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Attributional and consequential environmental assessment of using waste cooking oil- and poultry fat-based biodiesel blends in urban buses: a real-world operation condition study
Mohammad Rajaeifar;Meisam Tabatabaei;Reza Abdi;Ali Mohammad Latifi;Fatemeh ...
Academic Journal Academic Journal | Biofuel Research Journal, Vol 4, Iss 3, Pp 638-653 (2017) Please log in to see more details
Urban public transportation sector in general is heavily dependent on fossil-oriented ... more
Attributional and consequential environmental assessment of using waste cooking oil- and poultry fat-based biodiesel blends in urban buses: a real-world operation condition study
Biofuel Research Journal, Vol 4, Iss 3, Pp 638-653 (2017)
Urban public transportation sector in general is heavily dependent on fossil-oriented fuels, e.g., diesel. Given the fact that a major proportion of urban pollution and the consequent threats towards public health are attributed to this sector, serious efforts at both technical and political levels have been being made to introduce less-polluting fueling regimes, e.g., partial replacement of diesel with biodiesel. In line with that, the present study was aimed at evaluating the emissions attributed to 5% blends of waste cooking oil (WCO) and poultry fat (PF) biodiesel fuels (i.e., B5-WCO and B5-PF fuel blends) when used in urban buses during idle operation mode. Moreover, the attributional and consequential environmental impacts of using these fuel blends were also investigated through a well to wheel life cycle assessment (LCA) by considering the real-world condition combustion data using ten urban buses. The findings of the ALCA revealed that the application of 1 L B5-WCO fuel blend could potentially reduce the environmental burdens in human health, ecosystem quality, and resources damage categories compared with using the B5-PF fuel blend. The situation was opposite for climate change damage category in which using 1 L B5-PF fuel blend had a lower impact on the environment. Overall, the environmental hotspots in the B5-WCO and B5-PF life cycles were identified as the combustion stage as well as the diesel production and transportation. From the consequential perspective, using 1 L B5-WCO fuel blend could potentially decrease the environmental burdens in human health, ecosystem quality, and resources damage categories. While, the situation was different for climate change damage category where using 1 L B5-PF fuel blend could have a lower impact on the environment. In conclusion, using B5-WCO fuel blend as an alternative for diesel could be an environmentally-friendly decision for the Iranian urban transportation sector at the policy level as long as the marginal suppliers of oil would be the same as the countries considered herein, i.e., Malaysia and Argentina.

Subject terms:

Urban public transportation sector - Bus - Idle operation - Biodiesel - Attributional LCA - Consequential LCA - Fuel - TP315-360 - Energy industries. Energy policy. Fuel trade - HD9502-9502.5

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Experimental investigation of a novel PVt/heat pump system for energy-efficient poultry houses.
Gurler, Tugba;Elmer, Theo;Cui, Yuanlong;Omer, Siddig;Riffat, Saffa
Academic Journal Academic Journal | International Journal of Low Carbon Technologies. Dec2018, Vol. 13 Issue 4, p404-413. 10p. 1 Color Photograph, 5 Diagrams, 7 Charts, 5 Graphs. Please log in to see more details
Despite the promise of abundant renewable energy resources in the world, the poultry s... more
Experimental investigation of a novel PVt/heat pump system for energy-efficient poultry houses.
International Journal of Low Carbon Technologies. Dec2018, Vol. 13 Issue 4, p404-413. 10p. 1 Color Photograph, 5 Diagrams, 7 Charts, 5 Graphs.
Despite the promise of abundant renewable energy resources in the world, the poultry sector is still dominated by traditional energy sources. In this study, results of a field trial of an innovative and cost-effective HVAC system design applied to a poultry house have been presented. This system comprises of two integrated novel components; a polyethylene heat exchanger (PHE) based a photovoltaic thermal (PVt) array and an efficient and innovative ground pipe array coupled to a heat pump driven HVAC system. The analysis included the daily PV electrical output and heat pump performance. The results of the experimental study reveal that 3733 kWh and 2432 kWh heat energy have been supplied in the 7-week growth cycle of chickens condition, respectively. The COP of the HP has been calculated for the winter period and observed between 2.3 and 2.43. The PV system was able to generate 1876 kWh electrical energy with potential to meet HP's energy needs in the most energy needing period. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Subject terms:

Polyethylene - Heat pumps - Poultry housing - Heat exchangers - Cost effectiveness

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Development of an RT-qPCR assay for the specific detection of a distinct genetic lineage of the infectious bursal disease virus.
Tomás, Gonzalo;Hernández, Martín;Marandino, Ana;Techera, Claudia;Grecco, So...
Academic Journal Academic Journal | Avian Pathology; Apr2017, Vol. 46 Issue 2, p150-156, 7p Please log in to see more details
The infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is a major health threat to the world’s pou... more
Development of an RT-qPCR assay for the specific detection of a distinct genetic lineage of the infectious bursal disease virus.
Avian Pathology; Apr2017, Vol. 46 Issue 2, p150-156, 7p
The infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is a major health threat to the world’s poultry industry despite intensive controls including proper biosafety practices and vaccination. IBDV (Avibirnavirus, Birnaviridae) is a non-enveloped virus with a bisegmented double-stranded RNA genome. The virus is traditionally classified into classic, variant and very virulent strains, each with different epidemiological relevance and clinical implications. Recently, a novel worldwide spread genetic lineage was described and denoted as distinct (d) IBDV. Here, we report the development and validation of a reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assay for the specific detection of dIBDVs in the global poultry industry. The assay employs a TaqMan-MGB probe that hybridizes with a unique molecular signature of dIBDV. The assay successfully detected all the assessed strains belonging to the dIBDV genetic lineage, showing high specificity and absence of cross-reactivity with non-dIBDVs, IBDV-negative samples and other common avian viruses. Using serial dilutions ofin vitro-transcribed RNA we obtained acceptable PCR efficiencies and determination coefficients, and relatively small intra- and inter-assay variability. The assay demonstrated a wide dynamic range between 103and 108RNA copies/reaction. This rapid, specific and quantitative assay is expected to improve IBDV surveillance and control worldwide and to increase our understanding of the molecular epidemiology of this economically detrimental poultry pathogen. [ABSTRACT FROM PUBLISHER]

Subject terms:

INFECTIOUS bursal disease virus - BIRNAVIRIDAE - BIOSAFETY - QUANTITATIVE research - POULTRY viruses

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Modeling as a research tool in poultry science.
Gous, R. M.
Academic Journal Academic Journal | Poultry Science; Jan2014, Vol. 93 Issue 1, p1-7, 7p Please log in to see more details
The World's Poultry Science Association (WPSA) is a long-established and unique organi... more
Modeling as a research tool in poultry science.
Poultry Science; Jan2014, Vol. 93 Issue 1, p1-7, 7p
The World's Poultry Science Association (WPSA) is a long-established and unique organization that strives to advance knowledge and understanding of all aspects of poultry science and the poultry industry. Its 3 main aims are education, organization, and research. The WPSA Keynote Lecture, titled “Modeling as a research tool in poultry science,” addresses 2 of these aims, namely, the value of modeling in research and education. The role of scientists is to put forward and then to test theories. These theories, or models, may be simple or highly complex, but they are aimed at improving our understanding of a system or the interaction between systems. In developing a model, the scientist must take into account existing knowledge, and in this process gaps in our knowledge of a system are identified. Useful ideas for research are generated in this way, and experiments may be designed specifically to address these issues. The resultant models become more accurate and more useful, and can be used in education and extension as a means of explaining many of the complex issues that arise in poultry science. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Subject terms:

POULTRY -- Societies, etc. - POULTRY industry - POULTRY research - SIMULATION methods & models - ORGANIZATIONAL aims & objectives - KNOWLEDGE gap theory

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Studies Concerning the Dynamics of Productive Indicators on Gray Guinea Fowl (Numida Meleagris).
ROŞCA, Dan Claudiu;USTUROI, Marius Giorgi
Academic Journal Academic Journal | Bulletin of the University of Agricultural Sciences 2018, Vol. 75 Issue 1, p1-4, 4p Please log in to see more details
Growing guinea-fowls is an area of less research activity, although meat and eggs from... more
Studies Concerning the Dynamics of Productive Indicators on Gray Guinea Fowl (Numida Meleagris).
Bulletin of the University of Agricultural Sciences 2018, Vol. 75 Issue 1, p1-4, 4p
Growing guinea-fowls is an area of less research activity, although meat and eggs from this species are increasingly sought by consumers around the world. In addition, there is a number of very valuable biological features that makes this sector such attractive. This paper deals with a study on the productive performance of the gray guinea fowl under controlled ambient conditions. The biological material consisted of 50 specimens of guinea-fowls, purchased from a producer in our country. Those guinea fowls were grown according to the species-specific technology, from one day to 77 days. The target indicators were body weight, weight gain, feed consumption and stockholding proportion, determined in accordance with the poultry research methodology. The data were statistically processed using the Anova (Analysis of variance) program. For the gray guinea fowl, the growing period has been divided into three stages of age, differentiated by the protein level of the feed. At the time of population, the body weight of birds was 28.09 ± 0.35 g, and on the day of slaughter (77th day), 1923.76 ± 18.29 g. This weight was achieved with a feed conversion index of 1: 3.64. The gray guinea fowl exhibits good organic resistance and ensures satisfactory meat production under conditions of optimal nutrient feeding. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Subject terms:

GUINEAFOWL - POULTRY reproduction - POULTRY farming

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Can micro health insurance reduce poverty? Evidence from Bangladesh.
Hamid, Syed Abdul;Roberts, Jennifer;Mosley, Paul
Periodical Periodical | Journal of Risk and Insurance. 2011, Vol. 78, Issue 1, pages. 26 Please log in to see more details

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The long view: 40 years of avian leukosis research.
Payne LN;Nair V
Academic Journal Academic Journal | Publisher: Informa Healthcare Country of Publication: England NLM ID: 8210638 Publication Model: Print Cited Medium: Internet ISSN: 1465-3338 (Electronic) Linking ISSN: 03079457 NLM ISO Abbreviation: Avian Pathol. Subsets: MEDLINE Please log in to see more details
The present review is aimed at the non-specialist reader and is one of a number being ... more
The long view: 40 years of avian leukosis research.
Publisher: Informa Healthcare Country of Publication: England NLM ID: 8210638 Publication Model: Print Cited Medium: Internet ISSN: 1465-3338 (Electronic) Linking ISSN: 03079457 NLM ISO Abbreviation: Avian Pathol. Subsets: MEDLINE
The present review is aimed at the non-specialist reader and is one of a number being written on important diseases of poultry to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the birth of Avian Pathology, the journal of the World Veterinary Poultry Association. The diseases of the avian leukosis complex have a number of features of distinction. They were the first neoplastic diseases in any species to be shown, 100 years ago, to be transmissible and caused by viruses, and have consequently been studied extensively by biomedical scientists as models for the role of viruses in cancer. They also became, from around the 1920s, the major cause of mortality and economic loss to the developed poultry industry, and were studied by agricultural scientists searching to understand and control them. The remit of the review is to cover research carried out over the 40 years since 1971, when the journal was founded. In this review on avian leukosis, an introductory summary is given of knowledge acquired over the preceding 60 years. Subsequently a selection is provided of discoveries, both fundamental and more applied, that seem to us to be of particular importance and interest. Much of the work was carried out by biomedical scientists interested in cancer. Probably the most significant was the discovery in the avian retroviruses of oncogenes that cause leukosis and other tumours and of their origin from proto-oncogenes in normal cells. These oncogenes are involved in cancer in many species, including chickens and humans. Other work was performed by agricultural scientists interested in poultry disease. Interests of the two groups have overlapped, particularly as a result of a shift of emphasis to molecular biology research.

Subject terms:

Animals - Avian Leukosis Virus metabolism - History, 20th Century - History, 21st Century - Poultry - Avian Leukosis pathology - Avian Leukosis virology - Avian Leukosis Virus genetics - Research history - Retroviridae Proteins genetics

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Obituaries.
Academic Journal Academic Journal | World's Poultry Science Journal; Dec2018, Vol. 74 Issue 4, p749-753, 5p Please log in to see more details
Paul Hocking 1948 - 2018 Paul Hocking was born in 1948 and grew up on a mixed farm nea... more
Obituaries.
World's Poultry Science Journal; Dec2018, Vol. 74 Issue 4, p749-753, 5p
Paul Hocking 1948 - 2018 Paul Hocking was born in 1948 and grew up on a mixed farm near Exeter in Devon. He read agriculture at Reading University and obtained a postgraduate Diploma in Genetics at Edinburgh University in 1970. From 1970 to 1977 he worked for a secretariat providing services to cattle breeding societies. His work on a selection programme for dairy shorthorn cattle formed the basis for his PhD awarded in 1978 by Reading University. After 3 years lecturing at Reading he spent the next two years as a research fellow at the Animal Research Centre in Ottawa. It was there that he started to transfer his genetic interests from cattle to poultry. In 1983 he joined the Nutrition Department at the Poultry Research Centre in Edinburgh with the remit to study the topic of feed restriction in breeding birds. He remained there for the rest of his career seeing many changes, with the centre by the time of his retirement having been absorbed into the Roslin Institute and subsequently the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Science in the University of Edinburgh. Paul quickly made a name in what became known as the 'broiler breeder paradox'. The large body of work that defined the reproductive biology of broiler breeders and its control by feed restriction made him the go-to person for broiler and turkey breeder reproductive and welfare research. All Paul's work was characterised by well-designed experiments and careful conclusions that led to sound understanding. This standing was recognised by the European Food Standard agency, with him serving on their Panels on Animal Health and Welfare of broilers and broiler breeders and in judicial reviews in the UK on breeder welfare. Paul embraced the genomic revolution and was in the forefront of setting up the populations needed to identify genes for Mendelian and quantitative traits in poultry. He found new applications for his talents in understanding eye defects and disease susceptibility. His review, published in the WPSJ in 2008, on foot pad lesion scoring remains high in the cited papers list. Paul was diligent in carrying a piece of work through to its completion and was author or co-author of over 200 papers. He was a sought-after speaker and had travelled around the world on his reputation - travelling was something he much enjoyed. His work was recognised by the award of the Gordon Memorial Medal in 2013 giving his widely acclaimed lecture on the subject of 'The unexpected consequences of genetic selection in broilers and turkeys: problems and solutions' Paul made a huge contribution to the committees and societies in our science community. He was a prominent figure in the UK branch of the World Poultry Science Association (WPSA). He served as its President and played an important role in several of the Poultry Science Symposia organised by the Branch. Paul also made a major contribution to the European Federation of WPSA. He was Vice President from 2006 to 2010 and the UK representative on Working Group 3 (Genetics). He organised the 7th Symposium of the Group in Scotland. He was a Council Member of British Poultry Science and in 2010 became its Joint Editor. Paul was popular with his colleagues and with his thoughtful, friendly demeanour was a welcome collaborator on many projects. His unique style of after-dinner jokes has been imitated but not matched. His service to the science and community that underpins such a major industry has left a lasting legacy. All these things, except the jokes, were recognised when Paul was elected to the International Poultry Hall of Fame at the World Poultry Congress in Beijing in 2016. He was a great scientist, contributing hugely to poultry research, as well as a friend and mentor to many. Paul had latterly decreased his work load to part time, preparatory to moving back to his roots in Devon. He had started his new life there, much preferring the milder climate to that of Edinburgh. It is a great pity that the rapid onset of a cancer deprived him of more years of retirement. He leaves a wife, Denise, son Chris and daughters Michelle and Jenny. He will be much missed by them and his many friends and colleagues around the world. Dr Ian Dunn and Professor Colin Whitehead Donald McQueen Shaver 12 August 1920 – 28 July 2018 One of the first Canadians inducted into the International Poultry Hall of Fame, Donald Shaver, founder of Shaver Poultry Breeding Farms Ltd., has died, a few days short of his 98th birthday. Donald Shaver was born and grew up in Galt, now part of Cambridge, Ontario. As a teenager he kept chickens in the backyard of his urban home, and in a vacant lot next door. He joined the Canadian army in the second World War, achieved the rank of Lieutenant Colonel, and was part of the force that liberated The Netherlands in 1945. After the war, he extended his interest in poultry breeding and established a hatchery and feed mill in Galt. He assembled a large collection of White Leghorn lines purchased from other breeders and began crossbreeding experiments that led to the development of the Shaver Starcross 288. The outstanding performance of this hybrid encouraged Shaver to expand his operations and begin selling parent stock to franchise hatcheries in Canada and the United States. He built a larger hatchery and established a breeding farm adjacent to his home on the outskirts of Galt. By the mid 1960's new farms were added, and a much larger hatchery, as the business expanded around the world. At its height, Shaver Poultry Breeding Farms Ltd. was selling breeding stock in more than 90 countries. Subsidiary companies were established in the US, Great Britain, France, and Germany. There were joint ventures in Pakistan, New Zealand, India and Barbados. The company expanded into brown egg layers and meat chickens, which were sold alongside the highly successful white egg Starcross 288. By the mid 1970's there were four breeding farms in Cambridge, and two hatcheries. Breeding development work took place in France and Great Britain as well as in Canada. Donald Shaver was himself responsible for a large part of the Company's success and expansion. He travelled extensively, probably spending between one third and one half of his time overseas. While at home he worked 16 hours, seven days a week, and expected similar commitment from his staff. Initially, most of the genetics input came from consultants, of which Dr R.K. Cole of Cornell University was the most active. In-house geneticists were hired beginning in the 1960's and two were employed at the time of Donald Shaver's retirement in 1985. Early on, during a period of rapid expansion, Cargill Inc. of Minneapolis became part owners of Shaver Poultry Breeding Farms. When Donald Shaver retired in 1985, they became sole owners and soon sold the Company to ISA in France, and they in turn were taken over by what has now become Hendrix Genetics. This Company still maintains two of the breeding farms and a busy hatchery in Cambridge. Shaver also established a beef breeding business and it became quite successful, selling frozen semen and embryos internationally. However, when one case of mad-cow disease occurred in Alberta in 1995, the international market shut down and the beef business closed. After retirement, Donald Shaver maintained his lifelong advocacy for sustainable agriculture. He made his final presentation on this topic in 2016. He was involved as a Director in energy, insurance, communication and manufacturing. He was Chairman of Canada Development Investment Corporation until 2008. Among many awards, Donald Shaver received honorary doctorates from the Universities of McGill, Guelph and Alberta, and was an Officer of the Order of Canada. He is survived by two sons and two daughters, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. John Brake 1952 – 2018 NC State University's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences lost a world-renowned poultry science expert and award-winning teacher, mentor and leader on July 31, when the William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor, John Brake passed away. Brake, aged 66, had a long history with NC State and its Prestage Department of Poultry Science – first as an undergraduate studying poultry and animal science and then as a Ph.D. student in physiology in the 1970s. He joined the faculty at Auburn University in 1978, then returned to NC State as an assistant poultry science professor in 1981. Brake's research assistant Rasha Qudsieh noted that he was best known for his expertise in feed milling, enzymes, induced moulting of commercial layers, management and nutrition of broiler breeders and their progeny, processing and hatchery management. "He also developed and managed a truly singular vertically integrated broiler breeder-broiler research programme based at NC State for over 30 years," she said. Brake wrote hundreds of scientific and popular articles that have been translated into over 10 languages, and he has consulted and presented in more than 40 countries. He held several leadership roles in his department and for professional societies, and served as poultry science's research coordinator for eight years and director of graduate programmes for 15 years. He won many other research, teaching and international service awards, including the university's Global Engagement Award in 2016, its Outstanding Young Alumnus Award in 1986 and CALS' graduate instructor award in 2003. He has received two of the highest honours bestowed by the Poultry Science Association: He won the Merck Award for Achievement in 1995 and was named a fellow in 2006. Pat Curtis, head of the Prestage Department of Poultry Science, said that Brake was "a friend, colleague, mentor and scholar (who) will be greatly missed by the department and the poultry industry." John Brake was a long-time and very active WPSA member. He attended and actively participated in WPSA meetings/seminars around the globe and provided consulting service to many in the poultry industry in all parts of the world. He was a regular fixture at poultry meetings, and well known and respected by his fellow poultry scientists. Dr Peter E. Lake OBE, FRSE 23 September 1928 – 14 June 2018 Dr Peter Edmund Lake passed away suddenly but peacefully on 13th June 2018 aged 89 years at a care home in Annan, Dumfriesshire, Scotland. His home of 66 years had been Edinburgh where he devoted his entire working life (1951-1988) to avian research, specifically but not exclusively relating to the domestic fowl. He established a world-wide reputation in the field of artificial insemination that had wide ranging benefits for the poultry industry in Britain and around the world. Dr Lake had a degree in Zoology from Birmingham University (1949), a diploma in Agriculture from Christ's College, Cambridge (1950) and a PhD in avian reproductive physiology from Edinburgh University (1955). In 1951 he took a post as a Scientific Officer in the Reproductive Physiology Department at the Poultry Research Centre in Edinburgh, a body of the UK Agricultural and Food Research Council. He was to be based there all his working life ultimately being appointed Acting Head of Station. In the post-War period there was a rapid expansion in the poultry industry as a source of cheaper food and this could not be sustained through traditional farm breeding methods. Peter Lake and colleagues pioneered work on the biochemistry and physiology of the production and function of the spermatozoa of domestic birds (especially chickens and turkeys). He recognised the importance of artificial insemination not only for the exponential growth of the poultry industry but also to enhance the quality and size of the product through selective breeding. This required much experimentation in the collection, storage and transportation of the spermatozoa. In 1952 Dr Lake spent a study year at the National Institute for Medical Research, Mill Hill, London with Professor A.S. Parkes and Dr C. Polge who had discovered the use of glycerol for freezing spermatozoa. In 1960 Dr Lake spent a sabbatical year on a Lalor Foundation Fellowship at the University of California, Davis with Prof. F.W. Lorenz and Dr F.X. Ogasawara. This was a life shaping experience from which many friendships and partnerships developed, underlined in 1989 with his election as a Fellow of the Poultry Science Association of America. Throughout his career Dr Lake wrote or contributed to scores of scientific articles, books and reviews including in1978 (with J.M. Stewart) a key work for the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food entitled 'Artificial Insemination in Poultry'. He travelled widely in support of colleagues around the world and to attend numerous poultry congresses usually as a speaker or lecturer. In 1980 he spent three months in Japan as Visiting Professor in Animal Science at Kyushu University, advising many poultry breeding centres. Upon his retirement as Head of the Reproductive Physiology Department in 1988 Dr Lake was proud to receive the Order of the British Empire from the Queen in recognition of his lifetimes work. Previously he was also honoured with the Fellowship of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1982 and the Fellowship of the Institute of Biology in 1984. Post-retirement in 1989 he took up a Nicholas Memorial Fellowship at Cuddy Farms in Ontario, Canada advising this multi-national turkey breeder and in December 1989 he concluded his career by accepting a United Nations FAO commission to assist the poultry breeding industry in Albania. Dr Lake married Mary Bennett in 1954, who, over 56 years, was an indispensable part of his success and happiness. They had 4 sons, Michael, Martin, Christopher and Kenneth. Peter missed Mary badly after she passed away in 2010 and Michael also pre-deceased him. Peter is survived by three sons and nine grandchildren. Apart from work and family his great passion was rugby which he enjoyed as a player and referee. Péter Földi Péter Földi, 75, has passed away Monday, August 27th, 2018, following a long-term serious illness. He was Consultant and before the General Secretary of the Hungarian Poultry Product Board. After his graduation as an agricultural engineer on the Agricultural University of Gödöllő he was working in various positions on the experimental farm of the University for 10 years. From 1980 to 1995 he worked at the Hungarian Ministry of Agriculture, between 1991-1995 as Head of Department. From 1995 he was the General Secretary of the Hungarian Poultry Product Board and the secretary of the Association of the Hungarian Layer Hybrid Breeders and Egg producers. From 2010 he was consultant for the Hungarian Poultry Product Board. He was member in the Poultry Department of the Hungarian Veterinary Association. He was one of the editors of the Hungarian Poultry magazine as well. He represented Hungary at the International Egg Commission (IEC) for years. This organisation awarded him with a special prize in 2007. He was the Secretary of the Hungarian Branch of the World's Poultry Science Association (WPSA), and he was Treasurer of the EUWEP and EEPTA as well for years. He was given several state, ministerial and sectoral awards such as 'For Hungarian Poultry Sector' award (2016) , 'Újhelyi Imre' (2011), and 'Életfa' award (2013), when he was 70. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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One hundred years of the World's Poultry Science Association.
HUNTON, P.
Academic Journal Academic Journal | World's Poultry Science Journal; Dec2012, Vol. 68 Issue 4, p758-767, 10p Please log in to see more details
The World's Poultry Science Association was originally formed as the International Ass... more
One hundred years of the World's Poultry Science Association.
World's Poultry Science Journal; Dec2012, Vol. 68 Issue 4, p758-767, 10p
The World's Poultry Science Association was originally formed as the International Association of Poultry Instructors and Investigators in 1912. Its objectives were to foster the development of the poultry industry, and the exchange of information related to poultry science and technology. From small beginnings it has evolved into a strong international organisation with 7700 members in more than 80 countries. The association publishes the World's Poultry Science Journal and promotes and oversees World's Poultry Congresses. It is active in all areas of the poultry industry, from family poultry in developing countries to institutions of research and learning, and production and processing in the industrial world. [ABSTRACT FROM PUBLISHER]

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Temperature, Humidity and Energy Consumption Forecasting in the Poultry Hall Using Artificial Neural Networknetwork
N Gholamrezaei;K Qaderi;K Jafari Naeimi
Academic Journal Academic Journal | Journal of Agricultural Machinery, Vol 7, Iss 2, Pp 546-557 (2017) Please log in to see more details
Introduction Energy consumption management is one of the most important issues in po... more
Temperature, Humidity and Energy Consumption Forecasting in the Poultry Hall Using Artificial Neural Networknetwork
Journal of Agricultural Machinery, Vol 7, Iss 2, Pp 546-557 (2017)
Introduction Energy consumption management is one of the most important issues in poultry halls management. Considering the situation of poultry as one of the largest and most developed industries, it is needed to control growing condition based on world standards. The neural networks as one of the intelligent methods are applied in a lot of fields such as classification, pattern recognition, prediction and modeling of processes. To detect and classify several agricultural crops, a research was conducted based on texture and color feature. The highest classification accuracy for vegetables, grains and fruits with using artificial neural network were 80%, 86% and 70%. In this research, the ability to Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) Neural Network in predicting energy consumption, temperature and humidity in different coordinate placement of electronic control unit sensors in the poultry house environment was examined. Materials and Methods The experiments were conducted in a poultry unit (3000 pieces) that is located in Fars province, Marvdasht city, Ramjerd town, with dimensions of 32 meters long, 7 meters wide and 2.2 meters height. To determine the appropriate placement of the sensor, 60 different points in terms of length, width and height in poultry were selected. Initially, the data was divided into two datasets. 80 percent of total data as a training set and 20 percent of total data as a test set. From180 observations, 144 data were used to train network and 36 data were used to test the process. There are several criteria for evaluating predictive models that they are mainly based according to the difference between the predicted outputs and actual outputs. To evaluate the performance of the model, two statistical indexes, mean squared error (MSE) and the coefficient of determination (R²) were used. Results and Discussions In this study, to train artificial neural network for predicting the temperature, humidity and energy consumption, the trainlm algorithm (Levenberg-Marquardt) was used. To simulate temperature, humidity and energy consumption, networks were trained with two and three layers, respectively. Network with two layers with10 neurons in the hidden layer and one neuron in the output layer with (R²) equal to 0.96 and (MSE) equal to 0.00912, was given the best result for predicting temperature. For humidity electronic sensors, results showed that network with three layers with the 10 neurons in the first hidden layer, 20 neurons in the second hidden layer and one neuron in the output layer with (R²) equal to 0.8 and (MSE) equal to 0.00783 was the best for predicting humidity. Finally, network with two layers with 10 neurons in the first hidden layer, 10 neurons in the second hidden layer and one neuron in the output layer was selected as the optimal structure for predicting energy consumption. For this topology, (R²) and MSE were determined to 0.98 and 0.00114, respectively. Linear and multivariate regression for the parameters affecting temperature, humidity and energy consumption of electronic sensors was determined by the STATGR software. Correlation coefficients indicated that parameters such as length, height and width of the electronic control sensors placed in the poultry hall justified 82% of the temperature changes, 61% of the humidity changes and 92% of the energy consumption changes. Therefore, comparing with correlation coefficients obtained from the neural network models, the highest correlation coefficient was related to energy parameter and the lowest correlation was linked to humidity parameter. Conclusions The results of the study indicated the high performance for predicting temperature, humidity and energy consumption. The networks hadthree inputs including length, width and height of electronic sensor positions and an output for temperature, humidity and energy consumption. For training networks the multiple layer perceptron (MLP) with error back propagation learning algorithm (BP) was used. Functions activity for all networks in hidden layers were tangentsigmoid and in the output layer, linear (purelin). Comparing the results of artificial neural network and logistic regression model showed that artificial neural network model with correlation coefficients of 0.98 (energy), 0.96 (temperature) and 0.8 (humidity) provided closer data to the actual data compared with regression models with correlation coefficients of 0.92, 0.82 and 0.61 for the energy, temperature and humidity respectively.

Subject terms:

Artificialneural network - Electronic control - Energy - Modeling - Temperature - Agriculture (General) - S1-972 - Engineering (General). Civil engineering (General) - TA1-2040

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Obituaries.
Academic Journal Academic Journal | World's Poultry Science Journal; Mar2019, Vol. 75 Issue 1, p155-156, 2p Please log in to see more details
Henk Hupkes June 6, 1947 - November 25, 2018 On Sunday November 25, 2018 the Dutch bra... more
Obituaries.
World's Poultry Science Journal; Mar2019, Vol. 75 Issue 1, p155-156, 2p
Henk Hupkes June 6, 1947 - November 25, 2018 On Sunday November 25, 2018 the Dutch branch of the WPSA lost a charismatic member Henk Hupkes. Henk started his poultry career at Meyn Food Processing Technology B.V. in 1982: his graduation in Mechanical Engineering from the Technical University in Delft provided a good basis for his diverse tasks. Henk provided an indispensable bridge between poultry processing equipment manufacturers and the scientific world. In 1982 he became a member of WPSA NL and was a member of the regional Board from 1986 to 1992. He was member of the organising committee of the successful WPC held in 1992 in Amsterdam, after which he became member and secretary of the Board of the Foundation for Promoting Poultry Science until his death in November 2018. From 1982 to 2010 he attended about all WPCs and EPCs, as well as the symposia of Working Group 5 (poultry meat). In all cases his presence was undeniable due to his eagerness to learn, his friendly and optimistic attitude, and his sense of humour. Since 2015 Henk suffered from cancer, a battle he couldn't win. He finally lost the battle at the age of 71. Henk is greatly missed by his loved ones and his many friends inside and outside the WPSA. He is remembered with respect, warmth and gratitude. Jim McNab April 5, 1940 – January 1, 2019 It is with great sadness that I have to announce the death of Dr Jim McNab, who died suddenly on January 1st. He was born in Comrie, Perthshire to Mary and Donald, in April 1940, and was much loved by his parents and his sister Mary. Jim excelled in school, at Morrison's Academy in Crieff. Outside studies he played for the school's 1st rugby team and enjoyed playing the clarinet. He was also an 'extra' in the 1953 film 'Johnny on the Run'. From 1958 to 1965, Jim attended the University of Edinburgh with great enthusiasm and enjoyment. According to his good friend Dennis, academic issues were never a problem. After graduating with an Honours Degree in Chemistry he moved on to do his PhD in 1962, adopting three 'Objectives', the same ones most Graduate students pursued in the 1960s, namely a PhD in three years, a post-doctoral appointment in North America and finding the love of one's life. He achieved the last of these when he met Carol during the first month of his PhD. He duly graduated in 1965 and set out for Boulder, Colorado, returning briefly for his marriage with Carol in October 1966. After a year in Colorado, they returned home and Jim spent a year back at Edinburgh University before he joined the Nutrition Department at the Poultry Research Centre (PRC) in Edinburgh in October 1968. His research covered many aspects of poultry nutrition, including the digestion of carbohydrate and protein and developing methods for feedstuffs evaluation. He studied feed quality enhancement and assessments of non-traditional feeds. In 1993, Jim became the head of the large Department of Nutritional and Environmental Studies at Roslin Institute, the successor to PRC. The work of his department included behaviour, welfare and other environmental topics, as well as nutrition. He gave good leadership to this widely-based department and battled hard at senior staff meetings at the Institute where the essentially applied nature of his department's work was regarded somewhat less favourably than some of the seemingly more exotic sciences carried out in others. Owing to increasing pressure on government research funding, the idea of expanding commercial income from aspects of Jim's research was proposed, including his methods for feedstuff evaluation assays. In 1997, Roslin Nutrition, a spin-out company from Roslin Institute, was born. Jim and Doug Currie were charged with managing the company, which in 2002 became a completely independent research company, which is still thriving today. Jim was a well-known and popular figure in the poultry nutrition world and a regular speaker at industry and scientific conferences. His other activities at work included responsibility for many national and some international projects, supervising numerous PhD students, co-editing British Poultry Science for 10 years and, for a shorter period, editing World's Poultry Science Journal. He was very active in the UK branch, organising symposia and conferences. Jim retired from the Roslin Institute in 2001 and from Roslin Nutrition in 2005. Outside work, Jim enjoyed playing rugby, squash and bridge. He was a keen vegetable gardener and latterly an enthusiastic cook. He was a proud and loving father to his two sons, Donald and Scott and he adored his four grandchildren When his wife Carol was asked for her thoughts she said: Jim is remembered as having a great sense of humour: being reliable, generous, loving; positive, honest and forthright; a good man, a great dad; an intellectual, wise, clever man; a kind patient and a wonderful person. On a personal note, Jim was a mentor during my PhD, training me in various ME measurements and becoming a good friend, as well as being a previous editor of WPSJ. He is survived by his wife Carol and his children and grandchildren. I would like to thank Carol for her great help with preparing his obituary. Our thoughts are with the family at this difficult time. Dr Lucy Waldron [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Understanding policy dilemmas around antibiotic use in food animals & offering potential solutions
Kamini Walia;Monica Sharma;Sonam Vijay;Bibek R Shome
Academic Journal Academic Journal | Indian Journal of Medical Research, Vol 149, Iss 2, Pp 107-118 (2019) Please log in to see more details
The looming concern of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has prompted the government of m... more
Understanding policy dilemmas around antibiotic use in food animals & offering potential solutions
Indian Journal of Medical Research, Vol 149, Iss 2, Pp 107-118 (2019)
The looming concern of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has prompted the government of many countries of the world to act upon and come up with the guidelines, comprehensive recommendations and policies concerning prudent use of antibiotics and containment of AMR. However, such initiatives from countries with high incidence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in food animals are still in infancy. This review highlights the existing global policies on antibiotics use in food animals along with details of the various Indian policies and guidelines. In India, in spite of availability of integrated policies for livestock, poultry and aquaculture sector, uniform regulations with coordinated initiative are needed to formulate strict policies regarding antimicrobial use both in humans and animals. In an attempt to create effective framework to tackle the AMR, the Indian Council of Medical Research initiated a series of dialogues with various stakeholders and suggested various action points for urgent implementation. This review summarizes the recommendations made during the various consultations. The overarching aim of this review is to clearly delineate the action points which need to be carried out urgently to regulate the antibiotic use in animals.

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Antibiotics - antimicrobial resistance - food animals - India - Indian Council of Medical Research - Policy - Medicine

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Campylobacter Contamination in Retail Poultry Meats and By-Products in the World: A Literature Survey
SUZUKI, Hodaka;YAMAMOTO, Shigeki
Academic Journal Academic Journal | Journal of Veterinary Medical Science. 2009, 71(3):255-261 Please log in to see more details

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Bacterial species from retailed poultry eggs in Tshwane, South Africa : implication for consumers
Botha Francien S.;Buys Elna M.;Jambalang Alexander R.
Periodical Periodical | South African Journal of Science, Mar 2017, Vol 113, Issue 11-12, p. 1-7. Please log in to see more details

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Hidden costs of supply management in a small market.(Author abstract)
Carter, Colin A.;Merel, Pierre
Academic Journal Academic Journal | Canadian Journal of Economics. May, 2016, Vol. 49 Issue 2, p. 555, 34 p. Please log in to see more details

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Harmonization of methodologies for the assessment of poultry meat quality features
Petracci, M.;Baeza, E.
Periodical Periodical | World's poultry science journal, 2011 Mar., v. 67, no. 1, p. 137-151. Please log in to see more details
Includes references
Many different methods measuring meat quality traits are avai... more
Harmonization of methodologies for the assessment of poultry meat quality features
World's poultry science journal, 2011 Mar., v. 67, no. 1, p. 137-151.
Includes references
Many different methods measuring meat quality traits are available which are based on different principles, and instruments and/or probes. In view of the complexity of meat processes after slaughter and quality trait determination, it is not surprising that the results obtained in different studies and laboratories are not always in agreement. For comparison of results it is therefore necessary to keep strictly to measurable specifications, which is why standardisation is indispensable. The Working Group 5 Poultry Meat Quality group of the WPSA European Federation has been asked to produce a document which would serve as a common base methodology that would permit comparison between research projects carried out by different groups, based on international research programmes. This paper represents the first step of this work including chemical (moisture, total lipids, proteins, ash, fatty acid composition, cholesterol, susceptibility to oxidation, amino acids, collagen and pigments) and physical traits (pH, R-value, colour, water holding capacity, texture and sarcomere length). For the evaluation of chemical composition, there are standard methods available which are largely adopted in the majority of published papers. However, there is still a need to standardise methods for determining the physical traits to facilitate comparisons between studies and to provide reference values.

Subject terms:

sarcomeres - fatty acid composition - slaughter - water holding capacity - texture - pigments - oxidation - equipment - cholesterol - poultry meat - meat quality - collagen - color - amino acids - research programs - research projects - normal values

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