson county historian 231910 Jackson county, NC census: district 91, household 110 24 “The Cemeteries of Jackson co., NC,” p 57. Published in 1998 by the Jackson Co. Genealogical Society 25Personal interview, Zinnie Hooper Willis. 26Jackson Co. Journal, July 30, 1915, microfilm #Sy-JCN 3. Hunter Library, WCU, Cullowhee, NC 271910 Skagit co., WA census; p 8B, household #71, town of Hamilton 28www.thomaslegion.net/pictures.html 29Tombstone Oldie, But Goodie This is a picture taken at the old Wolf Creek Baptist Church in the Little Canada section of Jackson County. We are not sure when this picture was taken. If anyone knows, please feel free to let us know. Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 43 First Year Articles All year long we will be reprinting articles from the first year of JCGS. Lean back, enjoy and remember. Journeys Through Jackson – 91-1 JCGS Interview with Mrs. Minnie Lee Harris Alexander June 6, 1991 Mrs. Alexander, a cheerful, friendly lady of more than 100 years, was tickled to have a visitor. The road to her daughter’s home was lined with rhododendron and other flowers, all in full bloom, and she commented that it was always pretty when the flowers bloomed. Mrs. Alexander was born in Rutherford County, date unknown. Her parents were Columbus and Rachel Scruggs Harris; Rachel was the daughter of Dickson and Selena Hawkins Scruggs. After Columbus died, Rachel and Minnie came to Jackson County in a covered wagon. Minnie had brothers Richard, Felix, and Marion, and a sister, Susan, all of whom stayed in Rutherford County. There may have been other siblings, she isn’t sure. Rachel married Javan Parker, date and place unknown; she died April 10, 1920, and is buried at Sol’s Creek. Minnie Harris married Jut Carey Alexander on August 8, 1910, with the ceremony performed by Rev. J. H. Owen at the home of her mother. They had four children: Rachel (10-7-1911); Tolvin Raymond (9-30-1914); Willie Amanda (11-6-1919); and Margaret (9-14-1924), with whom she makes her home. Rachel married Allen Hoxit and lives in Transylvania County; Willie married Shirley Mathis and lives in Sylva; Tolvin married Zula Nicholson and, after her death, Jo Parker, and they live at Tuckasegee; and Margaret married Eldon Mathis and lives in Little Canada. When asked how many grandchildren she had, Mrs. Alexander laughed heartily and said, “Lots!” There are great-great-great grandchildren, but many of them live away. Jut Carey Alexander died in 1962 and is buried in the Sol’s Creek Baptist Church Cemetery, where the Alexanders have been members for many, many years. Although Mrs. Alexander is hard of hearing, she has a keen mind and enjoys life. She laughs frequently and always has a smile on her face. She remembers living in a “boxed-up house” and snow blowing in through the cracks in the walls. Cooking was done on the fireplace. She went to school a little bit, not much, because “I didn’t want to learn.” One of her favorite activities was chasing the boys around the schoolhouse to kiss them, and she referred specifically to Sterling Melton, a well-known minister in Jackson County, who was “a little boy” when she was “a great big girl.” She moved away and worked in a cotton mill for a while, but came back and has lived in Canada ever since. Mrs. Alexander has been in pretty good health all her life. She used snuff until just a few years ago when a doctor made her quit because of mouth cancer. She had her appendix out four or five years ago and in March of 1991 was in the hospital with pneumonia. On the day she came home, she found that family members had been digging ramps, and she had to have some to eat, right then. When asked if she liked ramps, a big grin came on her face and she said, “Lord, yes, I like them!” She likes corn bread (if it’s fixed right), biscuits, poke sallet – a little of everything. She always had a garden and grew her own food. When asked if she liked chocolate cake, she replied, “Yes, but I like plain cake best.” She made quilts to sell, sewing them by hand. (“I never had a sewing machine.”), and did all the chores associated with a mountain woman’s life. All her children were born at home. When asked about special events, she told about going camping. She said “We’d take our rations and go way out in the mountains over on Charlie’s Creek. We went one time and I fell down and like to killed myself. But I like to go camping.” Her last camping trip was July 4, 1990, and she had a good time. Mrs. Alexander keeps a cow bell on the arm of her chair so when Margaret is in the garden, she can ring it and Margaret will hear. Mrs. Alexander’s comment to that: “Pretty sensible, ain’t it?” She lived alone until just a few years ago, with a grandchild going in to spend the night. But now she lives with Margaret and Eldon, she and her stuffed animals and her cowbell and her joy of living. As the visitor left, Mrs. Alexander shook her hand and asked her to come back and visit again. Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 44 Update The Sylva Herald published Minnie’s obituary in February of 1995. Minnie Alexander Dies Feb. 7 at 115 Known as possibly the oldest person in the state, Minnie Harris Alexander, 115, of the Canada community, died Tuesday, Feb. 7, at Mountain Trace Nursing Home in Sylva. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. Friday, Feb. 10, at Sols Creek Baptist Church, where she was a member. The Rev. L. H. Mathis officiated. Burial was in the church cemetery. A native of Rutherford County, she had lived in Jackson County for the past 103 years. She was the daughter of the late Columbus and Rachel Scruggs Harris and the wife of the late Jutt Carey Alexander, who died in 1961. Alexander came to Jackson County at the age of nine with her mother and brother, Felix, in a covered wagon after her father died in South Carolina. She married Jutt Alexander Aug. 10, 1910, at the age of 30, and the couple had four children all of whom survive her. Up until she was 100 years old, Alexander kept a home of her own in Canada community. At that time she moved in with her daughter Margaret and her husband, Eldon. She did not move to Mountain Trace until she was 113. Through the yeas many people, including her own doctor, questioned Alexander on just what it was that kept her going. She never answered straight out what she thought it was, but she did describe a few of her rituals, including fried eggs, gravy and biscuits and coffee for breakfast and dipping snuff for almost 100 years. But it was her laughter and her smile that most, including many family members, truly believe is the reason Alexander lived as long as she did. “She always seemed young to us,” her son, Tolvin, told the Herald at his mother’s 115th birthday celebration last August. “Whenever we were kids she’d some outside and play with us.” Alexander’s birthday celebration became annual events for the people of Canada community for many years. It was held on the fourth Sunday in August to coincide with the annual decoration at Sols Creek Cemetery, where her husband, mother, stepfather and now she are all buried. Surviving Alexander are her children – one son, Tolvin Alexander of Tuckasegee; three daughters, Rachel Hoxit of Penrose. Willie Mathis of Sylva and Margaret Mathis of Tuckasegee; and 21 grandchildren, 46 great grandchildren, 47 great-great grandchildren and two great-great-great grandchildren. To end the funeral service a Sols Creek, Reverend Mathis read the following poem written by Minnie’s granddaughter Sheila A. Coggins the night after her passing: Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 45 Minnie Alexander 1879-1995 In 1879 “little granny” was born No record of night, noon, or morn Yet 115 years later on a February eve This earthly home she did leave. Little granny married in 1910 Grandpa Jutt, special to her of all men Four children they then did raise A small family during those days. There’s Rachel, the oldest of all Followed by Tolvin, the only son you recall Then Willie and Margaret, the younger two What a fine family for them to do. Little granny saw a lot of changes in her life Like everyone else, she saw trouble and strife. Yet she kept a spirit, oh so sweet Displaying it to all that she did meet Last August she had a birthday party, oh so grand She was visited by many across the land Governor Hunt, Maggie Lauterer to name one or two Lots of regulars like me and like you. So don’t cry because she is gone Because in our hearts she will live on and on She’s home where she wanted to be Waiting to be joined by you and by me. The picture of Minnie was shared with JTJ by one of her many great granddaughters, Penny Luker Postell. Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 46 If any member, past or present would like to share what the Jackson County Genealogical Society means to them, feel free to do so and in a future issue this anniversary year, they will be published. It could be anything; how the Society has helped with your research, or how it has helped you find that illusive ancestor, or connect with family that you didn’t know you had. Our Society has grown by leaps and bounds over the last 25 years and with the continued support of our members and the community, we will continue to grow. We have expanded our research materials; established three scholarship awards; published prize winning publications and books; have had members and the society itself awarded prestigious awards; our monthly programs have grown to cover varied and interesting topics; have successfully moved into the historic courthouse in Sylva, and each and every year seen our membership grow in numbers and in participation in the society. Great things are in store for our society. Feel free to drop by and use our resources, or even just to chat. Any ideas for articles for JTJ will be appreciated. Always remember, our society is as great as it is by the work of the members and that we can work together to make it bigger and better. Remember that this is our 25th Anniversary Year! Stay in touch for events and information all year long. Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 47 Index Abernathy 21 Adams 9 Ahl 10 Alexander 8, 22, 43, 44, 45 Allen 11, 23 Alley 10, 31 Allison 9, 10, 31 Allman 10, 21 Ammons 9, 21 Anderson 33 Arrington 11 Arrowood 11 Ashe 11, 21, 22, 23, 28, 31 Bailey 11 Baird 31 Banther 23 Barker 11 Barnes 31 Barton 9 Battle 22 Beasley 11, 23, 29 Beck 7, 9, 10, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32 Belue 25 Benson 9 Berry 11 Biddix 32 Bishop 26 Black 10, 11 Blaine 10 Blanton 5, 10, 11, 13, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20 Bobo 10 Borgia 25 Bradburn 10 Bradley 9, 10, 23 Bradshaw 9 Brendle 11 Briscoe 9 Brock 21 Brooks 9, 10, 11, 31, 32, 33 Broom 22 Brown 6, 9, 12, 27, 31 Brown 9 Bryson 7, 9, 10, 11 13, 21, 30, 31, 36 Buchanan 5, 9, 10, 11, 22, 28, 29, 33, 34, 36 Bumgarner 7, 9, 21, 23 Bures 21 Burrell 12, 28 Burston 21 Byers 19 Cabe 10, 11, 28, 29, 33, 34 Cable 7, 10, 11 Cagle 21, 29 Caldwell 10 Caler 10 Campbell 10 Cannon 10 Cantrell 11 Carson 10, 23 Carver 12, 22 Casey 32 Cathey 10, 30 Chastain 40 Cheney 9 Choat 27 Clark 10 Clayton 7, 10, 14, 30 Clements 10 Cloer 35 Cochran 7, 23, 34 Cocke 17 Cockerham 7, 10, 11 Cockran 10 Coggins 4, 22, 44 Cole 11 Collins 10 Colville 10 Conley 10, 25 Conner 10, 21 Cook 13, 41 Cooksey 26 Cooper 7, 9 Copeland 17 Corbin 11 Corr 26 Countryman 11 Cowan 7, 9, 10, 21, 32, 36 Coward 9, 11, 19, 31 Crawford 31 Crawford 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 14, 16, 21, 28, 31 Crisp 21 Cucumber 22 Culbertson 11 Cunningham 11, 22 Cutheberson 30 Dack 32 Dalton 21 Davis 7, 9, 10, 30, 31 Dean 10 DeHart 11 Deitz 7, 10, 11, 22, 30, 31, 35 Dillard 10, 11 Dills 7, 9, 11, 23, 24, 32 Dooley 10 Dorsey 21 Dugan 22 Dunkins 22 Edwards 10 Elam 10 Elders 23 Eldridge 22 Eller 11 Elliot 21 Enloe 10, 29, 30, 31 Ensley 7, 10, 11, 15, 30 Erfurt 11 Eular 39 Extine 10, 14 Fain 21 Farley 30 Farmer 11 Farmer 21 Farmer 27 Farris 40 Fields 11 Fisher 11 Fisher 11 Fisher 9, 13, 29, 3 Fowler 9 French 38 Frizzell 7, 9, 10 Fugate 11 Fulbright 29 Galloway 9 Gardner 10 Garren 26 Garrett 32 Gibson 10, 23 Gillon 11 Godwin 17, 18 Golden 22 Goodman 18 Green 9, 10, 11, 12, 22, 29, 30, 31, 32 Gregory 24 Gribble10, 35, 36 Gunter 11, 23 Gustafson 10 Hall 10, 15, 21, 22, 30, 32, 35 Hamilton 21 Hamrick 19 Hanna 10 Hardy 31 Harmon 26, 27 Harrett 10 Harrill 18 Harris 8, 10, 11, 43, 44 Haskett 10 Hawkins 43 Hays 25 Hemphill 10 Henderson 9, 10 Henry 9, 16, 27 Hensley 22 Henson 10, 11, 23, 30 Hicks 23 Higdon 10, 11, 30 Hill 32 Hines 27 Hinshaw 10 Hipps 22 Hoffman 11 Holcombe 10 Holland 22 Hollingsworth 26 Homer 17 Honeycutt 10, 16 Hooper 4, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 21, 33, 40, 42 Hornbuckle 22 Houston 9 Howell 9, 22 Hoxit 42, 43, 44 Hoyle 11 Hoyles 16 Hudson 11 Huffman 11 Huggins 25 Humphrey 16 Hunnicutt 10 Hyatt 10, 11 Imes 10 Jackson 10 Jamison 19 Jarrett 32 Jay 19 Journeys Through Jackson Winter 2016 48 Jenkins 7 Jimison 32 Johnson 7, 9, 10, 14, 18, 23, 37 Johnston 20 Jones 10, 11, 13, 23, 24, 31, 32 Justice 11 Kalb 19 Keener 22 Keith 26 Kelly 10 Kirkland 10 Kitchens 9 Knight 30 Lackey 21 Lambert 21, 22 Lanning 11 Leatherwood 31 Ledford 23 Leiter 9 Lequire 31 Lewis 20, 29 Little 28 Littlejohn 22 Lockhart 25 Lockhart 28 Lombard 11 London 10 Long 15, 23 Love 15, 24, 30 Luck 31 Luker 45 Mansur 35 Marr 10 Marshall 18 Masengale 23 Mason 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 Mathis 21, 22, 30, 43, 44 McClure 9, 11, 25 McConnel 32 McDade 31 McDaniel 18 McDonald 18, 21, 27 McEntire 10 McGinnis 17 McHan 22, 31 McLain 30 McNeeley 32 Medford 32 Melton 43 Messer 23, 24 Middleton 6, 23 Millis 11 Mills 11, 13, 14, 15, 16, 20, 30 Mingus 24 Monteath 24 Monteith 7, 10, 11 Montieth 10 Moody 32 Moore 9, 23, 30, 33 Mophet 15 Morehead 20 Morgan 21, 31 Morris 30 Morrow 10, 18 Moser 11 Moses 9 Mundy 21 Murphy 22 Nardy 11 Nichols 10, 11, 31, 32 Nicholson 43 Norman 10, 15, 27 Norton 9 Orr 27 Overstreet 7 Owen 10, 43 Owens 9, 10, 14, 20 Oxner 11 Painter 13, 21, 29, 30, 31, 32 Pangle 10 Pannel 15 Pannell 11, 24 Parker 4, 9, 10, 11, 31, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 43 Parris 7, 10, 11, 31 Passmore 23 Paterson 23 Patrick 11 Patterson 10, 11, 16, 17, 18, 21, 29, 30 Peck 25 Peek 9 Perkins 17 Phillips 11, 18, 23, 30, 38, 40 Picklesimer 10 Porter 26 Posey 10 Postell 45 Poston 10 Potts 11 Proctor 11 Pruett 11 Pruitt 30 Queen 9, 10, 11, 16, 23, 32 Ramsey 11 Ratcliffe 11 Raxter 42 Reed 13, 22 Reese 22 Reynolds 9, 11 Rhinehart 26 Rice 10, 21 Rich 11 Rickman 21 Robinson 15, 23, 29, 30, 31 Rochester 10 Rogers 11, 23, 32 Rolinson 27 Russell 11 Scherrer 10 Scruggs 43, 44 Searcy 23, 28 Self 27, 40 Sellers 9 Seymours 41 Sharpe 10 Shearer 10 Shelton 9, 10, 11 Sheppard 32 Shepperd 30 Sherrill 7, 10, 32, 39 Shook 11, 12 Shook 23 Shuler 7, 8, 9, 11, 15, 21 Simpson 22, 32 Sims 21, 22 Smathers 31 Smith 5, 10, 11, 28, 33 Stanfield 24 Stephens 7, 9, 11, 22 Stewart 30 Stiles 10, 11, 24 Stillwell 34 Stuart 13 Styles 31 Sumpter 11 Sutton 9, 10, 11, 13, 29, 30, 31, 32, 34 Swafford 10 Swanson 35 Swearingem 10 Sweezy 17 Talent 21 Tallent 21 Talley 12 Tatham 33, 34, 35, 36 Taylor 11, 22, 23 Teague 39 Thomas 24, 38 Trantham 22 Turpin 29 Umphress 28 Upton 11 Vance 7, 11 Vinson 14 Waldroop 22 Ward 10, 30 Watkins 32 Watson 11, 22, 29, 32 Weaver 11 Webb 23 Welch 30 West 23 White 23 Whitley 34 Whitmire 11 Widmeir 11 Wiegel 11 Wiggins 10, 11 Wike 10, 21, 23, 31 Wikle 11 Wild 32 Willis 40, 42 Wills 21 Wilson 7, 9, 10, 11, 21, 22, 23, 28, 32, 36 Winchester 10 Withers 30 Womack 18 Womeldorff 27 Wood 4, 14, 41 Woods 4 Woody 11 Wright 9, 26 York 11 Young 22 Zachary 9, 11, 22 MEMBERSHIP Membership in the Jackson County Genealogical Society is open to all individuals who apply and pay dues. Membership is based on the calendar year and dues are paid in advance. Members joining late in the year will receive back issues of the society's journal for that year. Annual dues are $20 for individuals and $25 for family memberships. Individual lifetime memberships are available based on age: 16-29 $350 60-69 $150 30-39 300 70-79 100 40-49 250 80+ 50 50-59 200 APPLICATION FOR MEMBERSHIP New ____ Renewal ____ Life ____ Amount Paid __________ Name ______________________________________________________________________ Address ___________________________________________________________________ City ___________________________________ State ______ Zip Code __________ Phone _____________________________________________________________________ E – mail address __________________________________________________________ Families or Areas of Interest _____________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ Make check payable to JCGS, Inc., and mail to: P. O. Box 480, Sylva, NC 28779 JCGS, Inc. P. O. Box 480 Sylva, NC 28779 http://www.jcncgs.com Office and research library at the Jackson County Court House Telephone: 828-631-2646 e-mail address: jacksongenealogy@dnet.net Follow us on Facebook

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Journeys Through Jackson 2015 Vol.25 No.02
Jackson County Genealogical Society (N.C.)
Academic Journal Academic Journal | 01/01/2015 Please log in to see more details
Journeys Through Jackson is the official journal of the Jackson County Genealogical So... more
Journeys Through Jackson 2015 Vol.25 No.02
01/01/2015
Journeys Through Jackson is the official journal of the Jackson County Genealogical Society, Inc. The journal began as a monthly publication in July 1991, was published bimonthly from 1994 to 2003, and continues today as a quarterly publication. The journal issues in this digital collection are presented as annual compilations. ; Journeys Through Jackson The Official Journal of the Jackson County Genealogical Society, Inc. Vol. XXV, No. II Spring 2015 JACKSON COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY, INC. 2015 Officers President . Timothy Osment Vice Presidents . Lynn Hotaling, Jason Gregory Secretary . Mary Buchanan Smith Treasurer . Teresa Deitz Manring Librarian. Marie Clark Office Manager . Karen Nicholson Web Master . Deanne G. Roles Computer Technician . Jason N. Gregory Chair, Publications (Editor) . Sanji Talley Watson Journeys Through Jackson is the official publication of the Jackson County Genealogical Society. Members and non-members are invited to submit genealogical materials for publication, with the understanding that the editor reserves the right to edit these materials for genealogical content, clarity, or taste. The Society assumes no responsibility for errors of fact that may be contained in submissions, and except where noted, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor or of the Jackson County Genealogical Society. The Society accepts no advertising for this publication except for notices from other non-profit groups. From the Editor As summer months approaches, we find ourselves busy with all of the trappings of hot weather: trying to stay cool; working in our flowers, gardens and yards; and traveling on vacations. I often think about what my ancestors would think about our “busy” lives. They didn’t have all of the modern day conveniences that we have. Yet, they led full and productive lives. They worked hard and even had time for “fun.” When I’m busy canning with a modern kitchen at my disposal, I wonder “How in the world did they do all this with a wood cook stove, no refrigeration, and sometimes no electricity?” I have come to realize that they were a sturdy stock of people, who made do with what they had. I think there are some lessons to be learned from remembering the past. I’m grateful that my ancestors taught me how to make a living off of the land, how to take care of what you have, to be a friend to all, and to appreciate the small things in life. As always, I appreciate all of the people who are interested in genealogy and the sharing of their knowledge of the families and of the history of our beautiful area. I am glad that some bring in information for JTJ. It is a blessing to have such people share their information. If you would like to share family information, stories from your family, pictures, etc, feel free to get them to me at the JCGS office. Also, we have family files and family notebooks that you may place your information in. One more thing, if you would like to volunteer a few hours at the office, please do so. If you are hesitant because “I don’t know anything” or “What can I do?” don’t let that hold you back. We will help you learn all of the ins and outs of what we have to offer at the office. Honestly, some of the best rewards in life are helping someone else. Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 49 Table of Contents Table of Contents, Announcements and Expression of Sympathy .49 JCGS Photo Album. 50-54 The Man Who Gave Sylva It’s Name . 55-62 1880 Census Records for Jackson County . 63-66 Descendants of Archer Blanton . 67-70 1936 Jackson County Death Certificates . 71-74 Continuation of The Man Who Gave Sylva It’s Name .74 Doctor’s Daily Journal . 75-78 2015 Scholarship Winners . 79-82 Joseph M. Sutton Family . 83-86 Descendants of John Thomas Tatham . 87-90 World War I Draft Cards . 91-94 Index . 95-96 We offer our sincere condolences and sympathy to the family of JCGS Life member Sally Bryson Wood on her recent passing. Also, to the family of JCGS members Wayne Cobb and Vernon Painter. We also extend our condolences and sympathy to JCGS member, Mary Jo Hooper Cobb on the recent passing of her loved one. Dear friends, As we approach our 25th year, the Jackson County Genealogical Society would like to thank each of you for your support. After almost a quarter-century, our original commitment has not changed: to encourage and share genealogical and historical research. We have many exciting and interesting things planned for the rest of 2015 and well into 2016. Mark your calendars! We are planning an October 8 fundraiser that will feature live music, refreshments, drawings, and a silent auction. However, if you would like to help immediately, enclosed in this issue is a membership / volunteer brochure. Note that in addition to financial support, we also need volunteers to staff the JCGS office for half or full days, once a week. Please call 828-631-2646 or 273-7619 if you have a few hours that you can donate. Thank you in advance and please plan to attend our event on October 8. Sincerely, Tim Osment JCGS Board President Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 50 JCGS Photo Album Recently, in the JCGS office, this family has come up in several peoples family lines. The pictures above were given to us by Keitha Owen Parton. She is also related to this family. The gentleman on top left is John Edward “Jackson” Slatton (1 Oct 1794-10 Aug 1897), the woman top right is his daughter, Martha Slatton (9 Jun 1830-25 Feb 1921). The bottom two pictures were in family pictures in possession of the editor. Bottom left is Richard Dyre Talley Slatton (2 May 1846-13 May 1935) and the woman to the bottom right is his wife, Sarah Jane Hooper Slatton (2 Sep 1851-29 Sep 1893) and unknown child. Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 51 JCGS Photo Album Kimberley Ashe has shared more of her mother’s, (Gwendolyn McCall Ashe) pictures with us. The cabin above belonged to Jimmie and Sarah Galloway. They were the parents of Rev Josiah Galloway and Thomas C. Galloway. Rev. Josiah Galloway was the father of Elias Galloway and his picture is below. Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 52 JCGS Photo Album The man and woman in the above two pictures are William Walker (5 Nov 1852-26 Nov 1943) and Mary Ann Owen McCall (1 Jun 1855-14 Feb 1949). The cabin below was their home in the Pinhook community of the Canada Township. The home place was located where the Pinhook Campground is today. The lady on the porch was Mary Ann and the lady in the edge of the picture is unknown at this time. Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 53 JCGS Photo Album The picture above is: boy in front Harvey Daves; left to right: Alvoid Daves, Mary Daves, Mary Ann & Walker McCall, unknown girl,; woman standing in back is Sarah McCall Luker Daves. The picture below is also of Sarah (30Mar 1879-13 Aug 1954). The lady to the left is Charlotte Lottie McCall (24 May 1876-29 Jun 1970.) These two ladies were daughters of Walker and Mary Ann. Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 54 JCGS Photo Album The picture to the left are children of Walker and Mary Ann McCall as follows: Frank (18 Feb 1893-28 Sep 1976); Charlie (23 Jun 1888-23 Sep 1972); Charlotte; Elbert (23 Apr 1887-13 Jul 1969); Rob (26 Feb 1882-2 Dec 1984); and Fred (18 Feb 1893- 12 Dec 1979). This picture was taken at a decoration in the Canada Township. The picture below was brought to us by Dorothy Luker Henry and Kimberley Ashe, and is of the John Lee Shook family. Back row left to right: Della Shook, Vaughn Shook, Minnie Shook, Ollie Shook, Deltha Shook; front row from left to right: Nellie Shelton Shook, J. C. Shook, Mary Galloway Shook holding Dick Shook, John Lee Shook holding Edward Shook. Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 55 The Man Who Gave Sylva Its Name ED: At the April meeting of the JCGS, Lynn Hotaling and George Frizzell gave a very interesting program on William D. Selvey. He was the gentleman that the town of Sylva was named for. The following article is a brief summation of the program they gave. The articles and letters are printed verbatim. It is included here for the members that missed the actual program. Foreword by Lynn Hotaling The man for whom the town of Sylva was named did not spell his name as the town does. That fact became clear several years ago due to the efforts of George Frizzell, who determined that the man’s name was actually William D. Selvey. The oft-repeated tale around town until January 2011 was that Sylva had been named for a “wayfaring Dane” – William Demetrius Sylva – who arrived in the area in January 1879 and worked for and stayed with E. R. Hampton and Judge Riley Cannon. Hampton, the man who owned much of the land where present-day Sylva is located, asked his young daughter Mae what he should call the post office he planned to charter. Mae, who had taken a liking to her father’s young employee (Sylva was in his early 20s at that time), told her father to call it “Sylva.” This “fairy-tale” story was unknown to many town residents until 1924, when Sylva himself sent his 1924 letter that described how he had arrived here one winter night, been taken in, and how Mae Hampton had told her father to name the post office after him. Thus was born the “dramatic” tale of the town’s naming, and legendary local newspaper columnists John Parris and Bob Terrell immortalized the story in print. The Herald continued to write the story, which we mostly based on the piece Terrell wrote for the 1951 Jackson County Centennial edition. In 1989, the occasion of Sylva’s centennial, the newspaper spoke to William D. Sylva’s daughter Maude, then in her 80’s and she added a few details to the story: her father was born in Georgia, his father James Selvey died during the Civil War, her father went to Texas with his Uncle Richard Broome. Maude’s sister, Lena Wheeler, visited here in 1956 and apparently tried to set the record straight. In an interview with the late J. D. McRorie, longtime Herald news editor, Wheeler reportedly said her family spelled the name “S-e-l-v-a.” A;; we can assume now that we’ve talked to family members is that Wheeler must have said something like “our family spells it with an “ey” and J. D., who had just arrived in town, understood her to say “an ‘e’ instead of a ‘y.’ ” In any event, lacking any kind of archive system for our issues prior to 1999, we were all unaware of the irregularity. “I was looking at an article in a 1956 Sylva Herald, ‘Daughter of Man for Whom Sylva Was Named Is Visitor In Town,’ and it spelled his name ‘Selva.’ I couldn’t find the name in the census records that looked right, so I found a column (another repetition of the “wayfaring Dane” story that did include the 1989 update from Maude) from Feb. 9, 2006, that talked about him and mentioned his marriage in November 1895 in Texas, “George said. “A genealogy web site had marriages listed and I found a W. D. ‘Selvey’ who married Abbie Wallace (actually Wallis) on Nov. 17, 1895 After that I found a Will Selvey, age 39, on the federal census living in Johnson County, Texas, which is where Cleburne is located, and a wife Abbie and daughter Will Lena (actually Willena, though she went by Lena, according to family members). The name is showing up elsewhere with that spelling.” George then determined that Sylva/Selvey’s mother had likely been born here, in Jackson County’s Canada community, but raised in Georgia. According to George’s research, Allen Clifton Broom and Sallie Queen Broom had a daughter, Mary, born in 1835. Sallie died two years later giving birth to a son, and Mary was taken in by one of her mother’s brothers, Lewis Queen, and his wife – another Sally – who moved to Union County, Georgia. Mary’s brother, W. L. D. Broom, was raised in Jackson County by other family members. After his wife’s death, Allen Broom moved to Tennessee, remarried, and began a second family. While George continued to search online, I began calling members of the local Broom and Queen families. Though none of them had ever heard any story about Sylva’s namesake being related to them, Bill Broom, a great-grandson of W.L.D. Broom, had heard that his great-great-grandfather moved to Tennessee. Dot Queen Conner, who traced her family’s genealogy, had a record of Allen and Sallie Broom’s children, including the fact that their daughter was raised in Georgia by Lewis and Sally Queen. George’s research continued to point to the same local connection – than rather than being a “stranger” when he came to town, William Sylva/Selvey, would have had numerous close relatives in Canada and Caney Fork communities. But, even though we became more and more convinced that the town namesake’s mother was Mary Broom and his father James Silvey (George found an 1860 census from Pickens County, Ga., that listed in one Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 56 household James Silvey, Mary Broom and a 3-year-old son, William), there’s no real proof because most Pickens County marriage records from that time were destroyed by fire. George did find a James Selvey (with an alternate spelling of Silvey) who was with a Georgia regiment and died at Vicksburg, Miss., during the Civil War, and Maude’s 1989 interview appears to confirm that. I talked to Gene Anne Huddleston, William Sylva/Selvey’s granddaughter and Carol Sullivan’s aunt, who said she remembers hearing her grandmother and aunt speak of Mary Broom. That 2011 conversation with Gene Ann, who still lives in Cleburne, was enough to make me believe that our town’s namesake is Mary Broom’s son, who ventured to this area because he had relatives here. The question remains as to why he took such pains to appear mysterious. In Sylva/Selvey’s 1924 letter, which contains lots of local details that George has verified, such as the names of Hampton and Cannon family members and the fact that Henry Brendle was sheriff, we find this passage: “I got the second letter that came to the new office. It was mailed at Fort Gibson, Cherokee Nation, and was forwarded from Webster. I left it on the table as don’t think any of them could read it most of it was in Danish. I don’t think I received more than 3 letters all time I was there and did not tell no one where I come from. Henry Brendle was the sheriff. He come down one Sunday and attempted to interview me. But I had learned to say my little piece long before I met him.” This one passage is apparently the source of the “wayfaring Dane/mysterious stranger” mythology that persists. All the family members we interviewed said there is no evidence of any Danish heritage. There is a family story of a Cherokee ancestor, and genealogy research indicates that William D. likely had a sister, Amelia, who married John Reeves and lived in Cherokee Territory in Oklahoma. William Selvey and his wife Abbie, lived there for a time themselves before moving back to Cleburne. We’ve never seen the original letter, so we don’t know whether he actually wrote “Danish” or if that’s how someone read his handwriting Could he actually have written “Spanish?” Gene Ann confirmed that the family lived on “Shaw” Avenue in Cleburne, and whoever transcribed the letter typed it as “Shard.” Also, because we’ve not seen the letter, we don’t know how he wrote his name. Did he spell it “Sylva” because he knew that was how Hampton had spelled it? Or did he write :Selvey,” which was read as “Sylva” because that’s the town name. And what made Hampton choose S-y-l-v-a? Did William Selvey, who might at that time have spelled his name Silvey, and said it “Sil-vee” – the way many in Canada still pronounce the town name – only to have Hampton hear “Sil-vah?” Or, did Hampton know full well the man’s name was Silvey or Selvey but think “Sylva” looked or sounded better? Local speech patterns could also shed light on the matter and account for the spelling/phonetics confusion. Old-timers from Tuckasegee’s Canada community routinely pronounced this town’s name as “Sylvee,” despite the fact that it’s always been spelled Sylva. Did William D. say his name as if it were “Selvey” and Gen. Hampton think he meant “Sylva?’ Others from the Tuckasegee area pronounce their own community as “Tuck-a-see-juh” or “Tuck-a-seege,”rather than “Tuck-a-see-jee.” If Sylva/Silvey/Selvey, spoke similarly, he could have pronounced Selvey or Silvey as Selva, which Hampton could have heard as Sylva. After all, because William Sylva/Selvey’s mother was likely born in Jackson County’s Canada Section, some local speech patterns could have influenced young Sylva/Selvey’s dialect. It also means that far from being a stranger to the area, the young man could have visited here before, since his mother was raised in Georgia by members of the local Queen family, and his mother’s brother grew up in Canada. While we may never see the original letter to Sylva from the town’s namesake, we have a copy – not a transcript -- of the answer to that letter. It’s dated Oct. 27, 1924, and was written by early Sylva industrialist E. L. McKee. It tells the same story of how the town got its name, and it’s addressed to Mr. W. D. Sylva. Annotated William Sylva and E. L. McKee Letters Research and footnoted by George Frizzell The W.D. Sylva Letter of 1924 – A Glimpse of Jackson County in 1879-1880 The text for the following letter was taken from a transcript that was requested by H. T. Hunter, who at that time was president of Western Carolina Teachers College, now Western Carolina University. Hunter’s cover letter of December 19, 1933, to Prof. Edgar H. Stillwell of the institution’s History faculty commented: Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 57 “Prof. Madison1 showed me a very interesting letter which has been in the possession of Miss Luck, of Sylva, for several years.2 It relates to the naming of the Post Office at Sylva. I have had Miss Moore to make a copy of this letter as I thought it had some historic value, and am passing it on to you.” The original letter has not yet been located, but it is assumed to have been handwritten given the varying interpretations in spellings and punctuation. The text of the 1933 transcription appears to have retained these errors. However, the Asheville Citizen (Asheville, NC) newspaper in its December 18, 1932, issue had printed an excerpt of the letter with different punctuations and spellings as well as possible clarifications to the text. The article’s introduction claimed that, “In 1924, a letter addressed to the postmaster in Sylva, was received here bearing the postmark of Cleburne, Tex.3 That was 45 years since the memorable evening….” Only notable differences in the two versions are noted in footnotes. The letter relates Sylva’s recollections of the naming of the post office in the community, of individuals and businesses, and of his life after leaving Jackson County. Two families featured prominently in the letter are those of E. R. Hampton and Riley H. Cannon. Cannon (26 Mar 1822 – 15 Feb 1886) appeared on the 1880 federal census for Jackson County in Webster Township. His age was given as 58 and his occupation as lawyer. He and his family were part of the same household as Hampton. In addition, the 1880 census for “Manufactures” listed a lumber mill/sawmill and a flour mill/grist mill belonging to R. H. Cannon. The flour/grist mill was specifically listed as being on Scotts Creek. For several months in 1879, the North Carolina Citizen (Asheville, NC) ran an advertisement for Cannon and Hampton that listed Cannon as “Ex-Judge Supe’r Court” and Hampton as “Ex-Clerk U.S. Courts.” The advertisements also commented that they were “Attorneys at Law, Webster, NC.” Cannon is buried in Webster Cemetery Sylva’s letter mentioned daughters Lula, age 18, and Laura, age 15, who were both listed as teachers. Also in 1880 Cannon’s son, George was in Buncombe County and listed as age 28 and occupation “U.S. Gauger.” A gauger is, according to Webster’s Dictionary is “one that gauges, exciseman or customs officer who checks, measures and sometimes assesses the levy on dutiable bulk goods….” As noted in the letter, Cannon’s wife, Nancy L. Sorrell (1834-1877) was deceased at the time of Sylva’s arrival in Webster. The couple had married on 18 Oct. 1850. As noted above, on the 1880 census, E. R Hampton (16 Nov 1846-8 Mar 1908) was in Webster Township, with his age listed as 33 and his occupation as lawyer. The household included his wife, Eva Hampton, and daughter, Eugenia May Hampton. Hampton is credited as the founder of the town of Sylva. The North Carolina Citizen (Asheville, NC) in an article from 6 Nov 1879, entitled “From Cherokee to Buncombe” noted that: “Webster, and Jackson county generally, is improving greatly. Several new stores and residences are going up in Webster. General Hampton, besides his law practice, is doing a large, and we trust lucrative, business as a merchant, some four miles from town. Also doing a large business with his lumber mills.” James H. Cathey wrote an obituary for Hampton that appeared in the Jackson County Journal on 13 Mar 1908, that noted he was often referred to as “General” Hampton. However, even though the Jackson County Journal obituary says that Hampton “was hospital steward in the 20th North Carolina Battalion,” the article also noted that “(h)ow he gained the sobriquet of ‘General’ we are not informed.” Hampton is buried in Keener Cemetery, Sylva, NC. Principal sources used for the footnotes to this letter include: Max R. Williams, The History of Jackson County (Sylva, NC; Jackson County Historical Association, 1987); Jackson County Genealogical Society, Jackson County Heritage (Cullowhee, NC; JCGS, 1992); and Jackson County Genealogical Society, The Cemeteries of Jackson County, North Carolina, (Cullowhee, NC; JCGS, 1998). Cleburne, Texas 313 Shard. Ave4 From: W. D. Sylva, Postmaster Sylva, NC ___________________________ I am sending you some history that may surprise you unless you are 50, or 60 yrs of age. Jan. 6th, 1879, If I am not mistaken about dusk I walked up to the door of a white house Just in the Edge of Webster the County Site of Jackson Co.5 the house was Just a little ways west of the cemetery, when I knocked on the door a Small like man with red mustache and brown Eyes open and said good Evening.6 I told him I wanted to get lodging, he said the house did not belong to him but await the time with patience till my request could be made known to Judge Cannon and his answer returned he came back and bade me come In, Supper bed and breakfast – nex day E. R. Hampton went to Asheville Judge Cannon and I went out on Scotts Creek to his Mills and he told me he wanted me to stop and live awhile with him Said his wife was Dead and Lou and Laura was at his son George In Asheville I staid with them 2 or 3 weeks and Capt. Bill Enloe owned a store and a Tannery and Mill down on the River7 Cap Enloe wanted me to work but Judge told him he could not let me go – Well when the School closed at Salem the girls came to Asheville and the Judge and me went and brought them home Loula married Alf Parker Distr (?) Court Clerk,8 I have forgotten who Laura married Hampton had one little girl and her name was Mae when they decided to move to the Mill the lived9 Jas. H Hampton10 and Lucien Baldwin he came from Hendersonville also Charley Parker11 he lived out about Mullers Distillery12 15 miles from Asheville, we went to sawing lumbr we run day and Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 58 night the first we put up the little Store house then we Sawed lumber to build Hamptons house we built it out west of the Mills between the Hill and the creek there was not anything on the North side of the creek except a little Blk. Smith Shop13 when we got established out there E. R. Hampton Petitioned to the P.O. Dept. for a Post Office he asked Mae what we would name the Office. She said Sylva I said no call It Baldwin or Parker but Mrs. Hampton and Mae Said no the Office is Named. I got the 2nd letter that came to the new office It was mailed at Fort Gibson Cherokee Nation14 and was For’wd 15 from Webster I left It on the table as don’t think any of them could read it. as Most of It was Danish16 I don’t think I Red more than 3 letters all time I was and did not tell any one where I came from17 Henry Brindle was Sherif he come down on Sunday and attempted to Interview me. but I had learned to Say my piece long before I met him18 If there Is any Jug Riley Cannon or E.R. Hamptons family there pleas give me their names and tell ne Something of the Town Schools – Churches – Lodges and Some discription of the Town I was At Willmington Del when the Armitice19 was made and intended to home by way of Asheville Sylva but I was Just well of Flu and was afraid I might Expose myself and relaps I guess I had best close or I may have to send this by Freight I would love to tell you many things but I don’t know who I am writing and this the first time I have attempted to write to any one for 10 Mos I don’t like this place but have made arrangements to Stay till Spring. Several20 ago I got a wound on the side of my face that Made a cancer but did not hurt me much until 2 yrs ago while I was In Oakland I had It Operated on and Since that time It has caused me much trouble and considerable Money by21 for the last 15 days I have been doing fine I have Specialist treating me In Clayton Mo.22 It Just cost me 76.50 to make the trip I don’t think I will have to go more than once more If you know anything of James Hampton give me his address I wrote him June 8, 188923 from Havanna. I was running a Construction Engine for the good old U.S.A. at that time the letter was returned. I guess most of the Town Is on the North Side of the Creek, Some time before I went there Simpson and Littlefield had graded part of the R.R. bed between there and Waynesville24 on which side of the Creek is the Depot.25 Ill have to call off for his time hoping you all are in better Shape financially or Socially and Morally than this Country. If you are not God must be forgotten. In conclusion I Send best wishes to the people of Sylva hoping you may live long and happy. I don’t have to make any plea for my character as It has never been chalenged yet. I have lived a sober life Some Say I look to be 45 yrs old not Standing my hair is getting Some gray Since I have been afflicted I have never been addicted to drinking or narcotics of any nature never had a case In any Court Criminal or Civil never Sat on a Jury been witness 3 times twice in Court Marshall on In Chancerry not standing all my adventures with my Joys and Sorrows If I have an Enemy I don’t know it I never mix up much have not been to a circus in 25 yrs never was In but one Movie and then I went In to make an arrest that was In Oakland Cal had another killing here last night and had to call out Battery B. to avert a Lynching Just 1 or 2 Each week that’s all the Battery and all the Country and Municipal Court control the gamblers and bootleggers this place Is as Corrupt as Hollywood Cal Chicago, Hessin or Hades – well I guess I had better call off – as I have Scribbled Everything good wishes I am yours Resp.26 W.D. Sylva 313 Shard. Ave. Cleburne, Texas Exact Copy D. Moore FOOTNOTES: 1. Robert L. Madison (1867-1954) was founder of the Cullowhee High School, also known as Cullowhee Academy. During his tenure as president of the school from 1889-1912, it became Cullowhee Normal & Industrial School. The institution developed into Western Carolina University. Madison was also on the institutions English faculty from 1920-1937, and also served a second tenure as the institutions president , 1920-1923. 2. Sadie Luck was for many years the librarian at the public library in Sylva. 3. The 1933 transcript does not provide a date, but the Asheville Citizen alludes to a postmarked envelope. Cleburne is in Johnson County, southwest of Dallas, Texas. 4. The Asheville Citizen article gives the address as Shaw Avenue Google Maps does not show a Shard Avenue in Cleburne, but there is a Shaw Avenue. 5. Webster was the county seat of Jackson County at the time of W.D. Sylva’s arrival. 6. The Asheville Citizen article added a comment that the “house was just where the road turned going from Charleston and just a little ways west of the cemetery” There is no mention of Charleston, NC in the 1933 transcript, even though Charleston would have been the correct reference to present-day Bryson City, NC, in 1879. Charleston changed its name to Bryson City in 1889. The man who opened the door might have been Benjamin Davis, who was enumerated on the 1880 census as living in the Hampton and Cannon household In 1880 Davis was 48 years old, listed with an occupation of “Mechanic,” and was born in Tennessee. 7. William Alfred Enloe 7 Jun 1832-10 Apr 1917) appeared on the “Tenth Census of North Carolina, 1880, Schedules 3 and 4, Manufactures” as the owner of a flour/grist mill on Savannah Creek and also of as owner of a tannery under the entry fir “Leather (Tanned and Curried).” He was enumerated on the 1880 census for Jackson County in Webster Township with an age of 48 and an occupation of retail merchant. During the Civil War, he had enlisted in Company F, 29th NC Troops and was made captain August 31, 1861. He resigned in April 1863 due to health reasons (NC Troops, vol. 8 p. 280). In its Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 59 March 27, 1879 issue, the North Carolina Citizen (Asheville, NC) ran an article “Jackson Items” which noted that, “Money matters are tight, but provisions of every kind which we raise in this country are abundant. Our merchants are increasing their stock of goods. Capt. W. A. Enloe is receiving a new stock of goods to day;….” Enloe is buried in Webster cemetery. 8. Alfred M. Parker (b. c. 1857-) and Lula A. Cannon married on 9 Nov 1880. The Asheville Citizen spelled out “Distr” as “District” 9. The Asheville Citizen says “hired.” 10. This may be the James Hampton mentioned at the end of the letter. A James Hampton was listed on the 1880 census for Buncombe County. His age was given as 24, occupation as store clerk, and was living in the household of his mother, Cela Hampton, age 58. On the 1900 census for Jackson County in Sylva Township Celia E. Hampton, then age 78, was in the household of Erastus R. Hampton and the relationship is given as mother. The 1860 census for Buncombe enumerated a household for Levi and Celia Hampton, then ages 41 and 38 respectively, and a son Erastus, age 13. 11. This might be the C. W. Parker listed as living in the Riley H. Cannon household in 1880. 12. W. O. Muller was listed on the 10th census in 1880 under “Manufactures” of Buncombe County as the owner of a distilling operation. Also, in the Tuckasegee Democrat (Sylva, NC) in its December 1, 1888, issue ran an advertisement for W. O. Muller & Co. as a “Wine and Liquor Merchant.” 13. The Asheville Citizen article spelled out “Blk. Smith” as “blacksmith.” A Burton Jones appeared on the 1880 census for Jackson County in Scotts Creek Township as a blacksmith. 14. The town of Fort Gibson, as opposed to the military post of the same name, is in present-day Cherokee County and Muskogee County, Oklahoma. At the time of Sylva’s letter, the Cherokee Nation was located in Indian Territory, now present-day Oklahoma. 15. The Asheville Citizen article used “forwarded.” 16. Both the Asheville Citizen article and the 1933 transcript indicated the letter was written in Danish, while the December 1, 1956, issue of the Sylva Herald in an article by J. D McRorie titled “Search for Photo Ends After Five Years; Sam H. Montieth Presents Picture of W. D. Sylva to Town” said Spanish. To date, no verifiable evidence to indicate Danish versus Spanish, or another interpretation, has been located. 17. The Asheville Citizen used “received” for “Red.” 18. H. P. Brendle was sheriff of Jackson County from 1876-1884. Henry P. Brendle was enumerated on the 1880 census in Webster Township as being 30 years old and with an occupation of sheriff. 19. Presumably the Armistice ending World War I that was signed on November 1, 1918. 20. There appears to be a word missing at this point which might be “years.” 21. The “by” might have been meant to be “but.” 22. There is a Clayton, Missouri, which is a suburb of St. Louis. 23. It is uncertain if this date is correct or if it was meant to reference the Spanish-American War which was declared on April 21, 1898. 24. George Washington Swepson and M. S. Littlefield were involved in a scandal over the selling of bonds for the construction of the Western North Carolina Railroad (see J. P. Arthur, Western North Carolina: A History, chapter XIX). The route of the railroad was being graded though western North Carolina in 1882 and the Cowee tunnel incident near Dillsboro, NC, occurred in December 1882. The News and Observer (Raleigh, NC), December 23, 1882, p4, in reporting on a visit of North Carolina Governor Jarvis to western North Carolina to inspect the progress of the railroad’s construction noted that from “Pigeon River” (Canton, NC) “to the Balsam mountain the grading is completed and to the Cowee tunnel, which is sixteen miles further, the work is making fine progress and will be completed so far as the grading is concerned by March 1st.” There is a long article about the accident on the river during the construction of Cowee tunnel in the News and Observer (Raleigh, NC) for January 3, 1883, titled “An Awful Accident, Eighteen Convicts Drowned at Once, A Flat Boat Sinks With Them In The Tuckaseegee River.” 25. The lack of punctuation in the 1933 transcript suggests that Sylva might have been asking a question as to the location of the train depot along Scotts Creek. 26. The Asheville Citizen article uses the phrase “With good wishes I am yours resp.” E. L. McKee’s Letter to W. D. Sylva: Jackson County in 1924 E. L. McKee1 to W. D. Sylva, October 27, 1924 Sylva Tanning Company Tanners And Extract Manufacturers Sylva, NC Oct 27th 24 Mr. W. D. Sylva, Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 60 Cleburne, Tex. Dear Will: I call you Will as I have always knew will Sylva and as you will remember that the Cannon and Hampton families and my family were intimate. There is so much could tell you about Sylva don’t know where to begin and will only speak of few things. I know all about the history of Sylva that you speak of and that it was named after you. Some say it was named Sylva meaning Sylvan (woods) However, I knew that suggestion of the name came from your name as you were at Hamptons at the time I am the baby of the our family and wasa born in 71 nd am 53 years old now but feel about sixteen.2 Father died in 1890,3 mother is alive an is 934 years old and veryspry for her age Sister Hattie,5 and brother Jim are all dead.7 Genl. Hampton, Mrs. Hampton, and Maie all dead. It would be easier to give you the names of the ones still living that were here when you were here than to name the dead. Wish had the time to tell you them all and their children and will try to do so some time. Sylva has about 1500 population and is a very busy town.8 The principal part of the business is on South side of the railroad and main street begins at old mill and runs between Hampton house and mountain. The town is scattered over two miles square. We have a graded school with about four hundred pupils and a beautiful High School building (Consolidated School)9 many brick stores and buildings, A large tannery and chestnut extract works owned by Armour Co.10 and I am president of the company and it is known as The Sylva Tanning Co.11 and is located as {at?} what you knew as the Love Bottom just East of Sylva. In fact our property runs down to the old mill dam. We have about 350 employees and use about six thousand dollars worth of hides each day, and grind 14 cars chestnut wood per day and use about two cars of bark per day. We use part of the chestnut extract here and the balance is shipped to our Northern tanneries.12 We have two banks one of which I am Vice President of and I am also interested in Builders Supply Co, (Lumber) Sylva Supply Co, general merchandise, both of these companies I organized. Also in whole sale grocery business. We have two nice churches13 and the Baptist have a very good boarding school here.14 Thee [sic] is a railroad runs out from Sylva up Tuckase gee [sic] river principally for the lumber.15 There is a great band mill at East La Porte.16 There is a big state school at Cullowhee.17 We have fine highway to Asheville, gravel to Waynesville and hardsurface [sic] balance of the way.18 We have fine highways all over NC now and the old state is about the best in the union and the worls [sic] is sitting up and taking notice of us. We go to Asheville in motor cars in hur and forty five minutes.(52 miles highway) This is the county seat now and will send you a postal of the new courhouse19 [sic] which I built and will try to pick up some othr views around town Dillsboro and Sylva is oonnected by concrete road 1 ½ miles between towns. I married one of W. ___ [A.] Dills20 daughters of Dillsboro the last time, and we have one boy [ten?] and other ____ I have one boy 26 years old by my first marriage to a Miss Moody.21 You speak of not telling people much about yourself. Were you running from the sheriff (!) ?22 Sorry to learn of your troubles and hope you will soon be recovered. You will excuse this letter as am writing it myself rather than dictating to my stenographer as felt rather write you myself. Yours very truly E. L. McKee [signature] Hope you can visit Sylva. If anybody in particular you should wish to hear about let me know. Every old citizen of Webster is dead. Mr. L. C. Hall23 married sister Hannah24 has been dead years but she is alive and he [her] two grown sons are interested in the Sylva Supply Co and Mercantile Supply Co. Here are a few that are alive. Marcellus Buchanan25 who lives here, Neal Buchanan26 lives in Washington state. Mary Long who married Hanly Hanly is dead.27 Lee Leatherwood lives in Sylva and married B__.28 Cant think of any others that you would remember. Alf Parker lives in Oklahoma or Arkansas,29 can get you his add ress. Suppose Henry Brendle30 is dead as he left the county soon after you did. [signature] The railroad crossed the creek just below old dam and depot about five hundred feet West of crossing. Do you remember “Old Boss” the horse Judge Cannon drove? Bet you rode behind him to Sylva. I remember the old judge’s wheezing, and his old horse which was so gentle with him but would run away with young man. Think he had been an old race horse. Could not find the recent pictures of Sylva. FOOTNOTES: Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 61 1. Ernest Lyndon McKee (11 Sep 1871-6 Oct 1952) was the son of Robert and Matilda McKee and was born in Webster. The 1920 census listed Ernest L. McKee as age 48, living in Sylva, and with the occupation of tannery superintendent. McKee and his wife, Gertrude Dills McKee (8 Jul 1885-27 Nov 1948), were married on 19 Aug 1913. Gertrude McKee woud become to first woman elected to the state senate of North Carolina. The McKees had two sons, William Dills McKee and E. L. McKee, Jr. 2. According to The History of Jackson County (p.188), McKee was “second in entrepreneurial prominence” only to C. J. Harris. McKee was the “son of a Webster merchant who got his start through industry and native ability.” After studying telegraphy and working as a bookkeeper, “about 1900 he and Oscar J. Coward formed a mercantile partnership in Sylva. This business became Sylva Supply Company when C. J. Harris bought out Coward in 1902.” The History continues by noting other of McKee’s achievements prior to the 1924: “McKee’s association with C. J. Harris opened additional opportunities. In 1906 the two men helped found the Jackson County Bank and Harris also named McKee superintendent of the C. J. Harris Tanning Company in Sylva. When Armour Leather Company bought the tannery in 1915, McKee became president of the local operation. Later McKee was named president of the Parsons Tanning Company which included the Sylva operation plus two plants near Parsons, West Virginia.” (History of Jackson County, p. 189.) 3. Robert F. McKee was born 18 Dec 1830 and, as the letter indicated, died 2 Jun 1890. 4. Matilda Wells McKee was born 23 Feb 1832 and died 20 Jul 1928., 5. Hattie Virginia McKee was born 30 Aug 1858. She married Joseph Collins and the couple lived at Clyde, NC. 6. Henry Cummings McKee was born 9 Nov 1963. He married Mattie McLain and was employed by Armour Leather Company, which had purchased the Harris Tannery in Sylva in 1915. 7. The 1880 census listed Lyndon as age 8 in Webster in the household of his father, Robt. F. McKee, age 49, and whose occupation was retail sales. Also listed were his mother, Margh M., age 47; brother Henry C., age 16; sister Hannah M., age 14; brother James W., age 10; and two others in the household appear to have been servants, but the page is damaged. 8. Sylva had an enumerated population in 1920 of 863, which would grow to 1,340 by 1930. McKee’s figure of 1,500 may either be a guess reflecting the town’s growth, a reference to the township rather than the town, or to a combined population of Sylva and Dillsboro (History of Jackson County, p. 127; North Carolina Manual, 1923, pp. 423, 428); (North Carolina Manual, p. 135.) Growth of the town was reflected in the Jackson County Journal, April 25, 1924, “Much Building Activity in Sylva,” which stated: “There is a great deal of building activity beginning to manifest itself in Sylva, and the prospects are that new buildings erected, this year will equal the phenomenal number of last year … “Last year approximately half a million dollars was invested in new buildings in the thriving town of Sylva, 57 new residences and a number of handsome business buildings being erected, and indications are that the record of last year may be eclipsed in 1924.” 9. Sylva Central High School “opened for its first term September 12, 1924.” (Jackson County Heritage). 10. McKee “was connected with C. J. Harris in the tanning Company from 1910 until they sold to Armour Leather Company in 1915. He was also a partner with Harris in the Sylva Supply Company.” (Jackson County Heritage, Vol I, p. 335) 11. The Jackson County Journal in August 11, 1922, ran “Magazine Supplement” that featured a panoramic view of the Sylva Tanning ompany, subtitled “The Armour Plant At Sylva And the Majestic Ranges of Mountains Surrounding It. Mr. E. L. McKee, a Native Jacksonian, and Citizen of Sylva, is President of the Company.” 12. A Jackson County Journal article from March 3, 1933, titled “Railroad Opens Rich Territory” confirmed McKee’s comments on the size of the tannery operation: “One of the important indstrious [sic] in Jackson county, and the leading one in Sylva, the county seat, is the Sylva Tanning company established in 1902 by Charles J. Harris, of Dilsboro and purchased by the Armour interests of Chicago in 1915. In the following year, at the investigation of President McKee, the extract plant was built to supply the chain of 14 other tanneries operated throughout the country by Armour Leather company. The tannery has a capacity of 300 hides a day, the combined pant requiring the services of 350 men in normal times. Packer hides are used exclusively and converted into first grade belting leather. The extract department has a capacity of 200 barrels daily, or as expressed in pounds, 100,000 daily, making a total of 30,000,000 pounds annually. The plant requires 45,000 cords of chestnut wok [sic, wood] a year. Along industrial lines, the Builders Supply and Lumber company, plans additional growth with the installation in the near future of a railroad siding to serve a proposed planing mill that will turn out all types of dimension stock and building materials.” 13. The First Baptist Church of Sylva was “constituted on Saturday, November 26, 1887” as Sylva Baptist Church and “in 1908 a concrete block building was erected on the east side of Walnut Street” (Jackson County Heritage, Vol. I, p. 518). The First United Methodist Church was organized on December 12, 1888” and “in 1917 … a brick church building replaced the white frame church” (Jackson County Heritage, Vol. I, p.9). Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 62 14. Sylva Collegiate Institute operated from 1899-1932 (Jackson County Heritage, Vol I, p. 513) 15. Blackwood Lumber Company’s Tuckaseigee & Southeastern rail line. See the following footnote for additional information. 16. The size of Blackwood Lumber Company was mentioned in the Jackson County Journal for January 14, 1922 in the article “Blackwood Lbr. Co. Begins Operations.” “The big band mill of Blackwood Lumber Company at East Laporte began operations Tuesday, and was ready for full operation Wednesday morning, and is now running full time with a capacity of 40,000 feet of lumber daily, which can be and soon will be increased to 75,000 feet a day…. The company now has in its employ upwards of 300 men, 125 being at work at the mill, about 100 in the woods, 30 to 35 carpenters an the like, working on the erection of buildings at East Laporte and the rest on the railroad and other jobs. The Blackwood Lumber Company about two years ago purchased the large speculation boundary of hardwood and chestnut timber form the Jackson County Lumber Company, an immediately began the construction of a railroad known as the Tuckaseigee and Southeastern Railway Company, from Sylva by the enterprising little town of Cullowhee, to East Laporte, and thence up Caney Fork to the timber.” A second article in the Jackson County Journal, July 21, 1922, p. 1, “Jackson County’s newest Industry – Blackwood Lumber Company Manufacturing Lumber on Large Scale,” commented on the scale of the operation: “Owing to the low price of lumber which prevailed up to the opening of the war, it was not feasable [sic] to place this timber on the market, because it’s sic] inaccessibility, and to the fact that it’s [sic] successful operation required the construction of 20 miles of railway, requiring a large amount of capital. In 1920 The Blackwood Lumber Company became the purchaser of the tract, in fee, and immediately began operations on a large scale, constructing a railway from Sylva, the junction point with the Southern Railway, to East La Porte 12 ½ miles distant, and up Caney Fork to the woods. During 1921 the railway was completed to East a Porte and the construction of a town, saw mill and general pant site was begun. The double band mil, stores, offices, employee houses, and water system were completed early this year, and the mill has been in continuous operation ever since, sawing a large quantity of excellent hardwoods….” 17. The institution was know as Cullowhee Norma & Industrial School in 1924. 18. Improvements in roads designed for automobile travel were commented upon in the Jackson County Journal for March 3, 1922, in “Big Improvement in Store for Jackson Co.” “New highways, new school buildings, a new fraternal temple and plans for new hotels in Sylva and Jackson county are proposed, under way, or listed for development in the near future… One of the paramount projects contemplated is a link of the Asheville – Murphy – Atlanta highway connecting Sylva with Dillsboro, a distance of two miles. This it is proposed to hard surface thus encouraging all year round travel between the two towns to such an extent that many predict the eventual growth of Sylva toward Dillsboro and the latter toward the neighboring town until it will appear as if the two were one.” The Jackson County Journal on October 20, 1922 in “Begin Laying Concrete on Sylva Street” noted that “Laying of paving on the Main Street of Sylva was started….” 19. McKee actively participated in the construction of a new county courthouse in Sylva after the vote in May 1913 to remove the county seat from Webster He was on the “special committee to select, locate, and purchase the site,” he was one of the individuals to act as sureties for C. J. Harris proposal to build the courthouse for a fixed amount, and was chairman of the building committee. (The History of Jackson County, pp. 125-126). 20. W. A. Dills, founder of Dillsboro. 21. McKee’s first marriage was to Mattie Moody. They had one son. (Jackson County Heritage, Vol I, p. 335). 22. There are a series of dashes at this point that might be meant as an underline emphasizing McKee’s inquiry as to if W. D. Sylva was “running from the sheriff.” 23. Lucius Coleman Hall (11 Jun 1847-19 Jul 1892) and Hannah McKee Hall (12 Apr 1866-31 Jan 1962) are buried in Webster Cemetery (Cemeteries of Jackson County, p. 394). As McKee notes, L. C. Hall had been dead 32 years by 1924, but Hannah was still living. 24. “Hannah Margaret born 12 Apr 1866 married Lucius Coleman Hall a store owner and farmer. They lived in Webster and had three children. James Wells born 4 Aug 1869 married Caroline Bryson. He operated the Sylva Supply Company.” (Jackson County Heritage, Vol. I, p. 335). 25. Marcellus Buchanan (19 Jun 1862-14 Jan 1943) “was married to Laura Belle Leatherwood daughter of Felix and Annie Carter Leatherwood of Webster. He resided in Webster and Sylva until his death on January 14, 1943.” (Jackson County Heritage, Vol I, p. 122). Parents Joseph Depus and Eva Buchanan; he was the eldest child. Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 63 1880 Jackson County Census Records ED: We continue in this issue the Webster Township. Abstracted in 2015 by Sanji Talley Watson. The enumerator had trouble keeping the numbers of the households and families in order, they are abstracted as written. 214-230 Ensley, James J. 27 W – Farmer NC NC NC Sarah C. 25 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Sarah A. 7 W – Daughter “ “ “ William C. 3 W -- Son “ “ “ Ida J. 5 W – Daughter “ “ “ Elias C. 5/12 W – Son “ “ “ 215-231 Monteith, John A. 39 W – Farmer NC NC NC Sarah A. 37 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Mary H. 13 W – Daughter – Assisting keeping house “ “ “ Tiltha C. 11 W – Daughter – Assisting keeping house “ “ “ Salinda J. 10 W – Daughter – Assisting keeping house “ “ “ William D. 8 W – Son “ “ “ Samuel P. 6 W – Son “ “ “ Elias B. 3 W – Son “ “ “ 216-232 Hindson, Wm. 32 W – Farm Laborer SC SC SC Nancy E. 32 W – Wife – Keeping house NC NC NC Sarah C. H. 13 W – Daughter NC SC NC 216-233 Jones, Alfred 48 W – Farmer NC NC NC John W. 10 W – Son “ “ “ Travis T. 8 W – Son “ “ “ Mary A. 6 W – Daughter “ “ “ 217-234 Franklin, D. N. 48 W – Farmer NC NC NC Sarah A. 44 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Jephas 19 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ William 15 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ George 11 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ Thos. F. 8 W – Son “ “ “ Harrett E. 5 W – Daughter “ “ “ Daniel B. 3 W – Son “ “ “ 218-235 Sherrill, William 32 W – Farmer NC NC NC Summer 41 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Louisa L. 11 W – Daughter – Assisting keeping house “ “ “ William R. 8 W – Son “ “ “ Ridgman B. W – Son “ “ “ George D. 10/12 W – Son “ “ “ 219-236 Robison, W. A. 63 W – Farm Laborer NC PA NC Alic L. C. 54 W – Wife – Keeping house NC NC NC Margart L. 30 W – Daughter – Assisting keeping house “ “ “ Rachel C. 26 W – Daughter – Assisting keeping house “ “ “ James H. 22 W – Son – Farm Laborer GA NC NC Harrett F. 19 W – Daughter – Assisting keeping house GA NC NC Joseph T. 13 W – Son – Farm Laborer NC NC NC Alendora 10 W – Daughter “ “ “ David 3 W – Grandson “ “ “ -237 Robison, E. M. 28 W – Farm Laborer NC NC NC Pink M. 5 W – Son “ “ “ Samuel J. 3 W – Son “ “ “ Lavinia 1 W – Daughter “ “ “ Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 64 -238 M??????, Joseph 74 W -- NC NC NC Nancy 67 W – Wife “ “ “ Stiles, James A. 9 W -- “ “ “ -239 Russel, S. P. 27 W – Farm Laborer GA GA GA 221-239 Davis, Absalim 59 ? – Farm Laborer NC NC NC Didarny 48 ? – Wife – Keeping house NC -- --- John 28 -- Son – Farm Laborer NC NC NC Harrett 20 -- Daughter – Assisting keeping house “ “ “ George 19 -- Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ Mirah 16 -- Daughter – Assisting keeping house “ “ “ Emly 14 -- Daughter – Assisting keeping house “ “ “ Clarinda 12 -- Daughter – Assisting keeping house “ “ “ Artis 10 -- Daughter “ “ “ Linney 8 -- Daughter “ “ “ Davis, Mary 14 -- Sister – Assisting keeping house “ “ “ 222-240 Dills, John 37 W – Farmer NC NC NC Martha C. C. 24 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Samuel Z. 7 W – Son “ “ “ 223-241 Parris, Rufus R. 36 W – Farmer NC NC NC Hermie J. 33 W – Wife – Keeping house NC --- GA Allen C. 11 W – Son – Farm Laborer NC NC NC John A. 5 W – Son “ “ “ Airsa C. 2 W – Son “ “ “ 224-242 Turpin, T???? 36 W – Farmer NC NC NC Martha 23 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ James 8 W – Son “ “ “ George 5 W – Son “ “ “ Sallie 3 W – Daughter “ “ “ 225-243 Franklin, P. 24 W – Farm Laborer NC NC NC Margart A. 20 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Artie 3/12 W – Daughter “ “ “ 226-244 Franklin, Thos. 73 W – Overseer of Poor NC NC NC Jemima 71 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Margart M. 35 W – Daughter – Assisting keeping house “ “ “ Elizabeth 30 W – Daughter – Assisting keeping house “ “ “ Sarah 27 W – Daughter – Assisting keeping house “ “ “ Samuel 7 W – Grandson “ “ “ George 6 W – Grandson “ “ “ John B. 4 W – Grandson “ “ “ Cowan, Joseph ? W – In Poor Home NC NC NC S(unreadable), ? 51 W – In Poor Home NC NC NC ?????, Robert 15 W – In Poor Home NC NC NC Nelson, Jim 65 B – In Poor Home NC NC NC Dills, Abby 68 W – In Poor Home NC NC NC 227-245 Lewis, John 30 W – Farm Laborer NC NC NC Martha J. 30 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Henry 3 W – Son “ “ “ Albert 2/12 W – Son “ “ “ 228-246 Dills, William 34 W – Farmer NC NC NC Susan C. 30 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ 229-247 Cunningham, C. 34 W – Farm Laborer NC NC NC Rosale 29 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ 230-248 Allen, Kerra W. 21 W – Farm Laborer NC NC NC Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 65 M. Ann 23 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ 231-249 Conner, Rubin C. 40 W – Farm Laborer NC NC SC Margaret 40 W – Wife – Keeping house NC NC NC Nancy E. 14 W – Daughter – Assisting keeping house “ “ “ John R. 12 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ Joseph W. 10 W – Son “ “ “ George R. 6 W – Son “ “ “ Henry 11/12 W – Son “ “ “ -250 Conner, John P. 66 W – Father NC NC NC Elizabeth 65 W – Mother SC SC SC -251 Conner, S. P. 37 W – Farm Laborer NC NC NC Elizabeth 35 W – Wife Keeping house “ “ “ Cordela F. 14 W – Daughter – Assisting keeping house “ “ “ Lura C. 8 W – Daughter “ “ “ James D. 6 W – Son “ “ “ Hattie W. 3 W – Daughter “ “ “ 232-252 McDade, C. W. 24 W – Farm Laborer SC SC SC Callie 24 W – Wife – Keeping house NC NC NC Maggie 2 W – Daughter NC SC NC Blackburn, J. A. 21 W – Farm Laborer GA --- --- 233-253 Angel, Lewis M. 56 W – Farmer NC NC NC Nasina 55 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Thomas W. 18 W – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ Sallie C. 12 W – Daughter – Assisting keeping house “ “ “ 234-254 Dills, William A. 37 W – Farmer NC NC NC Allis M. 20 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Minnie 2 W – Daughter “ “ “ -255 Moore, William 23 M – Farm Laborer NC NC NC Mellie 17 M – Housekeeper “ “ “ 235-256 Bumgarner, John 49 W – Miller NC NC NC Clarcy 34 W – Wife – Keeping house TN NC NC Linsey 14 W – Son – Assisting in Mill NC NC TN Phidella 8 W – Son “ “ “ Mary 5 W – Daughter “ “ “ Tennisee 3 W – Daughter “ “ “ Missouria 1 W – Daughter “ “ “ 236-257 Moore, Putt 50 B – Farm Laborer GA GA GA Mariah 37 B – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Wells, Major 30 M -- NC --- --- 237-258 Love, Robt. 51 M – Farmer NC NC TN Mariah C. 32 M – W – Keeping house NC TN TN Mary L. 13 M – Daughter – Assisting keeping house NC NC TN 238-260 Howel, Henry 52 B – Farmer NC NC NC John C. 19 B – Son -- Farm Laborer “ “ “ Lurena A. 17 B – Daughter – Keeping house “ “ “ Annie A. 14 B – Daughter – Assisting keeping house “ “ “ Tempee 12 B – Daughter – Assisting keeping house “ “ “ Liza J. 9 B – Daughter “ “ “ James T. 6 B – Son “ “ “ 238-259 Cudge, Thomas 32 B – Farmer NC NC NC Mary M. 28 B – Wife – Keeping house NC TN VA 220-240 Potts, R. P. 25 W – Farmer NC NC NC Mary A. 28 W – Sister – Keeping house “ “ “ Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 66 Ellen M. 21 W – Wife – Keeping house TN TN TN Jane V. 27 W – Sister – Assisting keeping house NC NC NC Margaret 64 W – Mother “ “ “ 221-241 Love, J. M. 50 M – Farmer NC TN TN Lucinda 34 M – Wife – Keeping house NC --- VA Sarah M. 13 M – Daughter – Assisting keeping house NC NC NC Francis 8 M – Daughter “ “ “ Jr. C. 2 M -- Son “ “ “ Nancy 85 B – Mother TN VA VA Whitmire, Robt. 19 B – Farm Laborer SC SC NC 222-242 Allen, William B. 40 W – Farmer NC NC NC Karah A. 28 W – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Hattie 6 W – Daughter “ “ “ Ida B. 4 W – Daughter “ “ “ Joseph B. 3 W – Son “ “ “ 223-243 Buchanan, W. O. 3 W – Farmer NC NC NC Harriet C. 25 W – Wife “ “ “ Jane 83 W – Mother “ “ “ Margaret 50 W – Sister – Assisting keeping house “ “ “ A. E. 26 W – Niece – Assisting keeping house “ “ “ Beck, Wilborn 17 W – Farm Laborer “ “ “ 224-244 Keener, John S. 38 W – Farmer NC TN NC Francis C. 34 W – Wife – Keeping house VA TN VA Joseph W. 14 W – Son – Farm Laborer NC NC VA Cathy V. 10 W – Daughter “ “ “ Sarah E. 9 W – Daughter “ “ “ Laura A. 7 W – Daughter “ “ “ Alace B. 6 W – Daughter “ “ “ Annie L. 4 W – Daughter “ “ “ James S. 2 W – Son “ “ “ Unnamed 1/12 W – Son “ “ “ 225-245 Messer, Jason 33 W – Farmer NC NC NC Mary 38 W – Wife – Keeping house NC GA NC Alice N. 10 W -- Daughter NC NC NC Laura B. 8 W – Daughter “ “ “ Thos. L. 6 W – Son “ “ “ Lucinda G. 4 W – Daughter “ “ “ 226-246 Worley, Rubin M. 51 B – Farm Laborer NC NC NC Mary 41 B – Wife – Keeping house “ “ “ Laura A. 14 B – Daughter – assisting keeping house “ “ “ William D. 12 B – Son – Farm Laborer “ “ “ Ann C. 10 B – Daughter “ “ “ Harris, Fanny 60 B -- “ “ “ -247 Worley, Goblin V. 63 B – Farmer NC NC NC Daiphin 15 B – Wife “ “ “ Franklin S. 2 B – Son “ “ “ Unnamed 2/12 B -- Daughter “ “ “ Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 67 Descendants of Archer Blanton ED: Jim McGinnis a JCGS member, graciously submitted this article and accompanying pictures the Society for use in JTJ. It will continue in further issues. vi. John A. Blanton was born about 1843. He enlisted in the Confederate Army, Capt. J. A. Russell, 1st Batt. Tenn Infantry, 1 May 1862 at Athens, Tennessee. Per Louise Blanton McDonald. vii. Elizabeth Blanton was born about 1846. viii. Jane Blanton was born about 1847. ix. Martha Blanton was born in 1849 10. Sara Blanton married James Webb on 23 May 1824 in Rutherford Co. NC. Sarah Blanton and James Webb had the following child: i. Unknown Webb died before 1850. He married Mary Unknown. She was born 1799 in NC and died after 1850. 11. Royley Blanton was born on 10 Jul 1800 in Rutherford Co., NC. He married (1) Dolly Mayes, daughter of Stith Mayes on 25 Jan 1821 in Rutherford Co. NC. He married (2) Nancy Burns on 5 Apr 1838 in Rutherford Co., NC. She was an older sister to Sarah Burns who married James Blanton, son of Royley. Notes for Royley Blanton: Royley as also known as Riley Blanton. He migrated westward in the 1840’s and settled in what is now Jackson Co., NC, according to Ruth Shuler, Blanton Forum posting #2099, 15 Jan 2002. Marriage License record 086 01 023 NC Archives: Jeremiah Blanton 2nd Bondsman, 1st was Stith Mayes and Drury Robbins was the witness. Bond #00132470. Dolly Mase’s name might have been misspelled since Stith Mayes was bondsman and her father, per his 26 Jul 1827 Will, recorded Oct 1827 in Rutherford Co. NC. Roley Blanton and Dolly Mayes had the following children: i. James Blanton was born 1822 in Rutherford Co., NC. He married Sarah Burns 28 Jan 1845 in Rutherford Co., NC. Notes for James Blanton: James was a private in CSA. He enlisted 19 Oct 1863 in Burke Co., NC, into Co. E. McRae’s Batt Cav.; On 1 Jun 1964 transferred to Co B, 34th NC Inf. On the Rolls 5 Dec 1863. He surrendered 9 Apr 1965 at Appomattox Courthouse, VA. ii. Lucinda Blanton was born 12 Aug 1823 in Rutherford Co., NC. iii. Nancy Blanton was born 1824. iv. Christenberry Blanton was born 1827 in Rutherford Co., NC. v. Alvin Robert Blanton as born 1830 in Rutherford Co., NC. Notes for Alvin Robert Blanton: Resident of Jackson Co., NC; enlisted on 20 Apr 1862 in Jackson Co., NC as a private, mustered into Co. B. 25th NC Inf. Wounded 13 Dec 1862 at Fredericksburg, VA, both ankles. Absent, wounded 28 Feb 1864. AWOL 28 Feb 1864. No further record. vi. Jeremiah Blanton was born 19 Apr 1833 in Rutherford Co., NC and died 22 Feb 1913 in Haywood Co., NC. Royley Blanton and Nancy Burns had the following children: i. Sarah Ann Blanton was born 11 Aug 1839 in Rutherford Co., NC Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 68 ii. Jasper N. Blanton was born 1842 in Rutherford Co., NC and died 21 Dec 1863 in Camp Douglas, Chicago, Illnois. iii. Catherine Blanton was born 5 May 1844 in Rutherford Co., NC iv. Susannah Blanton was born 16 Dec 1845 in Rutherford Co., NC. v. William Riley Blanton was born 26 Nov 1847 in Rutherford Co., NC. He married Depina Adeline Ensley. vi. Mary Matilda Blanton was born 8 Sep 1849 in Rutherford Co., NC. vii. Marcus Lafayette Blanton was born 25 Feb 1851 in Rutherford Co., NC. 12. Temperance Blanton was born 11 Aug 1805 in Rutherford Co., NC and died 21 Feb 1879 in Rutherford Co., NC. She married George Edwards 24 Apr 1821 in Rutherford Co, NC. He was born 21 May 1795 in NC, and died 17 Feb 1862 in Rutherford Co., NC. Notes for Temperance Blanton: Jeremiah Blanton Bible passed down to Temperance Blanton Edwards. In 1986, owned by Mrs. C. A. Kennedy, Ellenboro, NC. Family history lists Jeremiah & Sarah Blanton plus children, dates of birth and some spouses On 11 Dec 1986, Mrs. Kennedy very graciously sent copies of 1833 copyright sheet plus family history sheets. Marriage license: NC Archives, Record 086 01 081 Bond # 000133289. Bondsman John Edwards, 2nd Bondsman, Jeremiah Blanton. Temperance Blanton and George Edwards had the following child: i. Biddie Edwards was born 1842. She married James Cooper. 13. Josiah Blanton was born 13 Aug 1808 in Rutherford Co., NC and died 9 Jul 1870 in Ely, Texas. He is buried in Porter Cemetery, Fannin County, Texas. He married (1) Mary Bridges 18 Jan 1831. She died Jan 1832. She is buried Blanton Cemetery, Rutherford Co., NC. He married (2) Lucy Westbrook, daughter of Howell Westbrook and Rebecca Stroud, 14 Feb 1833 in Rutherford Co., NC. She was born 21 Apr 1812 in Spartanburg District, SC, and died 14 Oct 1903. She is buried in Porter Cemetery, Fannin County, Texas. Notes for Josiah Blanton: Josiah Blanton was a veteran of the Cherokee Indian Wars in 1838, serving with Capt. Irvin’s Company G under Col. J. G. Bynum, of the 78th Regiment of NC Volunteers. He married Mary Bridges on 18 Jul 1831, but she and their only child died in childbirth. He later married Lucy Westbrook. They moved from North Carolina in 1851, first to Tennessee then to Missouri in 1855. They eventually ended up in Texas by 1856. Following the advice of pioneer Joseph Boone, a nephew of Daniel Boone, who had settled in 1842 near present day Randolph, Texas, the Blanton family arrived in Fannin County, and purchased land east of Whitewright on 9 Dec 1856. A log cabin was built and Josiah spent the rest of his life there. During the Civil War, two of their sons, Jeremiah and Marion Howell, were killed in the Battle of Cornith, Mississippi, on 4 Oct 1862 When last seen, one was carrying the other off the battlefield when both were slain and fell side by side. Following is a portion of Pension Application #3344 for Lucy Blanton in 1892-1894. She was paid at the Knoxville Agency commencing 27 Jul 1892. On 22 May 1892, Lucy Blanton applied for a pension from Josiah’s service in the Indian Wars. She stated that he enlisted 1 May 1838 in Capt. Irvin’s Company, Col. J. G. Bynum 78th Regimnt of the NC volunteers. He was discharged at Asheville, NC 7 Jul 1838. That he died in Fannin Co., TX 9 Jul 1870. That she was married under the name Lucy Westbrook, to Josiah on 14 Feb 1833 by Rev. John Padgitt, in Rutherford Co., NC; that her husband had been previously married, but she was deceased prior to their marriage and they had no children under 16 years of age; that her husband never applied or received pension during his life time. A certified copy of marriage license of 12 Feb 1833, Josiah Blanton to Lucy Westbrook. Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 69 Affidavit of Ransom Blanton, of Rutherford Co., NC whose address is Ellenboro, NC; who was well acquainted with Lucy Blanton for 60 years, and was present at her marriage to Josiah Blanton, that they were married about 1830 and lived together until his death about 20 years ago (this was filed 1893), and that they were married by a John Padgett a Baptist Minister, at the residence of Newell ? Westbrook in Rutherford Co., NC. Deposition of Stephen Fletcher Blanton of Fannin Co., TX, age 73 in 1894: states that Mary Blanton the first wife of Josiah Blanton died Jan 1832, states “I saw her body taken from the house where she died and was present at her burial in the Blanton Graveyard in Rutherford Co., NC. I came to Texas in Jan 1871, months after the death of Josiah.” (Stephen was Josiah’s brother.) Article from unknown newspaper transcribed by Ruth Hasten Walsh; copy of transcription provided by Dorothy Latimer, Trenton, TX. BLANTON, Josiah (1808-1876) a native of North Carolina, settled west of Leonard in 1857. His wife was Sarah (sic- should read Lucy) Westbrook Blanton (1814-1903) a native of South Carolina, they raised a family of 11 o their farm. Two of their sons became preachers and two ere Civil War soldiers who were killed in battle. Children of Josiah and Sarah (sic) Blanton were Marion and Jeremiah, both killed in 1862 in the Civil War; George W. (b. 1837) who was married to Rebecca Cox; Thomas J. ho was married to a Miss Locke and later to a Miss Smith; Louisa, who married a Coffee; Nancy, who married John Dameron; Eli H. (1845-1867); Temperance, who married J. Robinson; and Sarah (b 1852) who married W. H. Gilliam of Savoy. Two sons; Benjamin (1838-1917) and Zachariah became preachers. Zachariah lived and died in Blanket, Texas. The Rev. Benjamin Blanton received his license in 1872 to preach for the Methodist Church and founded Blanton’s Chapel. His wife was Sarah L. Boone Blanton. Notes for Lucy Blanton: Lucy appears in the 1900 Census, Fannin County, Texas, living with daughter Temperance and her husband, Lee Robinson. Lucy is shown as age 88, born Apr 1812 in SC, mother of 11, 7 still living in 1900. OBITUARY: From unknown newspaper, transcribed by Ruth Hasten Walsh copy of transcription provided by Dorothy Latimer, Trenton, TX. BLANTON, Mrs. Lucy Blanton (nee Westbrook) was born in Spartanburg District, South Carolina, April 12, 1812; married Josiah Blanton in Feb 1833. She professed religion when but a girl; joined the church in Texas with her husband under the pastorate of Rev. G. S Gatewood. Soon after the war she and her husband moved from North Carolina to East Tennessee, near Knoxville, in the year 1852; from there to Missouri in 1855; thence to Texas in 1856, and located in Fannin County. Thus ends the brief life of ninety-one years. About seventy years of her life as spent in service of God and Church. Sister Blanton was the mother of eleven children; four of these have preceded her to the great invisible beyond. She has sixty-four grandchildren; twenty five of these are dead; great-grandchildren, seventy, and thirteen of these are dead. Two of Sister Blanton’s sons are ministers of the gospel. Rev. B. F. Blanton is an honored local preacher in our church; a strong preacher he is. She has another son who is an acceptable preacher in the C. P. Church out in western Texas. Sister Blanton was a good and true woman; she loved God and the Church; did all she could for suffering humanity for many long years; the sick-room was her stronghold. She was a kind physician among the female sex for many long years. She spent much time day and night trying to cure the sick and relieve the suffering. Besides all this, she was kind and good to poor people, always reaching out the hand to those who were in need and want. So I am sure after this long and beautiful Christian life is ended, she is at rest in heaven. As too what estimation was put upon her was attested by the mighty concourse of people gathered at her funeral service held at Porter Graveyard in Fannin County. May the good Lord bless and keep her children, grandchildren and all her relatives to everlasting life, and one day may they meet her in the sun-bright clime beyond the stars, where goodbyes are never heard and farewells are unknown. W. B. Bayless, Pastor, Trenton, Texas SOURCES OF INFORMATION: 1. Nadine Blanton, 310 W. Middleton Sherman, TX 75090. 2. Temperance Blanton Bible, owned by Mrs. C. A. Kennedy, Ellenboro, NC. 3. Pension #3344 Indian Wars, p. 10 NC Pension Abstracts, Vol. 6, by Annie Burns 4. NC Marriages, Microfiche files, OK Historical Building, Oklahoma City, OK Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 70 5. Lea Ann Vaughn, 1992 address: 309 E. Taliaferro, Madill, OK 73446 6. Earnest E. Walt, 5017 Barcelona, Garland, TX 75043 (1991) 7. Ruth Hasten Walsh 8. 1860 Census Fannin County, Texas, Bonham Post Office pg 204 9. 1870 Census Fannin County, Texas, Bonham Post Office pg 178B Josiah Blanton and Lucy Westbrook had the following children: i. Jeremiah Blanton was born 13 Dec 1833 in Rutherford Co., NC and died 4 Oct 1862 at the Battle of Cornith, Alcorn Co., MS. ii. Marion Howell Blanton was born 1 May 1835 in Rutherford Co. NC and died 4 Oct 1862 at the Battle of Cornith, Alcorn Co., MS. iii. George Washington Blanton was born 16 Jan 1837 in Rutherford Co., NC and died 1 Dec 1924. He married Rebecca Lavinia Cox, daughter of Burrell Cox and Rebecca Elizabeth Lindsey, about 1871. She was born 24 Sep 1847 in Randolph, Texas and died 3 May 1920. Notes for George Washington Blanton: 1860 Census Fannin Co., TX pg 204 living with parents 1870 Census Fannin Co, TX pg 178B living with parents 1900 Census Fannin Co., TX pg 154A family 281 G. W. born 1837 NC, age 63, parents born NC; Wife Vina, born Sep 1847, TX, parents born Arkansas; Nonia, daughter born Jun 1885, age 14, born TX; William Reed, son-in-law born Aug 1873, Ark, parents born Ark: Mattie, daughter, born Nov 1876, TX age 23 SOURCES OF INFORMATION: 1. Nadine Blanton 2. George Cole letter of 1 Mar 1986 iv. Benjamin Franklin Blanton was born 24 Sep 1838 in Rutherford Co., NC and died 28 Apr 1917 I Bochito, OK. He married Sarah Lucretia Boone, daughter of Joseph Boone and Virginia E. M. Crenshaw on 18 Nov 1861 in Randolph, Fannin Co., TX. She was born 23 Mar 1846 in Texas and died 19 Jan 1902 in Randolph, Fannin Co., TX. Notes for Benjamin Franklin Blanton: Benjamin was born in North Carolina. He was a twin brother to Thomas Jefferson Blanton, Benjamin age 21 appears in the 1860 Census, Bonham Post Office, Fannin Co., TX, pg. 204, living with his parents. During the Civil war, he served n Co. C. 1st Regiment, Arizona Brigade, Partisan Rangers, 31st Texas Cavalry. He was shown as age 24 in the muster rolls for 22 Sep 1862 to 30 Apr 1863. After the close of the war, Benjamin bought land west of Leonard here his family had settled. The land deed bears the signature of Gov. John Ireland. Ben F. Blanton and family appear in the 1870 Census, Bonham Post Office, Fannin Co., TX, pg 178B: Ben F. 32 y born NC Sarah 25 y born TX Lucy 7 y born TX Marion 4 y born TX Edwin 2 y born TX Evaline 1/12 y born TX Some of the land he bought adjoins the Blanton Chapel Church, which was founded in 1872 by Benjamin Blanton. When he was licensed to preach in 1872, he preached there 18 years during which time he gave large sums of money for the church upkeep. In 1895, the church property was accepted by the North Texas Conference of the Methodist Church. In April 1917, the chapel was damaged by a severe storm. The rectangular building which had been added onto from the original building was torn down and rebuilt. Much of the original lumber was used in rebuilding the new church. Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 71 1936 Jackson County Death Certificates of Persons Born 1900 – 1936 [Key to reading the following: Name of deceased; Date of birth; Place of birth; 1936 date of death; Father’s name; Father’s place of birth; Mother’s name; Mother’s place of birth; Informant’s name; Informant’s address; Cemetery. Abstracted by Sanji Talley Watson in the Jackson County Register of Deeds Office 2015.] Webster Beck, Janeve; 29 My 1936; Jackson Co.; 25 Jan; E. D. Beck; Jackson Co.; Willie Mae Stillwell; Jackson Co,; Gene Beck; Webster; Stillwell Madison, William H.; 28 Oct 1902; Webster; 16 Jun 1936; Robert Lee Madison; Stanton, VA; Ella Virginia Richards; Galveston, TX; Monroe Madison; Sylva; Cullowhee Hyatt, Hattie Mae Fisher; w/o Charles; 27 y, 1 m, 23 d; Webster; 1 Sep; John Fisher; Webster; Florence Love Fisher; Webster; John Henry Fisher; Webster; Parris Sylva Mathis, Lewis Junior; 7 d; Sylva; 7 Jan; Jessie Mathis; Sylva; Della Mae Smith; Waynesville; Jesse Mathis; Sylva; Old Field Crisp, Caleb Judson; 33 y, 3 m, 29 d; Jackson Co.; 2 Mar; W. Thomas Crisp; Graham Co.; Harriett Jones; Jackson Co.; Gaither Crisp; Highlands; Zion Hill Painter, Jerry D.; 9 y, 2 m; Sylva; 15 Mar; Robert Painter; Macon Co.; Ruth Brendle; Macon Co.; Robert Painter; Sylva; Franklin, NC Morgan, William Daniel; 11 Apr 1936; Sylva; 11 Apr; Ottis Morgan; Sylva; Jerdie Shuler; Greens Creek; Ottis Morgan; Sylva; Sylva Worley, Bert; Sep 1935; Sylva; 12 Apr 1936; ng; Della Worley; Sylva; Lee Worley; Sylva; Parris Gibbs, Geraline; 3 May 1936; Sylva; 9 May; William A. Gibbs; Walhalla, SC; Mellie Robinson; Sylva; William A. Gibbs; Sylva; Lovedale Worley, Della; May 1920; Sylva; 27 May 1936; Lee Worley; Sylva; Bessie Bryson; Sylva; Lee Worley; Sylva; Parris Moody, Hyatt Arthur; h/o Mary Fannie; 19 y, 11 m, 8 d; Sylva;8 Jun ; Hyatt Moody; Erastus; Martha Matilda Pruitt; Jackson Co.; Hyatt Moody; Sylva; Love Chapel Guffey, Eva Lavada; w/o Charlie; 14 Jun 1903; Sylva; 31 Jul; John M. Dillard; Jackson Co,; Dora Holland; Buncobe Co.; Charlie Guffey; Sylva; Sylva Hoyles, Charles Coleman; 11 Ju 936; Sylva; 7 Oct; Sylva; Walter Hoyles; Willets; Jensy Hall; Greens Creek; Walter Hoyles; Sylva; Greens Creek Lay, Minnie; 2 Feb 1936; Sylva; 2 Feb; Lester Lay; Sylva; Stella Worley; Sylva; Lester Lay; Sylva; Dillsboro Sims, Betty Lou; Jun 1933; Sylva; 28 Mar; M. O. Sims; Helen, GA; Molly Flain; Helen, GA; M. O. Sims; Sylva; Helen, GA Miller, Azalee; 30 Nov 1933; NC; 2 Feb; E. D. Miller; NC; Julia O’Kelly; GA; E. D. Miller; Sylva; Wilmot Lay, Minnie; 2 Feb 1936; Sylva; 7 Feb; Lester Lay; Sylva; Stella Worley; Sylva; Lester Lay; Sylva; Dillsboro Sumner, Harry; 1 Jun 1928; Cherokee Co.; 30 Mar; Crawford Sumner; Buncombe Co.;; Nannie Tatham; Cherokee Co.; Crawford Sumner; Sylva; Andrews, NC Gibson, Ralph Ellison, Jr.; 6 Aug 1923; Bryson City; 28 Feb; Ralph Edison Gibson, Sr.; Bryson City; Nol C. Christian; WVA; R. E. Gibson; Bryson City; Bryson City McFalls, Bill; 4 Dec 1925; Glenville; 22 May; Herschel McFalls; GA; Floda Hooper; NC; Herschel McFalls; Glenville; Glenville Garrett, Annie Josephine; 27 Jun 1917; Sylva; 16 Jun; R. U. Garrett; Caney Fork; Joyce S. Dills; Sylva; Nita Garrett; Sylva; Sylva Clark, Jessie Park; h/o Clara; 19 May 1910; Clay Co.; 22 Jun; George Clark; Lumpkin Co. GA; Dora Ledford; Clay Co.; Monroe Clark; Murphy; Grandview McDonald, Patsy; 23 Feb 1936; Sylva; 26 Feb; James McDonald; Jackson Co.; Francess Dorsey; (Unreadable); James McDonald; Sylva; Dillsboro Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 72 Bumgarner, Carl Lloyd; 25 Mar 1905; Sylva; 29 Jun; Geo. E. Bumgarner; Sylva; Margaret Clark; Macon Co; Geo. E. Bumgarner; Sylva; Lovesdale Walker, William Ray; Apr 1931; Fontana, NC; 14 Jun; J. E. Walker; Severe Co., TN; Gertrude Fleming; Clay Co.; J. E. Walker; Fontana; Fontana Carden, John Lyndon; h/o Irene Ashe; 6 Aug 1913; Sylva; 31 May; Arthur Craden; Macon Co.; Agnes Pruett Haywood Co.; Arthur Carden; Sylva; Loves Chapel Quiett, Louise Niel; 10 Jan 1925; Whittier; 11 Jul; Hubert Quiett; Whittier; Niel Andle; Bryson City; Mrs. R. L. Hyatt; Whitier; Bryson City Gardner, Adeno Earnest; w/o Fletcher; 17 Dec 1906; Tazewell, VA; 14 Sep; J. W. Earnest; VA; Mary Cadwell; VA Fletcher Gardner; Bartow, FL; Alexander, VA Middleton, Alvin Levi; h/o Eula Shook; 15 Apr 1907; East a Porte; 16 Aug; J. Hut Middleton; East La Porte; Amanda Brown; Argura; J. Hut Middleton; East La Porte; Wolf Mountain Bumgarner, Georgia Mella; 13 Jul 1916; Jackson Co.; 18 Nov; Ray Bumgarner; Jackson Co.; Lela Taylor; Jackson Co.; Mrs. Ray Bumgarner; Glenville; Glenville Allison, Albert Lucius h/o Beulah Styles; 7 Jul 1905; Haywood Co.; 26 Nov; J. D. Allison; Haywood Co.; Mary Howell; Haywood Co.; Mrs. Albert L. Allison; Dillsboro; Qualla Nicholson, Annie Lou; w/o Garl; 32 y, 9 m, 22 d; Greenville, SC; 16 Nov; Ben Neighbors; ng; ng; ng; Garl Nicholson; Cowarts; Cowarts Norman, Mary Catherine; 2 Dec 1936; Sylva; 2 Dec; Chas. Wm. Norman; Webster; Evelyn Smith; Syva; Chas. M. Norman; Sylva; Dillsboro Moses, Claude; 23 Jan 1913; Jackson Co.; 6 Dec; Will Moses; Macon Co.; Fannie Keener; Macon Co.; Co. 426 Record; Ravensford, NC; Gneiss, NC Burris, Willie Charles; 15 Oct 1919; Judson, NC; 23 Sep; George Burris; Barkesville, KY; Myrtle Burns; Japan, NC; George Burris; Japan, NC; Japan, NC Cotter, Betty; 23 Feb 1927; Cullowhee; 14 Dec; H. T. Cotter; Laurens, SC; Edna N. Buchanan; Cullowhee; H. T. Cotter; Cullowhee; Cullowhee Camby, Oscar Lee; 13 Dec 1919; Swain Co.; 6 Dec; Walter Camby; Swain Co.; Belle Longbottom; Swain Co.; Walter Camby; Sylva; Beta Scotts Creek Mathis, Bethel D.; 12 hours; NC; 2 Feb; ng; ng; Pollie Mills; NC; Reuben Frady; Sylv; Addie Scarborough, Euell Edgar; 28 y, 10 d; Oliver Springs, TN; 6 May 1937 (Filed); W. B. Scarborough; TN; Isa Davidson; IN; W. H. Scarborough; TN; Oliver Springs. TN Cagle, Jensie; 2 days; NC; 13 Jun; Charlie Austin; Sylva; Bell Hoyle; Sylva; Charlie Austin; Sylva; Willets Mills, Infant Boy; 4 days; NC; 26 Apr; Unreadable Mills; Glenville; Lessie Sutton; Sylva; Dennis Melton; Sylva; Willets Jones, Mary Cecil; 21 Sep 1936; NC; 6 Dec; Jesse Van Jones; Sylva; Gerlie Henry; Sylva; Jesse Van Jones; Sylva; Addie Savannah Bishop, Grady Hermon;10 m, 4 d; NC; 4 Jul; Gradger Bishop; NC; Florence Ammons; NC; L. A. Pressley; Gay; Zion Hill Frady, Elzie R.; 2 m, 18 d; Jackson Co.; 6 Sep; Garland Frady; Jackson Co.; Carrie Franks; Jackson Co.; Arch Cowan; Greens Creek; East Fork Woodard, Maxine; 2 months; Jackson Co.; 1 Oct; Lester Woodard; GA; Villa Ridley; NC; Lester Woodard; Gay; Zion Hill Buchanan, Harold Dean; ng; ng; 9 Oct; ng; ng; Earie Mae Buchanan; Jackson Co.; C. W. Deitz; Greens Creek; East Fork River Middleton, Josephine; 31 Dec 1933; Tuckasegee; 3 Jan; Spurgeon Middleton; Tuckasegee; Della Watson; Tuckasegee; Joe Middleton; Tuckasegee; Tuckasegee Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 73 Qualla Carver, Lettie; 14 Jul 1916; Swain Co.; 10 Jul; Buck Carver; TN; Laura Carver; TN; R. C. Howell; Whittier; Hyatt Patton, Jack; 2 Mar 1912; Graham Co.; 21 Dec; R. T. Patton; Jackson Co.; Minnie Keener; Jackson Co.; H. J. Bird; Sylva; Whittier Mountain Houston, Wanda Araleen; 4 m, 10 d; Jackson Co.; 10 Mar; Lee Houston; Jackson Co.; Birdie Moss; Jackson Co.; Birdie Houston; Erastus; Pine Creek Hamburg Young, Sayreta Eugenia; 19 Jan 1936; Glenville; 20 Jan; Marvin Brown; Tuckasegee; Rosella Young; Tuckasegee; Rosella Young; Glenville; Glenville Bryson, Edwin Carl; 3 May 1918; Glenville; 3 Jan; John B. Bryson; NC; Myria Buchanan; NC; John B. Bryson; Glenville; Glenville McFalls, Thomas Lewis; 17 Jan 1936; NC; 23 Apr; William Hershel McFalls; Towns Co., GA; Floda Minerva Hooper; NC; Hershel William McFalls; Glenville; Glenville Moody, Calvine; 2 Nov 1936; Glenville; 23 Mar; Manuel Moody; NC; Elizabeth Burrell; Transylvania Co.; Manuel Moody; Glenville; Erastus Moore, Boobie La Vaine; 31 Oct 1936; Glenville; 22 Nov; Vass Moore; Anderson, SC; Maxine Bryans; Orange Co., NC; Vass Moore; Glenville; Glenville Greens Creek Buchanan, Edward Olin; 22 Aug 1934; Jackson Co.; 11 Nov; Verlin Buchanan; Jackson Co.; Larah McClour; Jackson Co.; Verlin Buchanan; Greens Creek; Savannah Dillsboro Estes, Infant Boy; 20 Feb 1936; Dillsboro; 20 Feb; Abe Estes; Dillsboro; Margaret Conner; Dillsboro; Henry Conner; Dillsboro; ng Robinson, Infant Girl; 29 Feb 1936; Dillsboro; George Robinson; Dillsboro; Manda Dills; Dilsboro; George Robinson; ng; Franklin Wells, John Winfordl 28 Nov 1936; Dillsboro; 14 Mar James Wells; Dillsboro; Katherin Love; Dillsboro; Harley Love; Dillsboro; Dillsboro Wells, Lidea; 7 y, 2 m, 20 d; Jackson Co.; 1 Sep; James Wells; Dillsboro; Katherin Love; NC; Will Love; Dillsboro; Parris Dills, Charles Samuel; ng; Dillsboro; 15 Dec; Earnest Dills; Dillsboro; Mattie Jacobs; Dillsboro; Grace Parks; Dillsboro; Parris Cullowhee Taylor, Jessie Ray; 22 hours; Speedwell; 1 Jan (Burial); Otis Clingman Taylor; Speedwell; Lala Lee West; Transylvania Co.; Otis Clingman Taylor; ng; Speedwell Ashe, Infant Boy; 21 Apr 1936; Cullowhee; 21 Apr; George Lee Ashe; Cullowhee; Minnie Ethel Potts; Cullowhee; George Lee Ashe; Cullowhee; Cullowhee Dills, William B.; 31 Dec 1930; Cullowhee; 6 Jun; Delos Dills; Jackson Co.; Emiline Blanton; Jackson Co.; Delos Dills; Cullowhee; Black Mountain Bishop, Bonnie; 35 y, 1 m, 21 d; Cullowhee; 22 Jun; Neal Bishop; Cullowhee; Bertie Hooper; Cullowhee; Sarahie Bishop; Cullowhee; Cullowhee Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 74 Caney Fork Melton, Lucy; 14 Jul 1936; Canada Ts.; 1 Oct; Lambert Melton; Canada Ts.; Lonie Kilby; Rabun Co., GA; Inis Watson; Cowarts; Balsam Grove Phillips, Gordon Hutson; 20 Aug 1935; Cowarts; 12 Nov; Luther Phillips; Cowarts; Catherine Coward; Cowarts; Woodie Hooper; Cowarts; Brasstown Hooper, Weldon; 10 Jan 1936; Moses Creek; 25 Nov; Newel Hooper; Brasstown; Flossie Wood; Moses Creek; Vance Hooper; East La Porte; Moses Creek Ensley, Infant Boy; 16 Dec 1936; Cowarts; 16 Dec; Ervin Ensley; Cullowhee; Amanda Parker; Cowarts; Sam Parker; Cowarts; Balsam Grove Canada Wood, Glenda; 8 m, 9 d; Argura; 11 Jan; Earl Wood; Wolf Mountain; Lela Ash; Argura; John Broom; Argura; Broom Ashe, Evelyn; 8 y; Argura; 12 Jan; Flem Ashe; Argura; Effie Ash; Argura; John Broom; Argura; Broom Melton, Mamie Blanch; 14 m; Jackson Co.; 7 Mar; Claud Melton; Jackson Co.; Bular Hoxit; Jackson Co.; Claud Melton; Argura; Broom Reese, Florence; 22 y, 6 m, 10 d; Jackson Co.; 13 Jun; Wess Reese; Haywood Co.; Lula Reese; Jackson Co.; Wess Reese; Argura; Canada Rider, Oliver; 25 y; Haywood Co.; 30 Aug; John Rider; Kentucky; Jane Sherrill; Madison Co., NC; John Rider; Waynesville; Saunook Barkers Creek Wilkey, Nellie Joe; 18 Aug 1936; Dillsboro; 3 Dec; Joe Wilkey; Dillsboro; Mellie D. Jones; Barkers Creek; Joe Wilkey; Dillsboro; Barkers Creek Ward, Arthur Fred; 3 y, 2 , 6 d; Barkers Creek; 9 Mar; Narlie Ward; NC; Lula Ashe; NC; N. W. Ward; Whittier; Wilmot Stanford, Leonard; 45 hours; ng; 7 Apr; James Stanford; Barkers Creek; Mordia Franklin; NC; General Jones; Whittier; Barkers Creek Willis, Marie; 3 y, 5 m, 1 d; Swain Co.; 18 Sep; Herman Willias; NC; Ethel Hyatt; NC; H. J. Willis; Whittier; Bryson City Continuation of The Man Who Gave Sylva Its Name 26. Probably Cornelius Buchanan, born 20 Apr 1868. He was the brother of Marcellus Buchanan. The 1910 census listed a Cornelius Buchanan, age 42, born in NC living in Oregon, Lane County, Florence Precinct, and married to Katie, all of the family had been born in North Carolina. The 1920 census had Cornelius O. Buchanan, age 52, born in NC, in Oregon, Lane County, Florence Pct., married to Katie. 27. Mary J. Long, age 20, married M. H. Morris, age 27, on 1 Jan 1890 (Marriage Bonds of Haywood and Jackson Counties, North Carolina, p. 103). Manos Hanley Morris and Mary Jane Long operated the Commercial Hotel in Sylva, but T. H. Hastings owned the hotel when it burned 6 Apr 1923, (Jackson County Heritage, Vol. II, pp. 3-4, 245). “Manos Hanley, born in 1860, married Mary Long of Jackson County and they had two sons, John Hanley and William Jackson.” Manos and Mary are buried in Webster Cemetery (Jackson County Heritage, Vol. I, p. 359). Both M. H. Morris (15 Mar 1862 – 6 Apr 1923) and Mary Long Morris (23 May 1869 – 22 Jun 1954) are buried in the Webster Cemetery. (Cemeteries of Jackson County, p.394) 28. An obituary for Felix Leatherwood notes he had a daughter, “(Lee) Mrs. R. P. Potts.” Lillian Lee Leatherwood was born 13 Feb 1872 (Jackson County Heritage, Vol. I, p. 317). An online Ancestry source says Lillian Lee Leatherwood (1872-?), daughter of Felix Harrison and Annie Lavenia Carter Leatherwood, married R. P. Potts. The Find a Grave website has her dates as 13 Feb 1872 – 12 Jun 1960, and buried in Green Hills Cemetery, Asheville. The spouse is listed as Rufus Penland Potts (1854 – 1937). 29. The 1920 census listed an Alfred M. Parker, age 66, born in North Carolina, and then residing in Polk County, Arkansas, White Township. 30. The 1880 census lists Henry P. Brendle, age 30, living in Webster, with the occupation of sheriff. The 1900 census lists Henry P. Brendle, age 51, of Oklahoma in Cleveland Little River Township. The entire Brendle family was born in North Carolina. Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 75 Doctor’s Daily Journal ED: Recently member Anna Frazier brought the 1915 Daily Journal of Dr. C. Z. Chandler to our attention. We have decided to publish the days that he has completed in the journal. This is a continuation of the journal. All spelling and abbreviations are as written in book. Transcribed 2015 by Sanji Talley Watson. DATE WEATHER PATIENT PAYMENT COSTS Apr 10 Clear & warm Aaron Bryson – for visit 10.00 Henry Brogden – for visit 5.00 Mr. Williamson – for visit 3.00 Apr 11 Cloudy & rain Sam Davis – for visit 10.00 10.00 Jas. Anderson – tub inj. 1.00 1.00 – by cash .50 Apr 12 Cloudy & cool D. W. Deweese – for visit 20.00 20.00 -- incidental 1.00 1.00 Apr 13 Clear & cool Jno. Wilson – Prof. Services for wife 10.00 10.00 Apr 14 Clear & warm F. A. Luck – for 2 visits 2.00 Apr 15 Clear & warm Mr. Luck – for visit 1.00 J. L. Lequire – for 3 visits 3.00 J. A. Monteith – for visit 1.50 Apr 16 Clear & cool Sam Davis – for visit 10.00 10.00 J. A. Monteith – for visit 1.50 -- incidental 5.00 5.00 Thad Beard – for visit 2.00 Apr 17 Clear & cool Mr. Luck – for visit 1.00 O. V. Cagle – for v. urinalysis 2.00 J. H. Buchanan – for urinalysis 1.00 Mrs. C. H. Daniels – for tub. inj. 1.00 Apr 18 Clear & warm Mr. Luck – for visit 1.00 Jas. Anderson – for tub. inj. 1.00 Apr 20 Clear & warm Wes Green – prof. services for wife 10.00 10.00 Mr. Luck – for visit 1.00 Apr 21 Cloudy & warm Dill Jones – prof. Services for wife 10.00 10.00 Jim Dehart – for visit 1.00 1.00 Hanley Bryson – for visit 1.50 Apr 22 Cloudy & warm Mr. Luck – for visit 1.00 Walter Bryson – visit for mother 1.00 Joe McKinney – for visit & ex 2.00 Chas. Mason – for visit 1.00 Apr 23 Cloudy & warm Merrick Green – for visit 4.00 Mick Green – for visit 4.00 -- incidental 5.00 5.00 Chas. Mason – for tub. inj. 1.00 Harley Bryson – for visit 1.50 Apr 24 Cloudy & warm Jno. Buchanan – for visit 2.00 2.00 Mrs. Lela Moore – for 3 visits 6.00 Thos, Brooks – for 2 visits 10.00 -- incidentals 7.00 1.00 Apr 25 Clear, cloudy & warm Thos. Brooks – Prof. services for daughter 6.00 10.00 Mrs. Lela Moore – for 2 visits 5.00 Apr 26 Clear, cloudy & warm Mrs. Lela Moore – incidental 1.00 1.00 Mr. Luck – for visit 1.00 Harley Bryson – for visit 5.00 1.50 Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 76 L. B. Sutton – for visit 3.00 3.00 Merril Green – for visit 2.00 6.00 Apr 27 Cloudy & rainy Hanley Bryson – for visit 1.50 Mrs. Lela Moore – for visit 2.50 Jas. Anderson – for tub. inj. 1.00 1.00 Jno Wilson – for visit 2.50 -- incidental 7.00 7.00 Apr 28 Clear & warm Mrs. Lela Moore – for visit 2.50 Apr 29 Clear & warm Frank Holden – Prof. services for self 10.00 25.00 Mrs. Lela Moore – for visit 2.50 Lawrence Cowan – for visit 3.00 Apr 30 Cloudy & warm Chas. Mason – for tub. inj. 1.00 Mrs. Lela Moore – for visits 3.00 Jas. Cowan – for visit 1.00 Month of April 171.25 406.50 May 1 Frank Rhinehart – by cash ½ .50 Merril Green – for visit 5.00 Mrs. Lela Moore – for visit 2.00 Jas. Anderson – for tub. inj. 1.00 1.00 Harley Bryson – for visit 1.50 May 2 Cloudy & rainy Mrs. Lela Moore – for visit 2.00 Lawrence Cowan – for visit 2.00 Chas. Mason – for visit 1.50 May 3 James Ensley – ½ 5.00 Frank Clause – ½ 2.50 Jim Sutton – ½ 9.00 Thos. Brooks – for visit 5.00 H. M. Bumgarner – for visit & urinalysis 2.00 May 4 Cloudy & cool Jas. Jones – Prof services for wife 7.00 10.00 Swartz Brooks – ½ 3.00 Mr. Murphy – Prof services for son 3.00 3.00 May 5 Clear & cool --Incidental 2.00 2.00 Hanley Bryson – for visit 1.50 Lee Conley – for visit 2.00 Hanley Bryson – for visit 1.50 Mrs. Lela Moore – for visit 2.00 May 6 H. H. Wood – ½ 6.25 Mrs. Joseph Baker – ½ 5.00 Hanley Bryson – for visit 1.50 F. A. Luck – for visit 1.00 -- incidental 1.00 1.00 Jackson Co. – ½ 5.00 Thos. Messer – ½ 5.00 Robt. Hatcher – ½ 1.50 May 7 Cloudy & rain Thos. Brooks – for visit 6.00 Wm. Morgan – prof services for boy 6.00 May 8 Rain & warm W. V. Davis – ½ 1.25 Jas. Brooks – ½ 7.00 Charlie Allison – ½ 3.00 Jas. Anderson – prof services for self 4.00 4.00 Frank Rhinehart – for tub. inj. 1.00 1.00 Chas. Mason – for tub. inj. 1.00 W. R. Sherrill – for visit 2.50 Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 77 May 9 Clear & cool Thos. Brooks – for visit 5.00 Jno. Cagle – for visit 1.00 Hanley Bryson – for visit 1.50 Wm. Morgan – for visit 2.00 May 10 Clear & cool Lee Pangle –(seven Sutton oed) –by cash ½ 10.00 Will Smith – by cash ½ 47.50 Jackson Co. – prof services for Arthur Dills 2.00 May 11 Cloudy & rainy Mr. Luck – for visit 1.00 Jenkins – for visit 1.00 Merril Green – for visit 5.00 May 12 Dick Martin – ½ .50 Mr. Luck – for visit 1.00 Mrs. Parker – for visit 1.00 7.50 Dallas Henry – prof services for self 10.00 Wm. Morgan – by cash on account 5.00 May13 Clear & warm Jno. Lewis – for visits 4.00 Mr. Luck – for visits 2.00 W. H. Jones – for visit 1.00 Jake Wild – for visit 2.00 Tom Brooks – for visit 6.00 May 14 Jim Ammons – ½ 2.50 Hanley Bryson – by cash ½ 2.50 Chas. Mason – for tub, inj. 1.00 May 15 Clear & warm Jas. Anderson – for tub. inj. 1.00 1.00 Frank Rhinehart – for tub. inj. 1.00 1.00 Jno. Lewis – for visit 3.00 Henderson Jones – for visit 6.00 Robt. Clayton – for tub. inj. 1.00 May 16 Clear & warm Coleman Cannon – prof services for wife 10.00 Jno. Lewis – for visit 3.00 Joe Davis – for ex wife 2.00 May 17 A. B. Shuler – for visit 6.00 6.00 -- for urinalysis 1.00 May 18 Clear & warm --- incidentals 5.00 5.00 May 19 Cloudy & rain Len Wilson – prof services for wife 25.00 -- incidentals 1.00 1.00 May 20 Cloud & warm Jno. A. Buchanan – Prof services for wife 6.00 10.00 M. Y. Jarrett – for visit 2.00 May 21 Warm & cloudy Fannie Sutton – for visit 2.00 3.00 -- incidental 1.00 1.00 T. H. Hastings – for visit 2.00 May 22 Cole Buchanan – ½ 5.00 Robt. Clayton – for tub. inj. 1.00 Jno. Anderson – for tub. inj. 1.00 1.00 Frank Rhinehart – for tub. inj. 1.00 1.00 Chas. Mason – for ub. Inj. 1.00 Mrs. C. H. Daniels – for tub. inj. 1.00 May 23 E. B. McDade – for visit 10.00 10.00 J. A. Paris – for visit 1.00 May 24 Ellis Beasley – for 2 visits 2.00 Sam Davis – for 2 visits 2.00 Ed McNeely – for visit 1.00 May 26 Ellis Beasley – for visit 1.00 Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 78 Mr. Luck – for visit 1.00 Rufus Jones – prof services for wife 10.00 May 28 Warm & cloudy Ed. Ensley – for visit 1.00 Cole Cannon – for visit 1.50 May 29 Warm & cloudy Chas. Mason – for tub. inj. 1.00 Jas. Anderson – for tub. inj. 1.00 1.00 Joe Davis – for visit wife 1.00 Edgar Early – for tub. inj. 1.00 Mrs. C. H. Daniels – for nib. Inj. 1.00 May 30 Cloudy & cool Jno. Reid – prof services for wife 10.00 10.00 Felix Hall – prof services for wife 10.00 10.00 Jno. Lewis – by cash in acct. 10.00 -- incidental 1.00 1.00 May 31 Cloudy & rain Geo. Lawery – ½ 1.50 Lyn Harris – ½ .50 Jno. Sutton – for visit 15.00 25.00 Lucious Watson – prof services for wife 10.00 Month of May 221.75 300.00 Jun 1 Rain & warm Lucious Watson – for visit 2.50 Jun 3 Clear & warm Lucious Watson – for visit 2.50 Jun 4 Frank Clause – ½ 1.00 Jas. Cabe – for visit 3.00 F. H. Hastings – for visit 1.50 Jun 5 Taylor Norton – ½ 1.00 Jno. A. Buchanan – ½ 1.00 Jas. Anderson – for tub. inj 1.00 1.00 Edgar Ensley – for tub. inj. 1.00 Mrs. C. H. Daniels – for tub. inj. 1.00 Frank Rhinehart – for tub. inj. 1.00 Lucious Watson – for visit 2.50 Chas. Mason – tub. inj. 1.00 Jun 6 Cloudy & cool T. F. Richards – ½ 4.50 Thos. Buchanan – for visit 5.00 Wm. Green – for visit 7.00 Lila Barker – for prof srvices 5.00 10.00 (6-11-15) by cash 5.00 Jun 7 Clear & warm Allen Sutton – for visit 5.00 John B. Bryson – ½ 2.50 Jun 10 Clear & warm Jno. Ensley – prof services for wife 5.00 10.00 Jun 11 Jas Parris – ½ 2.00 Ed. McNeely – ½ .50 Jun 12 Cloudy & rainy Frank Rhinehart – for tub. inj. 1.00 1.00 Chas. Mason – for tub. inj. 1.00 Jas. Anderson – for tub. inj. 1.00 1.00 -- incidental 2.00 2.00 F. A. Luck – for visit 1.00 L. P. Allen – visit 1.00 Jun 13 Warm & rainy Lucious Watson – for visit 2.50 Hanley Bryson – for visit 1.50 Jun 14 Warm & rain Wm. Morgan – by cash ½ 2.50 Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 79 2015 Scholarship Winners ED: The two Scott Foundation Scholarships and the first ever Robert Larry Crawford Scholarship were awarded to the following students. Congratulations to each one of them. The Scott Foundation Scholarships were awarded to Kaylee O’Dwyer and Diane Ramirez. Kaylee O’Dwyer is planning on a degree in Health/Physical Education at Pfeiffer University, with plans on becoming a teacher or administrator. She was active in Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Student Government, Interact Committee, Prom Committee, Captain of the basketball team. She was also involved in several out of school activities; working with the Fishes and Loaves Food Pantry, coat drives for needy, Humane Society and working with the Library. Diane Ramirez plans to attend the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where she will work on a degree in Chemistry/ Pre-Med. She would like to continue her education to eventually attend medical school and to become a medical scientist. She was active in school as President of the Student Council, captain of basketball and volleyball team, and being a mentor for a younger girl. She would like to participate in a Mission trip abroad, especially a medical mission trip. The first Robert “Larry” Crawford Scholarship was awarded to Corey Lee Baldwin. Corey Baldwin attends Southwestern Community College and plans to pursue a degree in Culinary Arts. He has participated in a Mission trip to Bolivia in June 2014, continues to work missions through his Church, and is also a Sunday School teacher. Left Photo: Katie O’Dwyer; Middle photo; Diane Ramirez; Right photo; Corey Baldwin Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 80 Kaylee O’Dwyer Jackson County Genealogical Society Scholarship March 18, 2015 There are many instances in which genealogical research is important. Whether it’s for philosophical or practical reasons, individuals are able to learn about their ancestry, culture, heritage, and medical history. On the practical side of things, people may find the need to research their genealogy to find family members such as birth parents, siblings, grandparents, etc. This may be important to determine the birth parents of an adopted child, to find an adopted child, or to reconnect with family members Researching your medical history is important because you can discover and assess to risk of getting a certain medical condition that may run in your family. Some people find the need to research their family history so they can preserve their culture, traditions, and legacy. People can learn more about their family traditions and or culture so they are able to pass down their legacy and continue participating in them to possibly teach future generations. You can also trace inheritance and land ownership within a family. On the other hand, people may research their genealogy out of pure curiosity. It is becoming a very popular activity and people are just wanting to find out where or who they came from. People have a basic desire to know where or who they come from an how they got to where they are today. You can learn about your family has been through, where they came from, and what you could possibly go through in the future. Genealogy is not just one single thread, it is a journey of many lifetimes woven together from the past, the present, and the future. This can be helpful in researching you family and discovering things you never knew about yourself or relatives. Diane Ramirez My Place of Heritage What part of Mexico are you from? Where is that? Do you remember much?… These are the questions that have followed me throughout my life since I moved to the United States. My second grade friends were very curious about my past, and I was unable to answer at the time, but as I learned the language I would tell them, “I lived in Uriangato Guanajuanto in Mexico.” After answering their question, I would have to explain to them that it was above Mexico City. They would nod, and I would think to myself, “Do they even know where Mexico City is?” I remember that even when I was young, I felt prod of where I had come from despite knowing so little about this place called Guanajuato. To this day I don’t remember much, but my mom does, and she has shared stories about the beautiful city of Guanajuato, historic events, and pictures that she took of me and my siblings when we were there. Guanajuato is known to be a revolutionary symbol o Mexico as it was the center of many important wars, and was home to many famous people. The Spaniards arrived in Guanajuato in 1522 led by Cristobal de Olid. The invasion of the Spaniards caused the deaths of countless indigenous natives, and the destruction of many communities. In 1552, Captain Juan de Jaso discovered mineral deposits such as silver which caused rapid settlement by the Spanish throughout the 16h and 17th centuries. The city of present-day Guanajuato was established in 1679. During the 17th and 18th centuries, the native population was converted to Christianity, and more than 15 convents, temples, churches and chapels were built in Guanajuato City. During this time Guanajuato was on of the 12 regions that reflected the economic and social importance of the areas agricultural and mineral production. Up until 1810, Guanajuato had been under the rule of the Spnish, but this changed thanks to the help of Miguel Hidalgo. Hildago rallied patriots to rise up against Spain which resulted in his kidnapping and death. But his death only caused anger against the people who rebelled and struggled for independence for the next decade. The local people were divided as half opposed the independence movement because the Spanish-owned mining operations haad brought economic prosperity to the city. In spite of the economic factors, Guanajuato signed the Plan of Iguala in 1821, which secured Mexico’s independence at last. This new status brought the city and the country political and social instability for the next 20 years. Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 81 After two decades of peace, Mexico City was invaded by the United States during the Mexican-American War. Guanajuato contributed to this war by sending soldiers to join other Mexican troops in an unsucessfu attempt to defend Mexico City. The war was finally over in 1848 after the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, which forced Mexico to surrender a wide strip of its northern territory to the United States. In 1858, Benito Juarez assumed the Presidency in Guanajuato, and declared it the provisional capital of Mexico. The presidency was passed down to Porfirio Diaz in 1877 to 1880, and again from 1884-1911. During this time, Guanajuato improved its economy through increased agricultural productivity and mining. However, Diaz was unfair to the people, and would assist the wealthy landowners financially. The early 20th century brought challenges to the government as citizens lost patience with Diaz’s self-serving leadership and unwillingness to recognize minority rights. A few years later, Diaz was forced out of the presidency, which caused rebel groups to battle for political control. Two major battles took place in Guanajuato – the Batalla de Celaya and the Batalla de Leon in an attempt to reshape the government, but ended briefly after the deferral troops defeated them. Political power exchanges continued over a decade until finally ending with the estabishment of the Partido Naciona Revolucionario. This new establishment ensured a period of stability for Mexico City and the rest of the country until 2000. Guanajuato today has benefited tremendously from its silver mines, which are among the richest in the world. Guanajuato also has tin, gold, copper, lead, mercury and opal mines, and it’s the leading state in the nation in the manufacturing of shoes. Guanajuato also exports fatm products, motor vehicles, leather goods, chemicals and electric machinery. http:/www.history.com/topics/mexico/guanajuato Corey Baldwin The Importance of Genealogical Research Genealogy is the study and tracing of lines of descent or development continuously from an ancestor. Or as applied to most, the study of where we came from, and where our parents and their parents came from, etc. Here in America, we have something very special. We have a country that through out time many people have migrated to for freedom, unlike any other that could be found any where else in the world. For this reason, America has become a “melting pot,” or a society made up of people with many different racial and ethic backgrounds. For instance, my boss is supposedly Polish, Irish and Jewish, or so she has been told. Tracing my own ethnicity, I am supposedly Norman (which is French and Viking heritage put together) and French just on my father’s side. My mother’s would make me Anglo-Saxon and Welsh. This much I can only gather from last names, but that can only get one so far, and how accurate is it really? How does one know if their last name was changed or if an ancestor way back when was really adopted with or without any records? Would it not be great if science could just give us an answer of what we really are? Tell us how Irish we really are, instead of us just pretending on Saint Patrick’s Day. Well science is there and its called genealogy. People say that one can not truly know where they are going until they know where they have been. This could not be more true and it can apply to genealogical research. We as people need to know where we came from in order to move forward in life. It can bring closure to what our ancestors really went through and most importantly us knowing what we can take due to the blood that runs through our veins. We can even learn what parts of the world that some of our ancestors came from before they even migrated to places that are known. For example, most northern Europeans migrated to modern day countries from areas around the Black Sea. Would it not be amazing to track your heritage to years before Christ walked the earth. Many others think so. Although knowing where you came from is very interesting and exciting, there is another side to the coin which is probably more important to most. When one looks back into family records one can easily start to see that there is typically a pattern in the health aspects of the records. One can learn the average life span of a family and get an idea of why. Whether it be from old age or diseases common in a family. After being aware of this, there can be changes in ones lifestyle in attempt to combat these ailments. The list goes on and on about what health information one can assume through their family tree. Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 82 For which ever reason one researches genealogy, we can see that it can be most helpful in many different ways and aspects through out life. For this reason it is a field that needs to be continually studied and expounded on. Without it we are in a sense blind and not knowing where we are going. Corey Baldwin’s Personal Statement: My name is Corey Baldwin. As long as I can remember, which was about the time of my parents divorce, we were poor. Growing up without a father has been financially and emotionally difficult. Society has labeled me as a person with no hope. The reason I would like this scholarship is to help me get through school. By getting through school it would help me break the physical and emotional chains of a semi poverty life. Growing up, the thing that helped my family and I the most is going to church. By learning Christian ethics and family values, I gained the knowledge of hard work and giving back to those in need (just how I have been in need before). I usually work full time hours and go to school. If I become successful with my culinary skills and end up living a “well off” life financially, the God as my witness, I will help others going to school and making their dreams come true. Just like I hope you will do for me. That is my personal goal. As far as education goes I always did fairly well in school. I slacked mainly as a freshman in high school and in college (I am enrolled in the Early College Program). That was a rude awakening, and since my freshman year I have done my best to pick up the pace. Sure some classes I have struggled with, but for the most part I make A’s and B’s. I had half of my Associates Degree (give or take) by the time I finished my senior year. The I found my true passion in the Arts. The way I express myself through Art is not with a paint brush or canvas, but rather with a sharp knife as my brush and some fresh food “painted” perfectly on my white “canvas” plate. That’s right, I’m enrolled in Culinary School. Although I have a lot of college credits as it is, not to many count towards my degree I have a head start in all my classes being paid for, which is why I deeply appreciate the Early College Program. However, next year’s courses are not covered, and that is why a scholarship would be necessary and much appreciated or me to reach my goals. From a professional stand point, I don’t plan on ever opening my own establishment (however, on God holds the future) For my degree I have to have an internship this summer at a restaurant, and I am choosing to work at a Country Club. There are a few that I’m looking at, and they are looking at me also. As far as work in the culinary business goes these are the type of establishments I’m looking at, at least at first. These are my goals in the Culinary Industry As far as who gets this scholarship or not, I am sure the right decision will be made. Even if it is not me, I would like to thank each and every person who has taken the time out of their busy lives to read my application. No matter the outcome I will continue to work towards my degree, my goals, my dreams, and most importantly the pursuit of happiness. Thank you, Corey Lee Baldwin Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 83 Joseph M. Sutton Family ED: Fern Parris Hensley, JCGS member donated the following information to the Society. This is part of the extensive research she has done on her family lines. Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 84 Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 85 Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 86 OBITUARY JOSEPH SUTTON and MRS. PRICE DILLARD Joseph Sutton was born July 27th 1840 and died Apr. 15th 1920. Mr. Sutton was married to Miss Violet Crawford Feb. 22nd 1866. There were born to this union eleven children. The subject of this memoir belonged to the old and extensive family of Sutton in Jackson and surrounding counties. His wife was a member of the sturdy Scotch family of Crawford, many of whom were people of more than ordinary native intelligence and personal attractiveness. Mr. Sutton was a brave confederate soldier having enlisted in the well known Co. A. 10th N. C. Regiment which was organized as the very first troops were to leave Jackson County for the seat of war, under the captaincy of Andrew W. Coleman; of David Coleman's Battalion; William D. Pende's Brigade, A.P. Hills Division and which served in all the engagements of the illustrious army of northern Virginia under Joseph E. Johnston and Robt. E. Lee, and whose beloved captain was slain at the battle of Frasiers's Farm. Joseph Sutton was a youthful soldier just out of his teens but no more gallant a boy wore the gray. He was the life of his comrades, having a natural wit and ever ready with the newest yarn and an inimitable way of spinning it. He was a fine natural observer of human nature and his practical jokes were stingless to the health and good cheer of all. An ever impressive trait in his character was simplicity and honesty and the influence of his unobtrusive intercourse could not but affect the most casual acquaintance. - - - - - - In fine he was a model of the best in the great mass of mountainneer citizenship and deserves to be perpetuated in the unwritten annols -- the heart record of the plain people of these hills, whom he so dearly loved and for whose homes and hearthsides he offered the hopes and bloodties of youth to defend. Joseph Sutton was a brave soldier in time of need, but he loved peace and the calm, sequestered ways thereof. He was a loving husband, a good neighbor, a loyal friend an ideally ordered citizen and a devout christian without pretention and without offence. When he gave up the last fight with the last enemy he went straight to that place prepared for just men and where the good soldiers may have surcease from war and the petty strifes of puny men, forever. I am very happy to have the honour to lay my oak leaf of tribute upon the bier of this real man -- the friend and comrade of my sainted father. It was a very inscrutable, but beautiful coincidence that his daughter, Mrs. Daisy Dillard, wife of Mr. Price Dillard, who was on her deathbed in his home died a very few hours after his own passage, and that he prayed that she might go with him. It is said by all who knew her that Mrs. Dillard was a woman of the most amiable character, loved by all who knew her, and a leader in every good word and work in her community. Jas. H. Cathey. Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 87 Descendants of John Thomas Tatham ED: This family record was submitted by JCGS member, Mary Buchanan Smith. It will continue in following issues. 31. Ann Hasseltine Tatham She was born 6 Sep 1846 in Cherokee Co., NC and died 27 Dec 1875 in Cherokee Co., NC. She married Newt Ross McClellan 21 Aug 1866. He was born 1845 and died 1895. Ann Hasseltine Tatham and Newt Ross McClellan had the following children: i. Robert McClellan ii. Clara McClellan 90. iii. Gussie McClellan iii. Belzora McClellan Generation 5 32. Dicy Ann Fulcher She was born 1855 in Macon County, NC. She married John M. P. Stiles 13 Jan 1867 in Macon Co., NC. He was the son of Laban Stiles and Maria, he was born 1847 in Macon Co., NC. Dicey Ann Fulcher and John M. P. Stiles had the following child: i. Amanda R. Stiles She was born Sep 1870 33. Eugene Jackson Tatham He was born 14 Jul 1869 in Lawrence Co., Alabama and died 14 Feb 1933 in Selma, Dallas Co., Alabama. He married Dora Jane (Jennie) Davidson. She was born 21 Jan 1876 in Alabama and died 16 Feb 1931 in Alabama. Notes for Eugene Jackson Tatham: 1900 Mtn. Home, Lawrence AL 1910 Halyville, Winston, AL E. J. Tatham 30 Jul 1869 Eugene H. Tatham 40 Flagman on RR Jennie 22 Jan 1878 Jennie 30 Mable 9/12 Aug 1899 Mable 10 Rebecca 5 John R. 10/12 1920 Selma, Dallas Co., AL 1930 Selma, Dallas Co., AL Eugene Tatham 48 Flagman, works Steam Railway Eugene Tatham 55 Jennie 42 Jennie 50 Rebecca 14 John 20 John 10 City Directories: 1913 216 Green, Selma 1916 15 Law, Selma 1920 1700 Alabama, Selma 1926 1600 Alabama Ave., Selma 1929 209 Green, Selma Death records of Eugene Jackson Tatham gives following information: 2001 Broad Street, Selma, Alabama; occupation Rail Road Flagman; Widowed; mother born in Cedartown, Georgia. Eugene Jackson Tatham and Dora Jane (Jennie) Davidson had the following children: i. Mable Tatham She was born Aug 1899 ii. Rebecca Tatham She was born 1905 in Alabama. iii. John R. Tatham He was born 1909 in Alabama. Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 88 34. Carl Monroe Tatham He was born 20 Jul 1886 and died 6 Feb 1960. He married Mary Francis White. Carl Monroe Tatham and Mary Francis White had the following children: i. Helen Francis Tatham She was born 27 Jun 1912 ii. James Carlton Tatham He was born 23 Oct 1915 iii. Patricia Ann Tatham She was born 17 Mar 1920 iv. Peggy Tatham She was born 27 Sep 1928 34. Adda F. Hicks She was born 11 Nov 1864 in Macon Co., NC and died 10 Mar 1939 in Macon Co., NC. She married 44. Jonathan W. Phillips, 11 Nov 1885 in Macon Co., NC. He was the son of Robert A. Phillips and Clarinda Tatham He was born 14 Oct 1856 in Macon Co., NC and died 25 Jan 1934 in Macon Co., NC. Notes for Adda F. Hicks and Jonathan W. Phillips: 1900 Census, Macon Co., NC 1910 Census, Macon Co., NC Jonathan Phillips 43 Oct 1856 Farmer add children Addie F. 34 Nov 1865 Clarence E. 9 b. 1901 Cora E. 13 Sep 1866 Wendell H. 7 Charles R. 12 10 Jul 1888 Katie C. 3 Dora H. 11 1890 Annie L. 8 Dec 1891 1920 Census, Macon Co., NC Frank 6 Jul 1893 Jonathan 63 Louie B. 3 Oct 1896 Addie 55 Tommie W. 1 Jun 1888 6 children living at home Linnie E. Tatham 64 May 1836 Boarder Aunt to Addie Clurinda Phillips 70 Feb 1830 Mother 1930 Census, Macon Co., NC Jonathan 78 Addie F. 65 Kate C. 23 Adda F. Hicks and Jonathan W. Phillips had the following children: 91. i. Cora Ellen Phillips She was born 10 Sep 1886 in Macon Co., NC and died 12 May 1968 in Habersham Co., Georgia. She married Odell Snyder 21 Nov 1909 in Macon Co., NC. ii. Charles Robert Phillips He was born 1 Jan 1888 in Macon Co., NC and died 10 Feb 1951 in Macon Co., NC. He is buried Mt. Zion Methodist Church Cemetery, Franklin, Macon Co., NC. He married Mattie V. Waldroup. Notes for Charles Robert Phillips: 1930 Census Macon Co., NC 1940 Census Macon Co., NC Charles R. Phillips 42 C. R. Phillips 52 Mattie V. 35 Mattie 45 J. A. M. Waldroup 75 mother in law Myrtle 54 Charles completed 7th grade, worked 20 weeks Income $300 WWI Draft Card: Medium height; Stout build; blue eyes; lt. brown hair; Farmer 92. iii. Dora Hicks Phillips She was born 9 Apr 1890 in Macon Co., NC and died 15 Jul 1977 in Pompano Beach, Broward County, Florida. She married William H. McNab 17 Dec 1912 in Macon co., NC. 93. iv. Frank Jake Phillips He was born 17 Jul 1893 in Macon Co, NC and died 29 Jan 1969 in Macon Co., NC. He is buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, Macon Co., NC. He married Augusta Garner 14 Apr 1915 in Macon Co., NC. 94. v. Louis Bryan Phillips He was born 29 Oct 1896 in Macon Co. NC and died 14 Aug 1955 in Macon Co., NC. He married Burdelle Setzer 14 Apr 1915 in Macon Co., NC. Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 89 95. vi. Thomas Weaver Phillips He was born 15 Jun 1898 in Macon Co., NC and died May 1967 in Pompano Beach, Broward Co., Florida. He married Avis Trimmer 3 Apr 1926 in Macon Co., NC. 96. vii. Clarence Phillips He was born 8 Dec 1900 and died 17 Jan 1965 in Greensboro, Guilford Co., NC. viii. Wendell H. Phillips He was born 1903 in Macon Co., NC. Notes for Wendell H. Phillips: 1930 Census Macon Co., NC ix. Kate C. Phillips She was born 13 Jun 1906 36. John F. Pruitt He was born 1862 Fannin Co., Georgia and died 23 Feb 1922 in Georgia. He married Nancy B. She was born 1862. Notes for John F. Pruitt: 1900 Owltown, Union Co., Georgia 1910 Morganton, Fannin Co., Georgia John F. Pruitt 38 Farmer John F. Pruitt 48 Farmer Nancy B. 38 Nancy 45 Martha C. 16 Della 19 Deller M. 9 William H. 17 William H. 7 Margaret 14 Margarett E. 3 Terrell 7 Alma 4 John Pruitt, died 23 Feb 1922, Georgia Death Index John F. Pruitt and Nancy B. had the following children: i. Martha Pruitt She was born 1886 in Georgia ii. Della M. Pruitt She was born 1891 in Georgia iii. William H. Pruitt He was born 1893 iv. Margaret E. Pruitt She was born 1897 v. Terrell Pruitt He was born 1903 in Georgia Notes for Terrell Pruitt: 1910 Marietta, Cobb Co., Georgia 1920 Marietta, Cobb Co., Georgia Terrell Pruitt Boarder, Farm Laborer Terrell Pruitt 26 Truck Driver at Coca Cola Grace 21 vi. Alma Pruitt She was born 1906 in Georgia 37. Harry Herbert Armstrong He was born 10 Jun 1880 in Weaverville, Trinity Co., California and died 20 Sep 1948 in Ogden, Weber Co., Utah. He married Elizabeth Naomi Jones 19 Feb 1908. She was born 27 Jul 1884 and died 27 Oct 1929. Notes for Harry Herbert Armstrong: 1910 Census, Ogden, Utah 1920 Census, Ogden Ward 3, Weber Co., Utah Harry H. 26 Harry 37 b. CA owns home Elizabeth 25 Elizabeth J. 35 b. Utah Harold C. 1 Harold C. 10 b. Utah Naomi 6 Edward R. 1 9/12 1930 Census, Ogden Utah 1940 Census, North Ogden, Weber Co., Utah Harry 47 Supplyman depot station Harry 58 Ellen 43 Ellen G. 53 Harold 21 Edward R. 22 taxi driver Naomi 18 Helen 16 Edward 12 Helen 6 Norma Paquin 16 stepdaughter Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 90 Harry Herbert Armstrong and Elizabeth Naomi Jones had the following children: i. Charles Harold Armstrong He was born 1909 ii. Edward R. Armstrong He was born 1918 in Ogden, Weber Co., Utah. iii. Harold C. Armstrong, He was born 1910 in Ogden, Webr Co., Utah. He married Lillian Gilkey 25 May 1944 in Washington State. 38. Nathan Wilburn Bumgarner He was born 23 Mar 1848 in Macon Co., NC and died 18 Aug 1939 in Jackson Co., NC. He is buried in Fairview Memorial Gardens, Jackson Co., NC. He married Margaret T. Parris 25 Oct 1871 in Jackson Co. NC. She was born 30 Aug 1846 and died 21 Apr 1904 in Jackson Co., NC. She is buried in Fairview Memorial Gardens, Jackson Co., NC. Notes for Nathan Wilburn Bumgarner: 1900 Census, Webster, Jackson Co., NC 1910 Census, Webster, Jackson Co., NC William 52 b. Mar 1848 Wilburn N. 62 Widower Margaret 54 b. Aug 1846 lives with son George E. and family George E. 24 b. Mar 1876 Etta M. 15 b. Apr 1875 Nathan Wilburn Bumgarner and Margaret T. Parris had the following children: i. Rufus C. Bumgarner He was born 1872 in Jackson Co., NC ii. Etta M. Bumgarner She was born Apr 1875 97. iii. George Estes Bumgarner He was born 3 Mar 1876 in Jackson Co., NC and died 6 Jan 1960 in Jackson Co., NC. He is buried in Lovedale Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. He married Margaret S. about 1900. 39. William Bumgarner He was born 1850 in Jackson Co., NC and died 22 May 1918 in Whatcom Co., Washington. He married Sarah J. Allen 15 Sep 1871 in Jackson Co., NC. She was born 1848 in Jackson Co., NC. Notes for William Bumgarner: 1880 Census, Barkers Creek, Jackson Co., NC 1900 Census, Barkers Creek, Jackson Co., NC William 30 William 50 Sarah 32 b. 1846 Sarah 51 Leona H. 7 b. 1872 Joseph T. 16 Ella E. 6 b. 1873 Lola E. 11 A. W. 5 b. 1875 (Ambrose William) Glen R. Harris 6 Maraih 3 b. 1877 Martha 3 b. 1877 1912 Bellingham, Washington Directory William Bumgarner and Sarah J. Allen had the following children: i. L. L. Bumgarner She was born 1872 ii. Ellen E. Bumgarner She was born 9 Nov 1873 in Jackson Co., NC and died 18 Sep 1960 in Jackson Co., NC. She is buried in Keener Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. iii. Ambrose William Bumgarner He was born 12 Apr 1875 in Jackson Co., NC and died 12 Jun 1928 in Bellingham, Washington. Notes for Ambrose William Bumgarner: 1920 Census, Bellingham, Whatcom Co., WA Ambrose Bumgaarner 44 b. NC works in logging camp Rena Rogers 14 b. NC iv. Marah Bumgarner She was born 1877. v. Martha Bumgarner She was born 1877. vi. Cordelia Bumgarner She was born 1879 vii. Joseph T. Bumgarner He was born Mar 1884 in Jackson Co., NC and died 2 Aug 1947. viii. Lila E. Bumgarner She was born 20 Sep 1888 in Jackson Co., NC and died 29 Jan 1919 in WA. Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 91 World War I Draft Cards For Jackson County, North Carolina ED: These are abstracts from World War I draft cards for men living in Jackson County in the years 1917-1918. To read: Name; Birth date; Race; Birthplace; Which Draft Card was used. The listing of registration place for the majority of the men just list “Jackson, NC.” Abstracted by Sanji T Watson 2015. Galloway, Elbert Dallas 28 Nov 1881 W ng C Galloway, Virgil Lusk ? Jun 1893 W unreadable A George, Elijah 1 Apr 187? I ng C George, Goolacke 14 Sep 1895 I Cherokee A George, Shon W. 18 Sep 1874 I ng C Gibbs, Charlie Hampton 23 Jun 189? W Whittier B Gibbs, John Wesley 16 Nov 1889 W Seneca, SC A Gibbs, Richard Harrison 30 Mar 1888 W Cullowhee A Gibbs, William Asberry 10 Jul 1892 W Walhalla, SC A Gibson, Cole Elexander 18 Oct 1877 W ng C Gibson, Pink 31 Oct 1881 W ng C Gibson, Theodore Fred 9 Aug 1898 W ng C Gidney, Landrum Hillrand 21 Jun 1874 W Clyde A Going, Daniel 10 Sep 1899 I ng C Golden, Delos Dexter 28 Apr 1886 W ng C Golden, John Realis 10 Jun 1889 W ng C Golden, Joseph Daniel 15 Oct 1881 W ng C Gray, George Odel 17 Apr 189? W Dillsboro A Gray, Lewis S. 8 Dec 1900 W ng C Green, ????? Clarence ?? Jun 189? W ??? NC A Green, Allen 15 Sep 1888 W Whittier A Green, Benjamin Dewy 23 Oct 1899 W ng C Green, Cris Columbus 24 Dec 1878 W ng C Green, David Oliver 15Jan 1873 W ng C Green, Estes 15 Sep 1878 W ng C Green, Felix Ethel 1 Jun 1891 W Greens Creek A Green, George Claude 7 Sep 1887 W Clyde A Green, George Harley 16 Dec 1884 W ng C Green, Golman Leander 14 May 1891 W Greens Creek A Green, Grover Cleveland 14 Jan 1893 W Greens Creek A Green, Howell 28 Feb 1876 W ng C Green, James Elijah 29 Jul 1874 W ng C Green, Jerry 19 Sep 189? W NC A Green, Joe 10 Mar 1896 W Barkers Creek A Green, John H???? 15 Aug 189? W B Green, John R. 31 Mar 1884 W ng C Green, John William 5 Mar 1874 W ng C Green, Joseph Franklin 22 Jan 18?? W Jackson Co. A Green, Lenoire 15 Jun 189 W unreadable B Green, Loyd McKinley 30 Jun 1890 W Clyde A Green, Robert Wesley 23 Sep 1875 W ng C Green, Theodore Adolphus 19 Aug 1877 W ng C Green, Thomas Henry 6 Mar 1877 W ng C Green, William Benjamin ? ??? 189? W Jackson Co. A Green, William Harrison 30 Sep 189? W Waynesville A Green, William Theodore 15 Aug 1900 W ng C Gribble, David E. 4 ??? ???? W unreadable A Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 92 Gribble, James Thomas 19 Sep 1879 W ng C Gribble, Wib 30 Jan 1897 W Gay A Guffey, Charles Eugene 26 Dec 1895 W Ilean, NC A Guffey, Dewey Lee 3 Mar 1900 I ng C Gunter, Claud 6 Jan 1896 W Barkers Creek A Gunter, David Hanley 30 Jul 1885 W ng C Gunter, John ????? 5 Mar 1894 W unreadable A Gunter, Julous 1 May 1891 W Dillsboro A Gunter, Marion Alonzo 15 Nov 1898 W ng C Gunter, Samuel Lee 8 Jan 1898 W ng C Gunter, Thomas Kimbel 1 Jan 1873 W ng C Gurat, Charles 24 Jun 1894 W Franklin, NC A Guy, Vess 2 Jul 1891 W Cecil, NC A Hall, Baxter 22 Aug 1878 W ng C Hall, Clingman 27 Aug 1886 W Jackson Co. A Hall, David Coleman 1 Jun 1875 W ng C Hall, David McKee 10 Apr 1887 W Webster A Hall, Dillard 5 May 1882 W ng C Hall, Emless R. 25 Jun 1892 W Greens Creek A Hall, Felix Theodore 1 Feb 1892 W Greens Creek A Hall, James E. 24 May 18?? W Willets A Hall, Jimerson 22 May 1890 W Greens Creek A Hall, John Henry 18 Oct 1896 W Greens Creek A Hall, John Hershel 17 Dec 1889 W Leatherman, NC A Hall, Johnie 24 Jan 1896 W Greens Creek A Hall, Norman Edward 25 Jan 1900 W ng C Hall, Richard Franklin 11 Dec 1899 W ng C Hall, Robert Frazer 9 Jul 1874 W ng C Hall, Samuel Pierce 17 Nov 1881 W ng C Hall, Tolvin Coward 15 Jul 1880 W ng C Hall, Warmon 14 Oct 1891 W Greens Creek A Hall, William Henry 8 Dec 187? W ng C Hall, William Sharn 22 May 1886 W ng C Hampton, Grimefield Taylor 14 Jun 1888 W Whittier A Harris, Andrew Johnson 22 Jul 1882 W ng C Harris, Ben not given W Haywood Co. A Harris, Benjamin Everette 20 Apr 1900 W ng C Harris, David Rust 21 Oct 1882 W ng C Harris, Dock 31 May 1885 W ng C Harris, Garfield 19 Oct 188? W ng C Harris, James Wiley 23 Dec 1873 W ng C Harris, James 11 Nov 1884 W Webster A Harris, James 3 Mar 1897 W Wolf Mountain B Harris, John William McKinley 25 Nov 1897 W ng C Harris, Lender Robert 18 Apr 1881 W ng C Harris, Link not given W NC A Harris, Marion Mills 22 Sep 1892 W ng C\ Harris, Odus 19 May 1895 W Sylva A Harris, Robert Ward 27 Sep 1887 W Denver, Colorado A Harris, Shuford 6 Oct 1880 W ng C Harris, William Thomas 3 Mar 1881 W ng C Harrison, Oliver Jeter 9 Feb 1900 W ng C Harrison, William Calvin 28 Aug 1874 W ng C Haskett, John Parker 14 Nov 1892 W Ellijay, NC A Hastings, John Jarrett 3 Oct 1886 W ng C Hatcher, Amos 16 Jul 1848 W ng C Journeys Through Jackson Spring 2015 93 Hatcher, Robert Lee 29 Sep 1873 W ng C Hawkins, Charlie H. 6 Dec 1899 W ng C Hawkins, Granville M. 12 Dec 1892 W Cashiers A Hawkins, Walter W. 19 Jun 1881 W Cashiers A Hawkins, William Wade 19 Jun 1885 W ng C Hayes, Ira Alexander 12 May 1875 W ng C Hayes, Julius Caesar 22 Jul 1883 W ng C Head, John Leopard 30 Mar 1885 W ng C Heating, Harry Ritchford 23 Oct 1886 W Sylva A Henderson, Burney 1 Jan 1884 W ng C Henderson, Deck 10 Aug 1880 W ng C Henderson, James Harrison 29 Nov 1870 W NC A Henderson, R. Corley 8 Nov 1888 W Glenville A Henry, Ansel McKinley 24 May 1893 W Addie A Henry, Cary Wesley 22 Oct 1891 W Willets A Henry, Elsie McKinley 6 Mar 1894 W Willets A Henry, Joseph Dallas 29 Jul 1875 W ng C Henry, Loren 1 May 1899 W Addie A Henry, Marcellus Jefferson 18 Sep 1883 W ng C Henry, Solomon Askew 2 Feb 1886 W ng C Henry, Solomon Askew 7 Feb 1886 W ng C Henry, William Harrison 1 May 1888 W Willets A Hensley George Washington 20 Jul 1878 W ng C Hensley, Baxter ? ??? 189? W Dillsboro B Hensley, Cary 22 Jul 1896 W Dillsboro B Hensley, Chas. Wesley 15 Nov 1881 W ng C Hensley, Isaac 10 Oct 1896 W Dillsboro A Hensley, Joe 15 Sep 1883 W ng C Hensley, John 24 Jun 1889 W Whittier A Hensley, John 4 Jun 1881 W ng C Hensley, Samuel Julius 16 Jun 18?? W Bryson City A Hensley, Willie 28 Mar 1889 W Dillsboro A Henson, Alonzo Medford 18 Aug 1892 W ng C Henson, Burke Madison 31 Dec 1897 W ng C Henson, Frank 29 Jun 18?? W Jackson Co. A Henson, Lawrence 22 Aug 1891 W Cullowhee A Henson, Lewis Jasper 3 Aug 1891 W Cullowhee A Henson, Phillip Candler 7 Mar 1875 W ng C Henson, Rufus

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Journeys Through Jackson 2015 Vol.25 No.04
Jackson County Genealogical Society (N.C.)
Academic Journal Academic Journal | 01/01/2015 Please log in to see more details
Journeys Through Jackson is the official journal of the Jackson County Genealogical So... more
Journeys Through Jackson 2015 Vol.25 No.04
01/01/2015
Journeys Through Jackson is the official journal of the Jackson County Genealogical Society, Inc. The journal began as a monthly publication in July 1991, was published bimonthly from 1994 to 2003, and continues today as a quarterly publication. The journal issues in this digital collection are presented as annual compilations. ; Journeys Through Jackson The Official Journal of the Jackson County Genealogical Society, Inc. Vol. XXV, No. IV Fall 2015 JACKSON COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY, INC. 2015 Officers President . Timothy Osment Vice Presidents . Lynn Hotaling, Jason Gregory Secretary . Mary Buchanan Smith Treasurer . Teresa Deitz Manring Librarian. Marie Clark Office Manager . Karen Nicholson Web Master . Deanne G. Roles Computer Technician . Jason N. Gregory Chair, Publications (Editor) . Sanji Talley Watson Journeys Through Jackson is the official publication of the Jackson County Genealogical Society. Members and non-members are invited to submit genealogical materials for publication, with the understanding that the editor reserves the right to edit these materials for genealogical content, clarity, or taste. The Society assumes no responsibility for errors of fact that may be contained in submissions, and except where noted, the opinions expressed are not those of the editor or of the Jackson County Genealogical Society. The Society accepts no advertising for this publication except for notices from other non-profit groups. From the Editor As the holiday season is beginning, I have been traveling down memory lane quite often. I was thinking the other day about a Christmas that we had in the mid 70’s. My grandmother had passed away and Granddad wanted us to come to his house for the holidays. Just imagine trying to get five kids to go to bed so that “Santy Claus” would come. They put us all five in one bed in the back bedroom, and being kids we were cutting up and giggling. He would come to the door and tell us that if we didn’t get to sleep that he would tell Santy Claus to leave. He kept trying to get us to calm down and go to sleep, but to no avail, we cut up until nearly 11 pm that night. He even went outside with sleigh bells, to the back window, to convince us that he ran Santy Claus off. For the life of me, I can’t remember what we got for Christmas that year, but I do know that we received something that we would carry with us the rest of our lives. We had family that loved us; we had quality time with our granddad goofing off with us, and memories that would last a lifetime. We may not have been rich in monetary means, but in things that matter we was as rich as Midas. Family, love, and memories made us rich. As the end of the year is approaching, we would like to wish all our members, near and far, a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. May all your elusive ancestors be found in the upcoming year. Good health, good friends, and lots of genealogy in the upcoming year are our wishes for you. REMEMBER DUES FOR 2016 ARE DUE AT THE FIRST OF THE YEAR! Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2015 145 Table of Contents Table of Contents, Note from JCGS President .145 JCGS Photo Album. 146-150 2015 Officer Reports . 151-153 Where Our Members Live .154 Welcome New Members . 154-156 “And the Winners Are” . 157-158 Descendants of John Thomas Tatham . 159-162 1880 Census Records – Jackson County . 163-166 Descendants of Archer Blanton . 167-170 1938 Jackson County Death Certificates . 171-174 This and That .174 World War I Draft Cards . 175-178 Doctors Daily Journal . 179-182 Descendants of John Montgomery Beck . 183-186 Cope Family of South Dakota . 187-190 Index . 191-192 Note from JCGS President Sometimes things get ahead of themselves. Recently we realized that our successful monthly programs have moved into the front seat and our monthly meetings have moved into the back. Our topics are certainly interesting and the programs are well attended. However, we, our members and the community want to know a little more about our day-to-day operations. With that in mind, beginning in January, our meetings on the second Thursday of each month will begin at 6:30 p.m. with light refreshments, fellowship, and an update on the Society’s activities and finances. The programs will continue to begin at 7 p.m. And, a request, we hope many of you will volunteer to provide refreshments once during the calendar year. Let us know! 828 631-2646. The Jackson County Genealogical Society is looking forward to a great 2016. Tim Osment JCGS President Starting January 1, 2016, the address for JCGS will be changing. It will be: Jackson County Genealogical Society Post Office Box 480 Sylva, NC 28779 Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2015 146 JCGS Photo Album Above is JCGS member Vee Jones with the rifle and targets that he shot at a shooting match in Cataloochee on 9 Aug 1963. It was called the best ever “X” shot ever made there. Three .45 caliber bullets in the same hole. We offer our condolences and sympathy to his family, as Vee passed away recently. He also had the distinction of being the oldest member of JCGS. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2015 147 JCGS Photo Album Vee Jones recently brought this picture into the JCGS office to see if any of the members could identify the people in the picture below. If anyone knows their identity, feel free to contact the Society with the names. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2015 148 JCGS Photo Album Elizabeth Wilson, JCGS member recently brought this picture to the society office. She says that the picture is either the 1953 or 1955 graduating class of Glenville High School. Front Row, left to right: Odell Bumgarner, Leland Evitt. Back Row, left to right: Bernice Broom, Alieen Houston, Bobbie Pennington, Doris Fowler, Sovella McCall, Thad Mills (son of Dalas Mills), Janet Holden (daughter of Alva Holden), Dorthy May Bryson. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2015 149 JCGS Photo Album The picture above is also from Elizabeth Wilson. Only two people are identified; John Jennings sitting down with Ella Bryson on the left. If anyone knows the other people, feel free to let us know. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2015 150 JCGS Photo Album Our October fund raiser was termed to be a success. Plans are already in the making or the next one. Food, fun, fellowship, (and some friendly bidding against one another) was had. Live music was provided by the Deitz Family and Children of Zion, with George Frizzell telling a tale of Jackson County history. Along with a silent auction, raffle tickets were sold for the items shown above with their respective winners: a Scott Hotaling original picture was won by Linda Ledford (on the left); and another one was won by JCGS member, Norma Bryson Clayton (on right). The felted hat, handmade by JCGS member, Mary Buchanan Smith, was won by Karen Monteith, JCGS Office Manager and member. Thank you to all who donated and participated in the event. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2015 151 2015 Officer Reports Following is the Officer reports for 2015. The Treasurer’s Report for the entire year will be included in the Winter 2016 issue, after the end of the year. President Tim Osment Publicly recognizing contributions is often fraught with peril. The fear of omitting someone creates an apprehension that lurks before, during, and after any mentions. However, there comes an undeniable moment when gratitude overcomes all other sentiments and nothing is as appropriate as expressing a heartfelt ad humble thank you. Looking back on a successful ear filled with bustle and joy, this is one of those moments. Thank you to our members. You are the heart and soul of our society and are the primary reason we do not as individuals, but as a collection of individuals, as a group. Thank you to our board and office volunteers. Your dedication and endless hours keeps the “train on the track.” Or to use a more appropriate genealogical metaphor, you care for every limb, ever branch, every bough of our extended family tree. Thank you to our financial supporters. From those who stop by and drop a dollar in the jar, to those who faithfully renew their annual memberships, to those who step up and contribute when the fiscal slopes get slippery, to those who underwrite our research, publications, and activities, both in private and in full view, we would not exist without you. Thank you to those who enjoyed and presented our monthly programs. The music was lively, the topics were interesting, and the pleasant surprises were many. Each second Thursday resembled a mini-family reunion. And, something to look forward to, in 2016 we plan to add food to our fellowship and open each program with a reception and light refreshments. Finally, thank you to God for creating families, both extended and close-by. Connecting those who came before us with those who are still on the way is a true mission of The Jackson County Genealogical Society. We are comforted and our lives are made richer with the stories, wih the memories, and with the knowledge we preserve, share and pass on. So, once again, for both your financial and personal support, thank you. Co Vice President & I.T. Jason Gregory It has been a very rewarding past year for me personally, while serving on the Board of Directors for Jackson County Genealogical Society. We continue to have wonderful programs each month, that have been well attended and several which have had power-point presentations and or photographs. I have enjoyed both meeting and assisting our guests on these nights. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2015 152 One facet of my responsibilities is to continually scan and likewise digitize records pertaining to the history of Jackson County and its people. This years project, the complete digitization of the Mead Corporations employee magazine, The Sylvan. This collection spans the years 1950-1974. This collection was made possible by the efforts of the late Hattie Hilda Allison. This work is available on CD in the JCGS office. My 2016 goal is the digitization of the Ledgers of William Holland Thomas’ Scotts Creek store for the years 1832-1860. These Ledgers are probably the oldest group of records in the existence concerning pre-Jackson County families in its present location. Office Manager Karen Nicholson The Society office has been open throughout 2015 staffed by our dedicated volunteers. Grateful appreciation is extended to Bill Crawford, Jason Gregory, James Monteith, Larry Morton, Marilyn Morton, Kenneth Nicholson, Deanne Roles, Ruth Shuler, Sam Shuler, Mary Wachacha, and Sanji Watson for the many hours they have spent as volunteers. The office schedule remains 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. on Saturdays. At this time visitor patterns do not require additional hours. Visitors from many counties of North Carolina and other states have toured the office this year and have been assisted in their genealogical research. In addition to the regular office operation, a major effort during the year was a very successful fundraiser held in October. Again appreciation is due to many members for their willingness to help in all possible ways. Web Master Deanne Gibson Roles Our website has been busy in 2015. The data from December 2014 thru November 2015, shows that we have had 28,440 visits to our website, www.jacksoncountyncgenealogicalsociety.org, during that time period. Most of the visits have come directly to our home page, with those who are coming in via a search engine, with Google being used more than any other search engine. We have averaged 2400 visits per month or 547 visits per week. The most visited page is our home page with our civil war pages, photo album, and bookstore pages following close behind. We welcome any material that members would like to send for publication on the website. We have re-named the Facebook discussion group “Jackson County NC Families” and the membership on that page has increased to almost 200. It is a page on which people with Jackson County connections can talk with others and exchange information. This, of course, is a vital part of any genealogical society. We now have an official Jackson County NC Genealogical Society Facebook page where all of our events and items of general interest concerning the society are posted. Teresa Deitz Manring is facilitating that page. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2015 153 Librarian Marie Clark Our library is continuing to grow with donations of books, magazines, collections from newspapers that have been collected for years, and even a collection of yearbooks from Western Carolina University. With the new donations coming in, there is always something to check out. Editor Sanji T. Watson Journeys Through Jackson is still going strong with members and people of the communities of Jackson County who have been extremely generous to donate materials for our publication. Thank you to all who have donated stories, pictures, family histories, or ideas to us for inclusion into the JTJ. We have republished several of our books this year, which means that people are continuing to purchase them. Plans are in the works to republish several more books in the coming year to keep up with the demand. We currently have 266 members across the United States, 2 in foreign countries, and currently have 35 exchanges with other societies and libraries across the US. Give someone this Christmas the gift that will keep giving all year long! Consider giving someone a membership to the Society. They will receive all the benefits that you enjoy. Gift cards are available to announce your gift to them. For more information, contact the JCGS office. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2015 154 Where Our Members Live Below is a map of the United States, and each member is accounted for in their own state. We are located around the nation and in two foreign countries. Each year, we continue to grow and find new relatives all over. Welcome to Our New Members ED: The following is a list of the new members to the Society for 2014 and 2015. Please read the list and check out the families of interest. If you see a family name of interest to you, correspond with that new member. You never know where you might find that missing link. NAME ADDRESS CONTACT INFO FAMILIES OF INTEREST Andrews, Nancy Lovingood 10100 Hillview Drive, Apt. #1112 Pensacola, FL 32514 James, Ammons Ball, Richard L. 31 Massengale Road Ringgold, GA 30736 rball0351@gmail.com Queen Broom, Elizabeth 71 Sugar Creek Road Broom, Houston, Taylor, Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2015 155 Cullowhee, NC 28723 Hooper Bowles, Jim & Maggie 431 Moss Cove Road Cullowhee, NC 28723 ncjbowles@gmail.com Burns, Martha 3515 Cornith Road Gaffney, SC 29340 Gunter, Green, Jones Christenson, Debra 4330 S. Braun Court Morison, CO 80465 ncjc49@msn.com Adams, Middleton Conner, Mrs. Scott 143 Stonecrest Drive Asheville, NC 28803 connersharon@bellsouth.net Branton, Conner, McCracken, Turner Cooper, Bernie 23813 E. Sisemore Broken Arrow, OK 74014 bcooper@valornet.com Bryson, Ensley, Parris, Conley, Sherrill, Cunningham Craig, Janie Moody 1898 Fairlawn Court Rock Hill, SC 29730 Moss, Moody Dalton, Richard Delano 114 Childers Court Elizabethtown, KY 42701 tradeered1@hotmail.com Frizzell, Pressley, Tilley, Dalton Fariello, Anna P.O. Box 2212 Cullowhee, NC 28723 Fariello@wcu.edu Frady, Sally 234 John Deitz Road Sylva, NC 28779 Frady, Parris, Green Freeman, Villa H. 2105 Sugarloaf Mtn. Road Hendersonville, NC 28792 Villa645@bellsouth.net Holland, Crawford, Nicholson, Parker, etal Hall, Guy Edward 548 Leatherwood Road Sylva, NC 28779 papawguy01@yahoo.com Hall, Leatherwood, Buchanan Hall, Harold Theodore 2261 Old Balsam Road Waynesville, NC 28786 saunnokeharold@gmail.com Hall, Dills Helms, Barbara W. 4842 Huddersfield Drive Harrisburg, NC 28215 Sutton, Wray Jones, Marion & Wanda P.O. Box 951 Dillsboro, NC 28705 Leopard, John & Freda P.O. Box 26 Tuckasegee, NC 28783 History of old families in Glenville/Shook Cove/Tuckasegee areas Manring, Arthur James 735 Red Bank Road Waynesville, NC 28786 jimmanring@gmailcom Manring Marchbanks, Charlene Parris 197 Saluda Circle Central, SC 29630 Maurice, Betty Thomas 2310 Crestview Road West Kelouna, BC – Canada V12121 bjmaur@telus.net Thomas, Reece, Henson, Pressley, Mann McCabe, Kay Franklin 716 Whipperwill Drive Hoover, AL 35244 Kayfmccabe@gmail.com Franklin, Ashe, Carden, Gibson Messer, Dewey 1024 Cedar Creek Farm Road Tuckasegee, NC 28783 Messer, O’Dear, Barker Mills, Rhonda Mae 5646 Big Level Road Mill Spring, NC 28956 rmmcrp@yahoo.com Mills, Dyer Mitchel, Jeanie 114 Catnip Road Cullowhee, NC 28723 johnmitchell08@aol.com Monteith, Delos 134 Razorback Trail Sylva, NC 28779 monteith45@yahoo.com Monteith, Gribble Parris, Theodore Calvin 2002 Tablerock Road Pickens, SC 29671 Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2015 156 Parris, William Terrell 1996 Tablerock Road Pickens, SC 29671 Queen, Joe Sam 209 Hillview Circle Waynesville, NC 28786 Rodgers, Lucy 5410 Tillman Territory Road Ninety-Six, SC 29666 Shuler, Charles 145 Mayberry Drive Cullowhee, NC 28723 Shuler, Caney Fork families Smith, Marie & Peggy Wike 155 Fred Smith Road Tuckasegee, NC 28783 pswike@frontier.com Solesbee, Henry 2517 Long Branch Nantahala, NC 28781 solesbee51@hotmail.com Stewart, Marcia 665 Briggs Cove Road Robbinsville, NC 28771 lilbear2006@yahoo.com Boone, Hopson, Cheny, Gabel Stucky, Janet G. 181 Appletree Lane Columbia, SC 29170 JGStucky@sc.rr.com Crawford, Hoyle Terry, Lee & Tracy 117 West Forest Drive Spartanburg, SC 29301 tracyingtrees@gmail.com Terry, Brooks, Cope, Hensley, Raines, Mingus, Jenkins, Sutton, Howards, Pope, Ammons, Riley, Tucker, Clark, Ward, Ballen Wood, Annette 1232 Lolly Lane, Apt. C Greensboro, NC 27405 annettewood1954@gmail.com Ward, Bishop Worley, Donna Matthews 306 School Road Marshall, NC 28753 Zuponcic, Cindy 1087 Spencer Drive Downingtown, PA 19335 czuponcic@comcast.com Moore, Lewis, Chambers, Wilson, Greene, Lemmons Black, Mildred 34 Tall Timber Drive Sylva, NC 28779 ncmildred@frontier.com Bryson, Nell E. 378 Ferguson Road Sylva, NC 18779 Farmer, Aquilla Henry 17 Burning Ridge Drive Sylva, NC 28779 Henry, Carver, Passmore Floyd, Rufus Gordon P.O. Box 21 Kingsland, TX 78639 Green, Cozette 3705 Artic Blvd. PMB 2300 Anchorage, AK 99503 McGinnis, James 13205 Ladybank Lane Herndon, LA 20171 Phillips, Sam B., Jr. 227 Hunter Road Simpsonville, SC 29681 Ryan, James C., Jr. P.O. Box 2044 Cashiers, NC 28717 Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2015 157 “And the Winners Are” The 2015 Mountain Heritage Day Individual Award was given to one of our own this year. Receiving this award for his many years of participation in the annual Mountain Heritage Day, was R. O. Wilson. He has been a tireless worker, keeping the heritage of our area alive with many presentations, stories, and demonstrations. Congratulations to R.O. for a job well done. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2015 158 Jackson County Historical Association President, (and one of our own), Joe Rhinehart, presents to William “Bill” Crawford, the NC Folklore Society’s 2015 Brown- Hudson Award. It is given to individuals who contribute to the study or continuation of folk traditions of North Carolina. Bill is well known as a genealogist with knowledge of many of the families in Jackson County. He has presented, with others, a program on old working tools for the Society. He was a big part of the cemetery books of not just Jackson County, but other counties as well. He is a modest man, but, we can honestly say that this is a well deserved award for him. Congratulations. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2015 159 Descendants of John Thomas Tatham ED: This family record was submitted by JCGS member, Mary Buchanan Smith. It will continue in following issues. 50. Callie Tatham She was born 1 Apr 1879 in Jackson Co., NC and died 1969 in Jackson Co., NC. She is buried in New Savannah Baptist Church Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. She married (1) Benjamin H. Hughes 4 Mar 1900. He was born 16 Oct1873 and died 29 Aug 1902 in Jackson Co., NC. He is buried in Wesleyana Methodist Church Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. She married (2) William A. Buchanan. He was the son of Robert (Bob) Granderson Buchanan and Martha Jane Talitha Deitz. He was born 29 Feb 1884 in Savannah community, Jackson Co., NC and died 1963 in Savannah community, Jackson Co., NC. He is buried in New Savannah Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. Callie Tatham and Benjamin H. Hughes had the following child: i. Earl George Hughes He was born 18 May 1901 in Jackson Co., NC and died Jun 1982 in Jackson Co., NC. Notes for Earl George Hughes: Never married, lived with his aunt Jennie Isabella (Belle) Tatham, in Savannah Community across from the Wesleyanna Methodist Church. Notes for William A. Buchanan: 1910 Census Tatham’s Creek Rd. Savannah, Jackson Co., NC William Buchanan 26 md. 5 yrs. Wood hauler – drives team Callie 31 3 children – 1 living Gudger 3 Martha 1 1920 Census, Savannah, Jackson Co., NC 1930 Census, Savannah, Jackson Co., NC William A. Buchanan 35 William A. Buchanan 46 house carpenter Callie 40 Callie 50 James G. 12 Gudger 22 truck driver Robert P. 8 Perry 18 Samuel F. 6 Ferry 16 David 4 yrs 11 mons David 14 Margie 2 yrs 7 mons Victoria 13 1940 Census, Jackson Co., NC William Buchanan 56 Carpenter Callie 60 Ferry 26 Victoria 22 Seamstress, Sewing room Callie Tatham and William A. Buchanan had the following children: 127. i. James Gudger Buchanan He was born 2 Apr 1907 in Jackson Co., NC and died 6 Feb 1963 in Jackson Co., NC. He is buried in Greens Creek Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. ii. Etala Buchanan She was born 1909 in Savannah community, Jackson Co., NC and died 1910 in Savannah community, Jackson Co., NC. She is buried in New Savannah Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC iii. Martha Buchanan She was born 1909 128. iv. Robert Perry Buchanan He was born 22 Apr 1911 in Jackson Co., NC and died 10 Feb 1976 in Jackson Co., NC. He is buried New Savannah Cemetery, Savannah , Jackson Co., NC. v. Samuel Ferry Buchanan He was born 1913 in Jackson Co., NC and died 17 Mar 1964 in Franklin, Macon Co., NC. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2015 160 vi. David John Buchanan He was born 29 Jan 1915 in Jackson Co., NC and died 27 Jan 1985 in Jackson Co., NC. He is buried in New Savannah Baptist Church Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. vii. Margie Buchanan She was born 1917. viii. Victoria Buchanan She was born 27 May 1917 in Savannah, Jackson Co., NC and died 18 Mar 2010 in Decatur, Morgan Co., Alabama. Notes for Victoria Buchanan: Lived in Knoxville, Tennessee 51. Amanda Jane Tatham She was born 14 May 1880 in Jackson Co., NC and died 13 Dec 1964 in Jackson Co., NC. She is buried in Wesleynna Methodist Church Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. She married Napoleon Higdon. He was the son of Americus V. Higdon and Ida Roxanna Ashe. He was born 23 Dec 1881 in Jackson Co., NC and died 17 M 1947 in Jackson Co., NC. He is buried in Wesleyanna Methodist Church Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. Notes for Napoleon Higdon: 1910 Census, Savannah, Jackson Co., NC 1920 Census, Savannah, Jackson Co., NC Napoleon Higdon 38 1930 Census, Savannah, Jackson Co., NC Amanda 38 Napoleon Higdon 49 farmer Carl 14 Amanda 49 Birdie 12 Bertie 22 Amanda Jane Tatham and Napoleon Higdon had the following children: i. Elaine Higdon 129. ii. Carl Higdon He was born 25 Apr 1905 in Jackson Co., NC. He married Dianne Lannings in 1924. 130. iii. Birdie Higdon She was born 1907. She married Harley Lyle Buchanan 16 Jun 1940. 52. Emlis David Tatham He was born 10 Jul 1882 in Jackson Co., NC and died 4 FEB 1965 IN Burke Co., NC. He is buried Lovedale Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. He married Elsie Mae Higdon 4 Jan 1905 in Jackson Co., NC. She was the daughter of Columbus C. Higdon and Violet Jane Wilson. She was born 16 Oct 1883 in Jackson Co., NC and died 17 Feb 1965 in Haywood Co., NC. She is buried in Lovedale Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. Notes for Emlis David Tatham: 1910 Census, Savannah, Jackson Co., NC 1920 Census, Savannah, Jackson Co., NC Emlis Tatham 27 Emlis Tatham 37 Elsie 26 3 children, 2 living Elscie M. 36 Vanarah 3 Varanah 13 Annie V. 1 2/12 Anna 10 Columbus C. 5 WWI Draft Card – Blue Eyes, Light Hair Emlis David Tatham and Elsie Mae Higdon had the following children: i. Violet R. Tatham She was born on 6 Oct 1905 in Jackson Co., NC and died 12 Jan 1908 in Jackson Co., NC. She is buried in Wesleyanna Methodist Church Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. 131. ii. Rillie Vanarah Tatham She was born 7 Dec 1908 in Jackson Co., NC. She married Roy Glenn Buchanan 11 Jan 1925. 132. iii. Anna Velva Tatham She was born 15 Jan 1909 in Jackson Co., NC and died Oct 1976 in Jackson Co., NC. She is buried in Fairview Memorial Gardens, Jackson Co., NC. iv. Christopher Columbus Tatham He was born 2 Sep 1914 in Jackson Co., NC. v. Vertie Mae Tatham She was born 12 Aug 1918 in Jackson Co., NC and died 3 Oct 1918 in Jackson Co., NC. She is buried in Wesleyanna Methodist Church Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2015 161 133. vi. Susie Bell Tatham She was born 17 Mar 1920 in Jackson Co., NC. She married James Leonard Coggins 31 Aug 1946 in Clayton, Rabun Co., GA. Occupation: Teacher, Religion: Baptist. 53. John Thomas Tatham He was born 10 Jan 1866 in Jackson Co., NC and died 7 Sep 1937 in Macon Co., NC. He is buried in Wesleyanna Methodist Church Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. He married Sallie Elizabeth Hedden 12 Feb 1893 in Watagua Church, Macon Co., NC. She was born 23 Oct 1874 in Macon Co., NC and died 24 Oct 1956 in Jackson Co., NC. She was buried in Wesleyanna Methodist Church Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. Notes for John Thomas Tatham: John was also known as Tow-head John. 1900 Census, Savannah, Jackson Co., NC 1910 Census, Savannah, Jackson Co., NC John Tatham 33 b. Jan 1866 John Tatham 44 Sallie E. 25 b. Oct 1874 Sallie 35 Carmia 5 b. Oct 1874 Carmie 15 Fannie B. 3 mo. b. Feb 1900 Fannie 10 Mary C. 40 b. May 1860 boarder Henry 9 Lemon 4 2/12 1920 Census Savannah, Jackson Co., NC Rillie 1 7/12 John T. Tatham 56 Sallie 45 1930 Census, Jackson Co., NC Henry T. 16 John Tatham 63 farmer Leman 14 Sallie 55 Rillie M. 11 Leoman 24 Julia E. 9 Julia 19 Lenna M. 6 Lena 17 James 4 5 mon James 14 John Thomas Tatham and Sallie Elizabeth Hedden had the following people: i. Roscoe Ardell Tatham He was brn 20 Jan 1894 in Jackson Co., NC and died 5 Apr 1894 in Jackson Co., NC He is buried in Wesleyanna Methodist Church Cemetery Jackson Co., NC. 134. ii. Carma Elsie Tatham She was born 11 Mar 1895 in Jackson Co., NC and died 12 Jan 1987 in Jackson Co., NC. She is buried in Old Savannah Baptist Church Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. She married Thaddeus Garland Reed 18 Mar 1918 in the home of Nelson Deitz, East Fork, Savannah, Jackson Co., NC. iii. Radford Harvey Tatham He was born 18 Nov 1898 in Jackson Co., NC and died 31 Dec 1898 in Savannah, Jackson Co., NC. He is buried in Wesleyanna Methodist Church Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. 135. iv. Fannie Isabella Tatham She was born 13 Feb 1900 in Savannah, Jackson Co., NC. v. Ella Mae Tatham She was born 3 Mar 1902 in Jackson Co., NC and died 18 Aug 1902 in Jackson Co., NC. 136. vi. Henry Thomas Tatham He was born 26 Sep 1903 in Jackson Co., NC He married Annie Victoria Nations 14 Mar 1925 in Beta, Jackson Co., NC. 137. vii. Leamon Johnson Tatham He was born 27 Oct 1906 and died 24 Jul 1972 in Jackson Co., NC. He married Tula Cogburn in 1928. 138. viii. Rillie Margie Tatham She was born 17 Aug 1908 in Savannah, Jackson Co., NC. She married Loftis Huffman 20 Sep 1929. 139. ix. Julia Emma Tatham She was born 9 Dec 1910 in Jackson Co., NC. She married Burley Ballard 23 Jul 1934 Clayton, Rabun Co., GA. 140. x. Lenna Marie Tatham She was born 3 Jan 1913 in Jackson Co., NC. She married Charles Roberson 20 Jan 1934 in Greenville, SC. 141. xi. James Virgie Tatham He was born 16 Jul 1915 Savannah, Jackson Co., NC and died 27 Nov 1969 in Buncombe Co., NC. He married Gracie Marie McMahan 24 May 1945. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2015 162 54. George R. Tatham He was born 22 Mar 1871 in Jackson Co., NC and died 1937 in Darrington, Snohomish Co., WA. He is buried in Darrington Cemetery, Snohomish Co., WA. He married Omie Collins 24 Dec 1890 in Graham Co., NC. She was born Jun 1872 in Jackson Co., NC and died 3 Jan 1903. Notes for George R. Tatham: 1900 Census, Savannah Township, Jackson Co., NC 1910 Census, Savannah, Jackson Co., NC Thomas Tatham 73 1920 Census, Savannah, Jackson Co., NC Belle 24 daughter Belle Tatham 34 George 38 widower, son George R. 48 brother Willie 17 grandson William 27 nephew Hettie 10 granddaughter George E. Hughes 18 nephew Earl Hughes 9 grandson George R. Tatham and Omie Collins had the following children: i. William Tatham He was born 8 Feb 1892 in Jackson Co. NC and died 1 Apr 1960 Darrington, Snohomish Co., WA. He is buried in Darrington Cemetery, Snohomish Co., WA. ii. Gertrude Tatham She was born on 9 Jun 1894 and died Apr 1973 142. iii. Bertha Catherine Tatham She was born 1 Apr 1897 in Jackson Co., NC and died 17 May 1977 in Jackson Co., NC. She is buried in Fairview Memorial Gardens, Jackson Co., NC. iv. Hettie Tatham She was born 12 Jul 1900. 55. Marcus Ervin Tatham He was born 3 Dec 1873 in Jackson Co., NC and died 4 Nov 1963 in Skagit Co., WA. He is buried in Sedro Wooley, Skagit Co., WA. He married Lena Cannon 27 Jan 1896 in Jackson Co., NC. She was born 27 Jan 1877 in Jackson Co., NC and died 19 Feb 1970 in Skagit Co., WA. She is buried in Sedro Wooley, Skagit Co., WA. Notes for Marcus Ervin Tatham: 1900 Census, Webster, Jackson Co., NC 1910 Census, South Burlington Pre. Skagit Co., WA Irvin Tatham b. Nov 1873 Erwin Tatham 31 L. b. Jul 1877 Lena 32 Ralph b. Jul 1899 Ralph 11 Ethel 8 1920 Census Mansford, Skagit Co., WA Maggie 6 Ervin Tatham 46 NC Harry 2 b. WA P. Lena 42 NC J. Harry 12 WA 1940 Census, West Hamilton, Skagit Co., WA Katherine 8 WA Lena P. Tatham 62 Irene 1 5/12 WA Harry James 32 Bookkeeper for logging co Louis Ervin 18 New worker Marcus Ervin Tatham and Lena Cannon had the following children: 143. i. Ralph Tatham He was born 11 Jul 1898 in Jackson Co., NC and died 20 Feb 1940 in Jackson Co., NC. He is buried in Parris Cemetery, Jackson Co., NC. 144. ii. Ethel Tatham She was born 16 May 1900 in Jackson Co., NC. 145 iii. Louis Ervin Tatham He was born 5 Feb 1902. 146. iv. Margaret Tatham She was born 12 Nov 1903 and died 2 Jun 1953. 147. v. Harry James Tatham He was born 17 Aug 1907 and died 6 Jun 1965 in Skagit Co., WA. vi. Hal Tatham He was born 18 Apr 1909 and died 29 Apr 1909. vii. Katherine Tatham She was born 11 Aug 1911 and died 6 Feb 1921 in Skagit Co., WA She is buried in Sedro Wooley, Skagit Co., WA. viii. Irene Tatham she was born 21 May 1918 ad died 3 Nov 2005 in Sterling, WA. Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2015 163 1880 Jackson County Census Records ED: We continue in this issue the Scotts Creek Township. Abstracted in 2015 by Sanji Talley Watson. The enumerator had trouble keeping the numbers of the households and families in order, they are abstracted as written. 16-16 Hall, Tabitha A. 61 W – House keeping NC NC NC 17-17 Gunter, Mary J. 60 W – House keeping NC NC NC Margret 27 W – Daughter – At home “ “ “ Mary A. 26 W – Daughter – At home “ “ “ John A. 9/12 W – Grandson “ “ “ 18-18 Gunter, Samuel 30 W – Farming GA NC NC Dorcus M. 22 W – Wife – House keeping NC NC NC William A. 4 W – Son TN GA NC Andrew 2 W – Son NC GA NC Noah 1/12 W – Son “ “ “ 19-19 Heren, William T. 29 W – Farming NC NC NC Mary E. 25 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Laurena 6 W – Daughter “ “ “ Thomas S. 5 W – Son “ “ “ Queen, Manda C. 14 W – Servant “ “ “ 20-20 Bryson, Coleman 32 W – Farming NC NC NC Olif J. 26 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Martha M. 7 W – Daughter “ “ “ Mary J. 6 W – Daughter “ “ “ Emaline 4 W – Daughter “ “ “ Fanny M. 1 W – Daughter “ “ “ Crawford, Pinkney 33 B – Servant “ “ “ 21-21 Bryson, Francis M. 34 W – Farming NC NC NC Fanny C. 33 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Thomas C. 14 W – Son – At home “ “ “ John B. 13 W – Son – At home “ “ “ Robert L. 10 W – Son – At home “ “ “ Ensley, Juda E. 83 W – Mother-in-law “ “ “ 22-22 Mckay, Jesse R. 36 W – Farming SC SC SC Harriet E. 29 W – Wife – House keeping NC NC NC Robert H. 9 W – Son NC SC NC William A. 7 W –Son “ “ “ Marj J. 5 W – Daughter “ “ “ Samuel L. 2 W – Son “ “ “ Harriet L. 9/12 W – Daughter “ “ “ 23-23 Conner, Marcus L. 36 W – Farming NC NC NC Mary L. 38 W – Wife – House keeping IL MO SC Silvester L. 15 W – Son – At home NC NC IL Thadeus M. 6 W – Son “ “ “ 24-24 Jones, Zachariah ? 66 W – Farming NC NC NC Sarah 66 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ 25-25 Ensley, Rufus W. 17 W – Farming NC NC NC Mary E. 16 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ 26-26 Conner, Zachariah 27 W – Farming NC NC NC Elizabeth J. 27 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ William A. 10 W – Son – At home “ “ “ Henry L. 8 W – Son “ “ “ John L. H. 6 W – Son “ “ “ Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2015 164 David A. 4 W – Son “ “ “ Lily M. 1 W – Daughter “ “ “ Conner, Sims W. 20 W – Brother – Works on farm “ “ “ 27-27 Snider, William S. 32 W – Farming NC NC NC Margret J. 27 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ George H. 11 W – Son – At home “ “ “ Robert L. 8 W – Son “ “ “ William L. 5 W – Son “ “ “ Odius K. 2 W -- Son “ “ “ Millinder, Mary T. 11 W – Servant “ “ “ 28-28 Queen, Lawson P. 19 W – Orphans – Farming NC TN SC Arty 21 W – Sister – House keeping “ “ “ Laura 12 W – Sister – At home “ “ “ Doctor S. 10 W – Brother – At home “ “ “ Sarah J. 8 W – Sister “ “ “ 29-29 Jones, Samuel 25 W – Farming NC NC NC Manerva E. 18 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Elmira E. 2 W – Daughter “ “ “ 30-30 Queen, Thomas H. 25 W – Farming NC NC NC Elizabeth J. 22 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Lawson H. 1 W – Son “ “ “ 31-31 Conner, David 63 W – Farming NC NC NC Nicy 62 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Mary A. 27 W – daughter – At home “ “ “ Anna D. 10/12 W – Granddaughter “ “ “ 32-32 Shanly, Mary 32 W – House keeping TN TN NC Arizona 10 W – Daughter – At home TN SC TN 33-33 Smathers, Alford 59 W – Farming NC NC NC Hannah 66 W – Wife – Hosue keeping “ “ “ Marthe L. A. 23 W – Daughter – At home “ “ “ Sarah 13 W – Granddaughter – At home “ “ “ Mary 9 W – Granddaughter “ “ “ 34 Smathers, Marcus 27 W – Farming NC NC NC Elen L. 19 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Alva E. 11/12 W – Daughter “ “ “ 34-35 Smathers, Scott 30 W – Farming NC NC NC Sarah 30 W – Wife – Hose keeping “ “ “ Emor 10 W – Daughter – At home “ “ “ Mary 6 W – Daughter “ “ “ William 4 W – Son “ “ “ George 1 W – Son “ “ “ 36 Waltrip, Matilda 50 W – House keeping NC NC NC Elijah 15 W – Son – Works on farm “ “ “ 35-37 Hoyles, John 32 W – Framing NC NC NC Margret 24 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Mary 11 W – Daughter – At home “ “ “ Margaret 9 W – Daughter “ “ “ Julius 6 W – Son “ “ “ 36-38 Snider, James L. 31 W – Farming NC NC NC Harriet O. 21 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ 37-39 Queen, John M. 31 W – Farming NC NC NC Margart M. 28 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ James A. 7 W – Son “ “ “ Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2015 165 Nancy E. 4 W – Daughter “ “ “ Harriet H. 1 W – Daughter “ “ “ 38-40 Brooks, Loucinda 54 W – House keeping NC NC NC John R. 21 W – Son – Works on farm “ “ “ Margart 18 W – Daughter – At home “ “ “ Mary M. 16 W – Daughter – At home “ “ “ William T. 13 W – Son – At home “ “ “ 39-41 Norman, David S. 36 W – Farming NC NC NC Elizabeth 33 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Jula 3 W – Daughter “ “ “ Thomas G. 1 W -- Son “ “ “ Gunter, William T. 22 W – Servant “ “ “ 40-42 Ensley, Robert J. 20 W – Farming NC TN NC Matha H. 16 W – Wife – House keeping NC NC NC James H. 1 W – Son “ “ “ 41-42 Henson, Franklin T. 49 W – Farming NC NC NC Mary L. 47 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Mary M. 21 W – Daughter – At home “ “ “ Smathers, Daniel 66 W – Uncle “ “ “ 42-44 Love, William R. 50 W – Framing NC TN NC Mary J. 46 W – Wife – House keeping TN TN TN James 12 W – Son – At school NC NC TN Sarah 5 W – Daughter “ “ “ Mary W. 1 W – Daughter “ “ “ 43-45 Henson, Thomas M. 53 W – Farming NC NC NC Elizabeth A. 45 W – Wife – house keeping “ “ “ Burton R. 10 W – Son – At home “ “ “ Laura T. 7 W – Daughter “ “ “ Blanton, Catherine 35 W – Servant “ “ “ White, David 17 W – Servant “ “ “ 44-46 Crawford, Olif V. 63 W – House keeping NC NC NC Welch, Henry D. 26 W – Son-in-law – Farming “ “ “ Varina C. 18 W – Daughter – At home “ “ “ Noara 7/12 W – Granddaughter “ “ “ Woodruff, Sarah 59 W – Servant “ “ “ 45-47 Henson, Andrew R. 19 W – Farming NC NC NC Mary A. 17 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Joseph E. 1/12 W – Son “ “ “ 46-48 Bryson, Thadeus G. 30 W – Farming NC NC NC Hannah 27 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ William E. 11 W – Son – At home “ “ “ Nelson 9 W -- Son “ “ “ Laura C. 7 W – Daughter “ “ “ Goalman 5 W – Son “ “ “ Zebulon V. 4 W – Son “ “ “ Jula T. 2 W – Daughter “ “ “ 47-49 Carson, Charlotte 57 W – House keeping NC NC NC Julius T. 22 W – Son – Farming “ “ “ 48-50 Queen, Joseph 27 W – Farming NC NC NC Lida J. 24 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Mary C. 6 W – Daughter “ “ “ Leander 4 W – Son “ “ “ William 1 W -- Son “ “ “ Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2015 166 49-51 Dean, Roger 20 W – Farming SC SC SC Haseltine 19 W – Wife – House keeping NC NC NC James T. 8/12 W – Son NC SC NC 50-52 Stiles, Elijah 27 W – Farming NC NC NC Martha F. 29 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ John A. 4 W – Son “ “ “ Mary T. 2 W – Daughter “ “ “ Thebe L. 6/12 W – Daughter “ “ “ 51-53 Carson, William T. 25 W – Farming NC NC NC Harriet E. 26 W – Wife – House keeping NC SC SC John L. 5 W – Son NC NC NC Mary M. 4 W – Daughter “ “ “ Julius H. 2 W – Son “ “ “ Martha C. 1/12 W – Daughter “ “ “ 52-54 Bryson, Samuel H. 36 W – Farming NC NC NC Jule A. 35 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ William R. 15 W – Son – At home “ “ “ Martin A. 12 W – Son – At home “ “ “ Aaron C. 10 W – Son – At home “ “ “ Avery A. 7 W – Son “ “ “ Martha G. 3 W – Daughter “ “ “ 53-55 Arington, Thomas F. 63 W – Farming TN NC NC Mary 47 W – Wife – house keeping NC NC NC Nancy C. 20 W – Daughter – At home NC TN NC Sina 8 W – Daughter “ “ “ Alice 6 W – Daughter “ “ “ Monteeth Nanne 82 W – Mother-in-law NC ng ng 54-56 Lindsey, David 27 W – Farming NC NC NC Talitha L. 27 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Lily E. 5 W – Daughter “ “ “ Nana E. 10/12 W – Daughter “ “ “ Duncan, Levada 15 W – Servant GA TN NC 55-57 Duncan, Moses D. 46 W – Farming TN KY NC Nancy 43 W – Wife – House keeping NC NC NC Elvira 20 W – Daughter – At home NC NC NC Jesse E. 17 W –Son – At home NC TN NC Duncan, Henry 18 W – Nephew – At home GA GA TN 56-58 Duncan, Pinkney 21 W – Farming NC NC NC Martha A. 20 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ 57-59 Bryson, Robert 67 W – Farming NC NC NC Juda E. 39 W – Wife – House keeping “ “ “ Plott, Robert H. 13 W – Step-son – At home “ “ “ Amos B. 9 W – Son “ “ “ Hebern L. 7 W -- Son “ “ “ Theodore D. 4 W – Son “ “ “ Fanny 1 W – Daughter “ “ “ 58-60 Extine, Andrew 51 W – Working on farm TN TN TN Sarah 43 W – Wife – house keeping SC SC NC Louis 13 W – Son -- At home SC TN SC William 10 W – Son – At home NC TN SC James H. 8 W – Son “ “ “ George W. 2 W – Son “ “ “ Martha E. 1 W – Daughter “ “ “ Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2015 167 Descendants of Archer Blanton ED: Jim McGinnis a JCGS member, graciously submitted this article and accompanying pictures the Society for use in JTJ. It will continue in further issues. William Jackson Blanton and Denica Whitaker had the following children: i. Priscilla Blanton was born 6 Jul 1840 in Rutherford Co., NC and died in 1899. She married Drury Dobbins Green on 24 Nov 1864. ii. Spencer Blanton was born 1843 in Rutherford Co., NC iii. David Blanton was born 1845 in Rutherford Co., NC iv. Melvin Blanton was born 11 Nov 1845 in Rutherford Co., NC and died 2 Jun 1893. Notes for Melvin Blanton: Resident of Rutherford Co., NC; enlisted 12 Jan 1864; mustered into Co. I, 56th NC Inf.; POW 1 Apr 1965, Five Forks VA; confined to Point Lookout, MD, 6 Apr 1965; Oath of Allegiance, 23 Jun 1965, Point Lookout, MD. v. Sarah Louisa Blanton was born on 15 Oct 1847 in Rutherford Co., NC and died 28 Apr 1900. vi. Alford Blanton was born in 1848 in Rutherford Co., NC vii. Asa Burton Blanton was born 8 Oct 1849 in Rutherford Co., NC and died 15 Jun 1917. viii. Manerva Blanton was born in 1852. 17. Stephen Fletcher Blanton was born 12 Aug 1820 in Rutherford Co., NC and died 13 Nov 1900 in Whitewright, TX. He married Sarah McDaniel, daughter of John McDaniel, Jr and Mary Sperling on 28 Jan 1845 in Rutherford Co., NC. She was born 27 Oct 1823 in Rutherford Co., NC and died 25 Jan 1889 in Whitewright, TX. Notes for Stephen Fletcher Blanton: Stephen F. Blanton was born 12 Aug 1820 in Rutherford Co., NC, the seventh child of Jeremiah Blanton and Sarah Womack. Proof of this is fro the Blanton Family Bible now located in the Oak Grove Methodist Church at Ellenboro, NC. The Bible previously belonged to Mrs. C. A. Kennedy of Ellenboro, a descendant of Temperance Blanton, sister of Stephen. 1850Census, Sandy Run District, Rutherford Co., NC, family 151 Stephen 30 born NC Sarah 23 born NC Julia 3 born NC daughter Cyntha Phillips 45 born NC (Brother Elijah’s sister in law) In 1851, Stephen and Sarah deed land to Lydia McDaniel, Quit Claim Deed, Bk 45 pg 861. In 1852, Stephen sold land to Martin Bean. The deed was signed by Stephen and his father, Jeremiah also signed as a witness. A copy was sent to wrm by Jim Burns of Tulsa, a descendant of Jeremiah thru son Ransom. 1860 Census, Broad River District, Rutherford Co., NC, family #1153 Stephen 40 born NC Sarah 37 Julia 13 Mary Ann 10 Samuel 6 Elijah 4 Sarah 2 Cinthia Phillips 60 Stephen was a veteran of the Civil War. He enlisted 19 Oct 1863, serving as a private in Co. B, 34th NC Inf., Captain McRae’s Calvary. He was wounded 30 Sep 1864 and sent to Richmond, VA hospital. He was released 24 Oct 1864. He was captured at Sutherland Station on 2 Apr 1865 and sent to Hart’s “Devil’s” Island in the Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2015 168 New York Harbor. On 18 Jun 1865 after the war was over, he signed an Oath of Allegiance to the USA and was released. He stated in the Oath that his home was Rutherfordton, Rutherford Co., NC. He was shown to be light complected, had light hair, blue eyes and was 5 feet 10 ½ inches high. Family lore is that it took Stephen 6 months to return home. In 1869, Stephen and Sarah sold land to Elijah M. Sweezy, Bk 49 pg 346. Elijah must have been a close friend, since Stephen named one of his sons, Elijah Sweezy Blanton, born 1856 They were probably getting ready to move to Texas. 1870 Census, Hickory Grove Post Office Rutherford Co., NC, pg 291, family #40 Stephen 49 Sarah 47 Samuel 16 Elijah 14 Sarah 12 Lydia 10 He and his family moved to Fannin Co., TX, taking 11 weeks and arriving in January 1871. They settled a few miles east of Whitewright, TX. 1880 Census, Fannin Co., TX, Pct 3 pg 382B, family 115 Stephen Sarah Elijah 24 George W. 28 (Probably son of Stephen’s brother Elijah) In 1886, land in NC was sold b Stephen and Sarah to N.B. McBrayer, Bk 60 pg 171. This was probably conducted by mail, since there is no family lore about them traveling back to North Carolina. Sarah died in 1889 and was buried on their property, since a blizzard had hit and it was too cold and bad to take her to Whitwright. Land was set aside for a cemetery and she was reburied there. It later became the Blanton Cemetery. Stephen died in 1900 and was buried next to Sarah. Later, son Elijah and his wife, Maggie were buried next to Stephen and Sarah. The cemtery was named E. S. Blanton cemetery in the 1980’s. Sources of Information: 1. Edna Blanton Marshall Bible in possession of Mary Marshall Morrow, 2501 Morrow Road, Tisomingo. 2. 1860 Census, Rutherford Co., NC call 355, family 1153. 3. Marriage license of S. F. Blanton and Sarah McDaniel from NC State Archives, record 088 01 023 4. Rutherford Co., NC marriages #086 01 023 5. Fannin Co., TX marriages 6. Confederate War Records, Washington, DC Archives 7. Tombstone inscriptions, E. S. Blanton Cemetery near Whitewright, TX. 8. 1870 Census, Rutherford Co., NC Hickory Grove pg 291, family #40 9. S. F. Blanton affadavit on Josiah Blanton’s pension #3344 Indian Wars. 10. Photo of Stephen Blanton courtesy of Jane Brown 1989. Notes for Sarah McDaniel: 9 Jun 2010 – Mary Morrow’s test results from 23andMe showed <1% Asian, which means she carries Native American blood. We strongly suspect Sarh was part Native American, based upon Mary Morrow’s test Sarah apparently was less than ¼ blood. Source of Information: www.23andme.com/user/claim: 37AC-MFHE-HK$F Journeys Through Jackson Fall 2015 169 Stephen Fletcher Blanton and Sarah McDaniel had the following children: i. Julia Ann Blanton was born 4 Aug 1847 in Rutherford Co., NC and died 20 Feb 1947 in Whitwright, Grayson Co., TX. She married Benjamin Franklin Blanton, son of Benjamin Edward Blanton and Margaret Feagins 12 Oct 1865 in Rutherford Co., NC. He was born 11 Nov 1843 in Rutherford Co., NC and died 2 Mar 1935 in Whitewright, Grayson Co., TX. Notes for Julia Ann Blanton: Article from unknown newspaper transcribed by Ruth Hasten Walsh; copy for transcription provided by Dorothy Latimer, Trenton, TX. Blanks indicate torn places in the newspaper clipping from which the story was transcribed. MRS. JULIA BLANTON RECALLS FOUR WARS ON 98TH BIRTHDAY Mrs. Julia Blanton of Whitewright, mother of Mrs. Walter Badgett, 1317 South Mirick, quietly celebrated her ninety-eight birthday Aug 4 and recalled four wars in her experiences of almost a century, three quarters of which have been spent in Grayson and Fannin counties. Beginning with the War between the states, her experiences extend through the Spanish-American War and World War I to the present conflict in which she has grandsons, great-grandsons and great